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wanton

used in a sentence
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Definition of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity

In classic literature, wanton can also describe people who are playful or plants that are growing profusely.
  • She is known for wanton behavior.
wanton = excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and especially sexual promiscuity
  • The ability to see beauty is the beginning of our moral sensibility. What we believe is beautiful we will not wantonly destroy.
    Reverend Sean Parker Dennison
  • A little wanton money, which burned out the bottom of his purse.
    Sir Thomas More
  • I care not for those ladies that must be wooed and prayed. Give me kind Amaryllis, the wanton country-maid.
    le Gallienne, Richard  --  The Quest of the Golden Girl
  • -all wantonly raiding a great man's flocks, dishonoring his queen, because they thought he'd come no more.
    Homer  --  The Odyssey
  • wantonly = deliberately and in a bad way
  • As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; they kill us for their sport.
    Aldous Huxley  --  Brave New World
  • wanton = of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as cruelty or violence
  • If you find her a wanton killer you must bring in a verdict of first degree murder.
    Zora Neale Hurston  --  Their Eyes Were Watching God
  • wanton = excessively bad (intentional and unprovoked)
  • He had swept it out of existence, as it seemed, without any provocation, as a boy might crush an ant hill, in the mere wantonness of power.
    H.G. Wells  --  The War of the Worlds
  • wantonness = something excessively bad
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • So much misconstrued in his wantonness.
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry IV, Part 1
  • wantonness = recklessness (thoughtless indulgence)
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • They got back into the truck and continued the patrol, past the Hickey house, empty, door open, windows wantonly smashed.
    Pat Frank  --  Alas, Babylon
  • wantonly = in a bad (thoughtlessly violent and wasteful) manner
  • ...elders of the church have whispered wanton words to the young maids of their households;
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  Young Goodman Brown
  • wanton = improper sexually suggestive
  • Henceforth, do what thou wilt; I rather will suspect the sun with cold Than thee with wantonness:
    William Shakespeare  --  The Merry Wives of Windsor
  • wantonness = of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity
    (Editor's note:  The suffix "-ness" converts an adjective to a noun that means the quality of. This is the same pattern you see in words like darkness, kindness, and coolness.)
  • some wanton charm upon this man and maid
    William Shakespeare  --  The Tempest
  • wanton = of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity
  • And wantonly again with him she play'd,
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales
  • wantonly = in an inappropriate sexual manner
  • As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods,— They kill us for their sport.
    William Shakespeare  --  King Lear
  • wanton = considered bad
  • Not to be married,
    Not to knit my soul to an approved wanton.
    William Shakespeare  --  Much Ado About Nothing
  • wanton = sexually promiscuous woman
  • every idle, nice and wanton reason
    William Shakespeare  --  Henry IV, Part 2
  • wanton = of something considered bad
  • The count he woos your daughter
    Lays down his wanton siege before her beauty
    William Shakespeare  --  All's Well That Ends Well
  • wanton = of something considered bad:  excessive, thoughtless indulgence — such as waste, cruelty, violence, and (especially in the past) sexual promiscuity
  • Made prize and purchase of his wanton eye,
    William Shakespeare  --  The Life and Death of King Richard III
  • wanton = sexually promiscuous
  • They that dally nicely with words may quickly make them wanton.
    William Shakespeare  --  Twelfth Night
wanton = something bad

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