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metaphor
used in The Poisonwood Bible

2 uses
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Definition
a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."

When Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." he was not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors. But he was pointing to the similarities he wants us to recognize.
  • Or perhaps the meaning is more metaphorical: Did Paul and Silas reconcile the man's doubts?
    Book 3 — Judges (49% in)
  • Nelson paused for a long time to wipe the ash from his face and puzzle over the metaphor of accessories and outfits.
    Book 3 — Judges (60% in)

There are no more uses of "metaphor" in The Poisonwood Bible.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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