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prudent
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

26 uses
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?  —16 uses
exact meaning not specified
Definition
sensible and careful
  • I deem'd thee once the wisest of thy kind, But ill this insult suits a prudent mind.
    Book 17 (24% in)
  • It furnishes art with all her materials, and without it judgment itself can at best but "steal wisely:" for art is only like a prudent steward that lives on managing the riches of nature.
    Preface (1% in)
  • Ulysses, first in public cares, she found, For prudent counsel like the gods renown'd: Oppress'd with generous grief the hero stood, Nor drew his sable vessels to the flood.
    Book 2 (22% in)
  • Then deeply thoughtful, pausing ere he spoke, His silence thus the prudent hero broke: "Unhappy monarch! whom the Grecian race With shame deserting, heap with vile disgrace.
    Book 2 (35% in)
  • Though secret anger swell'd Minerva's breast, The prudent goddess yet her wrath suppress'd; But Juno, impotent of passion, broke Her sullen silence, and with fury spoke: [Illustration: THE COUNCIL OF THE GODS.
    Book 4 (8% in)
  • Our great forefathers held this prudent course, Thus ruled their ardour, thus preserved their force; By laws like these immortal conquests made, And earth's proud tyrants low in ashes laid."
    Book 4 (57% in)
  • (185) When now the rage of hunger was removed, Nestor, in each persuasive art approved, The sage whose counsels long had sway'd the rest, In words like these his prudent thought express'd: "How dear, O kings! this fatal day has cost, What Greeks are perish'd! what a people lost!
    Book 7 (69% in)
  • Though secret anger swell'd Minerva's breast, The prudent goddess yet her wrath repress'd; But Juno, impotent of rage, replies: "What hast thou said, O tyrant of the skies!
    Book 8 (82% in)
  • Kings thou canst blame; a bold but prudent youth: And blame even kings with praise, because with truth.
    Book 9 (12% in)
  • O prudent chief!
    Book 10 (26% in)
  • Then, where the cry directs, his course he bends; Great Ajax, like the god of war, attends, The prudent chief in sore distress they found, With bands of furious Trojans compass'd round.
    Book 11 (62% in)
  • The flower of Athens, Stichius, Phidas, led; Bias and great Menestheus at their head: Meges the strong the Epaean bands controll'd, And Dracius prudent, and Amphion bold: The Phthians, Medon, famed for martial might, And brave Podarces, active in the fight.
    Book 13 (82% in)
  • "Great is the profit (thus the god rejoin'd) When ministers are blest with prudent mind: Warn'd by thy words, to powerful Jove I yield, And quit, though angry, the contended field: Not but his threats with justice I disclaim, The same our honours, and our birth the same.
    Book 15 (27% in)
  • Experienced Nestor gives his son the reins, Directs his judgment, and his heat restrains; Nor idly warns the hoary sire, nor hears The prudent son with unattending ears.
    Book 23 (37% in)
  • The prudent chief with calm attention heard; Then mildly thus: "Excuse, if youth have err'd; Superior as thou art, forgive the offence, Nor I thy equal, or in years, or sense.
    Book 23 (64% in)
  • When Bellerophon is to be employed in a deadly and perilous undertaking, by those who prudently wished to procure his death, he is despatched against the Amazons.
    Footnotes (41% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" flagged with this meaning in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —10 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • What favourite goddess then those cares divides, Which Jove in prudence from his consort hides?
    Book 1 (90% in)
  • But they have, besides, characters of courage; and this quality also takes a different turn in each from the difference of his prudence; for one in the war depends still upon caution, the other upon experience.
    Preface (22% in)
  • As prudence may sometimes sink to suspicion, so may a great judgment decline to coldness; and as magnanimity may run up to profusion or extravagance, so may a great invention to redundancy or wildness.
    Preface (45% in)
  • He said, and sat: when Chalcas thus replied; Chalcas the wise, the Grecian priest and guide, That sacred seer, whose comprehensive view, The past, the present, and the future knew: Uprising slow, the venerable sage Thus spoke the prudence and the fears of age: "Beloved of Jove, Achilles! would'st thou know Why angry Phoebus bends his fatal bow?
    Book 1 (16% in)
  • That day, Atrides! a superior hand Had stretch'd thee breathless on the hostile strand; But all at once, thy fury to compose, The kings of Greece, an awful band, arose; Even he their chief, great Agamemnon, press'd Thy daring hand, and this advice address'd: "Whither, O Menelaus! wouldst thou run, And tempt a fate which prudence bids thee shun?
    Book 7 (26% in)
  • By mutual confidence and mutual aid, Great deeds are done, and great discoveries made; The wise new prudence from the wise acquire, And one brave hero fans another's fire."
    Book 10 (41% in)
  • And now had Troy, by Greece compell'd to yield, Fled to her ramparts, and resign'd the field; Greece, in her native fortitude elate, With Jove averse, had turn'd the scale of fate: But Phoebus urged AEneas to the fight; He seem'd like aged Periphas to sight: (A herald in Anchises' love grown old, Revered for prudence, and with prudence bold.
    Book 17 (45% in)
  • And now had Troy, by Greece compell'd to yield, Fled to her ramparts, and resign'd the field; Greece, in her native fortitude elate, With Jove averse, had turn'd the scale of fate: But Phoebus urged AEneas to the fight; He seem'd like aged Periphas to sight: (A herald in Anchises' love grown old, Revered for prudence, and with prudence bold.
    Book 17 (46% in)
  • Deserted of the god, yet let us try What human strength and prudence can supply; If yet this honour'd corse, in triumph borne, May glad the fleets that hope not our return, Who tremble yet, scarce rescued from their fates, And still hear Hector thundering at their gates.
    Book 17 (84% in)
  • And where the prudence now that awed mankind?
    Book 24 (26% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®