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metaphor

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Definition a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."

When Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." he was not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors. But he was pointing to the similarities he wants us to recognize.
  • He was speaking metaphorically when he referred to being mugged by reality.
metaphorically = with a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote
  • Jefferson used a wall as a metaphor to describe the separation of church and state.
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote
  • Each song deals with the darker side of fame from personal experience, expressed through a monster metaphor.
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote
  • It was falling so hard that it looked like white sparks (and this is a simile, too, not a metaphor).
    Mark Haddon  --  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a word is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."
  • Here I was looking for symbolism and metaphors and, um .... sometimes a duck is just a duck!
    R.J. Palacio  --  Wonder
  • metaphors = figures of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted
  • One Sunday night, lost in fruity metaphors and florid diction, Judge Taylor's attention was wrenched from the page by an irritating scratching noise.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • metaphors = figures of speech
  • "It's a metaphor," I explained. "He puts the killing thing in his mouth but doesn't give it the power to kill him."
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphor = symbol (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • I summed my side up with rare serenity in, 'The folly of mistaking a metaphor for a proof, a torrent of verbiage for a spring of capital truths, and oneself as an oracle, is inborn in us, Mr. Valery once said.'
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote

    For example, Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." Shakespeare is not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors, but there are similarities he wants us to recognize.
  • And I don't mean "kill" as in "metaphor."
    Sherman Alexie  --  The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a word is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."
  • The trance happens when you don't focus on anything, and the whole big picture swallows and moves around you. She said it was usually metaphoric, but for people who should never do acid again, it was literal.
    Stephen Chbosky  --  The Perks of Being a Wallflower
  • metaphoric = like a figure of speech in which a word is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."
  • "the bad guy is always a black-hearted villain. ... The tones of black and white have the greatest amount of contrast between them, therefore writers and poets, who have always dealt with extremes in passion and people, use black and white to create those images of contrast. Can you think of any other example where color is used as a metaphor to express an idea?"
    Sharon M. Draper  --  Tears of a Tiger
  • metaphor = a figure of speech in which a word is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."
  • "Such a good metaphor," he mumbled.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphor = symbol (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • I was all awash in the metaphorical resonance of the empty playground in the hospital courtyard.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphorical = symbolic (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • When surprised and excited and innocent Gus emerged from Grand Gesture Metaphorically Inclined Augustus, I literally could not resist.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphorically = symbolically (in a manner where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • "Well, that metaphor is prohibited on today's flight," she said.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphor = symbol (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • He's a bit too enamored with metaphor.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphor = symbolism — where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other
  • Right, but surely you must have thought about what happens to them, I mean as characters, I mean independent of their metaphorical meanings or whatever.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphorical = symbolic (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • I'm a big believer in metaphor, Hazel Grace.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphor = symbolism — where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other
  • You choose your behaviors based on their metaphorical resonances ....
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • metaphorical = symbolic (in a manner where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)
  • It's a metaphor, see: You put the killing thing right between your teeth, but you don't give it the power to do its killing.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
metaphor = symbol (where a similarity between two things is highlighted by using one of them to represent the other)

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