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ostentatious
used in The Mill on the Floss

3 uses
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Definition
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
  • She had been crying, but was rocking baby to sleep in her arms now, and made no ostentatious show of sorrow as her brother looked at her, but merely said: "The father's gone to the field, again, if you want him, brother."
    1.8 -- Book 1 Chapter 8 -- Mr. Tulliver Shows His Weaker Side (92% in)
  • Bob obeyed with ostentatious reluctance.
    5.2 -- Book 5 Chapter 2 -- Aunt Glegg Learns the Breadth of Bob's Thumb (79% in)
  • I am afraid there would have been a subtle, stealing gratification in her mind if she had known how entirely this saucy, defiant Stephen was occupied with her; how he was passing rapidly from a determination to treat her with ostentatious indifference to an irritating desire for some sign of inclination from her,—some interchange of subdued word or look with her.
    6.7 -- Book 6 Chapter 7 -- Philip Re-enters (70% in)

There are no more uses of "ostentatious" in The Mill on the Floss.

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