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grave
used in Light in August

34 uses
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1  —4 uses as in:
Her manner was grave.
Definition
serious and/or solemn
The exact meaning of this sense of grave can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "This is a grave problem," or "a situation of the utmost gravity." — important, dangerous, or causing worry
  • "She was in a grave mood upon returning from the funeral." — sad or solemn
  • "She looked me in the eye and gravely promised." — in a sincere and serious manner
  • Then he looked at her, at her grave face which had either nothing in it, or everything, all knowledge.
    Chapter 18 (62% in)
  • Across the desk, seated again, Hightower watches him gravely.
    Chapter 13 (83% in)
  • Beneath them, steady and constant and with a grave purposelessness (and with here and there, standing motionless or talking to one another from the sides of their mouths, some youngish men, townsmen, some of whom Byron knew as clerks and young lawyers and even merchants, who had a generally identical authoritative air, like policemen in disguise and not especially caring if the disguise hid the policeman or not) countrymen in overalls moved, with almost the air of monks in a cloister,...
    Chapter 18 (1% in)
  • They now moved in a grave and slightly aweinspiring reflected light which was almost as palpable as the khaki would have been which Grimm wished them to wear, wished that they wore, as though each time they returned to the orderly room they dressed themselves anew in suave and austerely splendid scraps of his dream.
    Chapter 19 (62% in)

There are no more uses of "grave" flagged with this meaning in Light in August.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —30 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • His face was rocklike, calm, still bright with that expression of fulfillment, of grave and reckless joy.
    Chapter 19 (80% in)
  • Her voice is quite grave now, quite quiet.
    Chapter 1 (54% in)
  • Lena's lowered face is grave, quiet.
    Chapter 1 (68% in)
  • Some of the other workers were family men and some were bachelors and they were of different ages and they led a catholic variety of lives, yet on Monday morning they all came to work with a kind of gravity, almost decorum.
    Chapter 2 (41% in)
  • You ain't him," she says behind her fading smile, with the grave astonishment of a child.
    Chapter 2 (77% in)
  • Her face is still serene, but now is quite grave, her eyes quite grave and quite intent.
    Chapter 2 (93% in)
  • Her face is still serene, but now is quite grave, her eyes quite grave and quite intent.
    Chapter 2 (93% in)
  • He does not look at her, feeling her grave, intent gaze upon his face, his mouth.
    Chapter 2 (96% in)
  • And how the wife was hardly cold in the shameful grave before the whispering began.
    Chapter 3 (72% in)
  • ...puny, unhorsed figure moving with that precarious and meretricious cleverness of animals balanced on their hinder legs; that cleverness of which the man animal is so fatuously proud and which constantly betrays him by means of natural laws like gravity and ice, and by the very extraneous objects which he has himself invented, like motor cars and furniture in the dark, and the very refuse of his own eating left upon floor or pavement; and he thinks quietly how right the ancients were in...
    Chapter 3 (98% in)
  • But Hightower's face is merely grave and interested.
    Chapter 4 (8% in)
  • Opposite him Byron sits without moving, his face lowered and grave.
    Chapter 4 (21% in)
  • Lena ate heartily again, with that grave and hearty decorum, almost going to sleep in her plate before she had finished.
    Chapter 4 (38% in)
  • Because always against her eyelids or upon her retinae was that still, grave, inescapable, parchmentcolored face watching her.
    Chapter 6 (17% in)
  • But she found him without surprise and he heard and turned and saw her without surprise: the two faces, the one no longer smooth pink-and-white, the other grave, sobereyed, perfectly empty of everything except waiting.
    Chapter 6 (19% in)
  • Even while he was still a child she would take him with her when with all the intense and mysterious caution of a playing child she would creep to the attic and add to the hoard meagre and infrequent and terrific nickels and dimes (fruit of what small chicanery and deceptions with none anywhere under the sun to say her nay he did not know), putting into the can beneath his round grave eyes coins whose value he did not even recognise.
    Chapter 7 (97% in)
  • She wore a faded dressing gown and she carried a candle, holding it high, so that its light fell upon her face: a face quiet, grave, utterly unalarmed.
    Chapter 10 (98% in)
  • He had to hide that grave too, because he thought that someone might see it and happen to remember Calvin and grandfather.
    Chapter 11 (78% in)
  • And all the while her calm profile in the peaceful firelight was as grave and tranquil as a portrait in a frame.
    Chapter 12 (43% in)
  • Byron looks down at him, his face quite grave.
    Chapter 16 (4% in)
  • Then his face sobers; it is quite grave.
    Chapter 16 (93% in)
  • His face is grave now.
    Chapter 17 (71% in)
  • She looks at Hightower, her eyes grave, wide.
    Chapter 17 (73% in)
  • His face is very grave; it is almost as though it had grown ten years older while he stood there.
    Chapter 17 (76% in)
  • His face was quite grave, quite alert.
    Chapter 18 (48% in)
  • Yet still she could watch his mind darting and darting as without pity, without anything at all, she watched him with her grave, unwinking, unbearable gaze, watched him fumble and flee and tack until at last all that remained in him of pride, of what sorry pride the desire for justification was, fled from him and left him naked.
    Chapter 18 (53% in)
  • And those who saw him remembered him again on the day of the fight with the exsoldier as, glittering, with his marksman's badge (he was a fine shot) and his bars, grave, erect, he walked among the civilians with about him an air half belligerent and half the selfconscious pride of a boy.
    Chapter 19 (38% in)
  • They now had a profound and bleak gravity as they stood where crowds milled, grave, austere, detached, looking with. blank, bleak eyes at the slow throngs who, feeling, sensing without knowing, drifted before them, slowing, staring, so that they would be ringed with faces rapt and empty and immobile as the faces of cows, approaching and drifting on, to be replaced.
    Chapter 19 (65% in)
  • They now had a profound and bleak gravity as they stood where crowds milled, grave, austere, detached, looking with. blank, bleak eyes at the slow throngs who, feeling, sensing without knowing, drifted before them, slowing, staring, so that they would be ringed with faces rapt and empty and immobile as the faces of cows, approaching and drifting on, to be replaced.
    Chapter 19 (66% in)
  • The train stopped: the slow aisle, still interrupted with, outlooking, then the descent among faces grave, decorous, and judicial: the voices, the murmurs, the broken phrases kindly yet still reserved of judgment, not yet giving and (let us say it) prejudicial.
    Chapter 20 (73% in)

There are no more uses of "grave" in Light in August.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®