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wanton
used in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers)

3 uses
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Definition
of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity
  • She took her daughter in her arms and stroked her with her hand, and spake and called upon her name: "Who now of the sons of heaven, dear child, hath entreated thee thus wantonly, as though thou wert a wrong-doer in the face of all?"
    Book 5 (46% in)
  • O ye that wantonly carried away my wedded wife and many of my possessions, when ye were entertained by her, now again ye are fain to throw ruinous fire on the seafaring ships, and to slay the Achaian heroes.
    Book 13 (75% in)
  • And now that I have undone the host by my wantonness, I am ashamed before the men of Troy and women of trailing robes, lest at any time some worse man than I shall say: 'Hector by trusting his own might undid the host.'
    Book 22 (21% in)

There are no more uses of "wanton" in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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