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ostentatious
used in a sentence

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Definition intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
  • Although wealthy, the family is not ostentatious.
ostentatious = showy (trying to attract notice and impress others in a manner seen as in bad taste)
  • She arrived in an ostentatious stretch limo.
  • ostentatious = showy (intended to attract notice and impress others)
  • A great many people were offended by her ostentatious displays of wealth, and by the shameless way she chased the limelight.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into Thin Air
  • ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • It's why you wanted an ostentatious limousine from our embassy.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Ultimatum
  • ostentatious = showy (intended to attract notice and impress others)
  • Her understated dress was in marked contrast to her ostentatious house:
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Maelstrom
  • ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • She thought they were ostentatious and gas-guzzling, so she drove an oh-so- practical Volvo wagon instead.
    Sara Shepard  --  Pretty Little Liars
  • ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • Brett had noticed Holly's ostentatious display of credit cards.
    Stephen King  --  Cujo
  • ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • ...several commanders in different uniforms came in. They ostentatiously took down names. ... The next night there were even fewer boys.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice
  • Those days are gone. Vatican cars were now less ostentatious and almost always unmarked.
    Dan Brown  --  The Da Vinci Code
  • ostentatious = showy
  • Red tie with a gold tiepin and ostentatious cufflinks with the initials NEB.
    Stieg Larsson  --  The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
  • ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • Her husband was lying in a great leather chair in the dining-room, and by his side, holding his hand rather ostentatiously, was Evie.
    E.M. Forster  --  Howards End
  • ostentatiously = intended to attract notice
  • those who spend on ... ostentation of worldly estate and luxury, shall receive the malison [condemnation] that...
    Geoffrey Chaucer  --  The Canterbury Tales
  • ostentation = things intended to attract notice and impress others
  • [The knife which] was about a foot long; and which he wiped, not wholly without ostentation, on the sleeve of his coat.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • ostentation = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • Algernon is an extremely, I may almost say an ostentatiously, eligible young man.
    Oscar Wilde  --  The Importance of Being Earnest
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
  • said Sikes, looking sternly at him, and ostentatiously passing a pistol into a more convenient pocket.
    Charles Dickens  --  Oliver Twist
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
  • ...and though he should never cease to be a faithful mourner, there was no occasion to wear his weeds ostentatiously.
    Louisa May Alcott  --  Little Women
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
  • In the graveyard, polished granite is replacing marble, and verses are becoming scarce: ostentation lies in size and solidity, not in ornamentation.
    Margaret Atwood  --  Alias Grace
  • ostentation = the way they try to impress others
  • the hands of the royal pair were locked together, and the wedding-ring ostentatiously displayed.
    Mark Twain  --  The Prince and The Pauper
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
  • in evening dress cut ostentatiously low for the occasion
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
  • ostentatiously = in a manner intended to attract notice and impress others
  • Women who had ostentatiously crossed the street when they saw Belle coming, wondered if she remembered and trembled for fear she did.
    Margaret Mitchell  --  Gone with the Wind
ostentatiously = in a showy way (in an attempt to attract notice)

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