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bound
used in The Comedy of Errors

24 uses
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1  —1 use as in:
bound together
Definition
held together (connected or united) or wrapped
The exact meaning of this sense of bound is subject to its context. For example:
  • "The pages of the book are bound with glue." — held together physically
  • "The book is bound in leather." — wrapped or covered
  • "The United States and England are bound together by a common language." — connected or united (tied together metaphorically)
  • "She cleaned the wound and bound it with fresh bandages." — wrapped
  • "She is wheelchair-bound." — connected (moves with a wheelchair because she is unable to walk)
  • "The jacket has bound buttonholes." — edges wrapped by fabric or trim rather than stitches
  • "She's the one in the bound-edge hat." — where the edge of the hat is wrapped in a decorative material.
  • Within this hour I was his bondman, sir, But he, I thank him, gnaw'd in two my cords: Now am I Dromio and his man unbound.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (67% in)

There are no more uses of "bound" flagged with this meaning in The Comedy of Errors.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —23 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • O, my old master! who hath bound him here?
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (78% in)
  • — The sailors sought for safety by our boat, And left the ship, then sinking-ripe, to us;: My wife, more careful for the latter-born, Had fast'ned him unto a small spare mast, Such as sea-faring men provide for storms: To him one of the other twins was bound, Whilst I had been like heedful of the other.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A hall in the DUKE'S palace (52% in)
  • Five summers have I spent in furthest Greece, Roaming clean through the bounds of Asia, And, coasting homeward, came to Ephesus; Hopeless to find, yet loath to leave unsought Or that or any place that harbours men.
    1.1 — Act 1 Scene 1 — A hall in the DUKE'S palace (84% in)
  • There's nothing situate under heaven's eye But hath his bound in earth, in sea, in sky; The beasts, the fishes, and the winged fowls, Are their males' subjects, and at their controls: Man, more divine, the masters of all these, Lord of the wide world and wild wat'ry seas, Indued with intellectual sense and souls Of more pre-eminence than fish and fowls, Are masters to their females, and their lords: Then let your will attend on their accords.
    2.1 — Act 2 Scene 1 — A public place (15% in)
  • You know, since Pentecost the sum is due, And since I have not much importun'd you; Nor now I had not, but that I am bound To Persia, and want guilders for my voyage; Therefore make present satisfaction, Or I'll attach you by this officer.
    4.1 — Act 4 Scene 1 — The same (4% in)
  • Saving your merry humour, here's the note, How much your chain weighs to the utmost carat; The fineness of the gold, and chargeful fashion; Which doth amount to three odd ducats more Than I stand debted to this gentleman: I pray you, see him presently discharg'd, For he is bound to sea, and stays but for it.
    4.1 — Act 4 Scene 1 — The same (28% in)
  • Mistress, both man and master is possess'd; I know it by their pale and deadly looks: They must be bound, and laid in some dark room.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (58% in)
  • [PINCH and assistants bind ANTIPHOLUS OF EPHESUS and DROMIO OF EPHESUS.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (65% in)
  • O, bind him, bind him; let him not come near me.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (66% in)
  • O, bind him, bind him; let him not come near me.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (66% in)
  • Go, bind this man, for he is frantic too.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (71% in)
  • Will you be bound for nothing? be mad, good master; cry, the devil.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (79% in)
  • And come with naked swords: let's call more help, To have them bound again.
    4.4 — Act 4 Scene 4 — The same (91% in)
  • Some get within him, take his sword away: Bind Dromio too, and bear them to my house.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (9% in)
  • To fetch my poor distracted husband hence: Let us come in, that we may bind him fast, And bear him home for his recovery.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (11% in)
  • Once did I get him bound and sent him home, Whilst to take order for the wrongs I went, That here and there his fury had committed.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (34% in)
  • Anon, I wot not by what strong escape, He broke from those that had the guard of him; And, with his mad attendant and himself, Each one with ireful passion, with drawn swords, Met us again, and, madly bent on us, Chased us away; till, raising of more aid, We came again to bind them: then they fled Into this abbey, whither we pursued them: And here the abbess shuts the gates on us, And will not suffer us to fetch him out, Nor send him forth that we may bear him hence.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (36% in)
  • My master and his man are both broke loose, Beaten the maids a-row, and bound the doctor; Whose beard they have singed off with brands of fire; And ever as it blazed they threw on him Great pails of puddled mire to quench the hair: My master preaches patience to him, while His man with scissors nicks him like a fool: And, sure, unless you send some present help, Between them they will kill the conjurer.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (39% in)
  • ...wretch; A living dead man; this pernicious slave, Forsooth, took on him as a conjurer; And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse, And with no face, as 'twere, outfacing me, Cries out, I was possess'd: then altogether They fell upon me, bound me, bore me thence; And in a dark and dankish vault at home There left me and my man, both bound together; Till, gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gain'd my freedom, and immediately Ran hither to your grace; whom I beseech To give me...
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (57% in)
  • ...took on him as a conjurer; And gazing in mine eyes, feeling my pulse, And with no face, as 'twere, outfacing me, Cries out, I was possess'd: then altogether They fell upon me, bound me, bore me thence; And in a dark and dankish vault at home There left me and my man, both bound together; Till, gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gain'd my freedom, and immediately Ran hither to your grace; whom I beseech To give me ample satisfaction For these deep shames and great indignities.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (57% in)
  • Ourselves we do remember, sir, by you; For lately we were bound as you are now.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (68% in)
  • Ay, sir, but I am sure I do not; and whatsoever a man denies, you are now bound to believe him.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (71% in)
  • Whoever bound him, I will loose his bonds, And gain a husband by his liberty.
    5.1 — Act 5 Scene 1 — The same (79% in)

There are no more uses of "bound" in The Comedy of Errors.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®