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bound
used in a sentence

8 meanings
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1  —as in:
south-bound lanes
Definition traveling in a particular direction or to a specific location
  • There was an accident in the south-bound lanes.
bound = travelling (in that direction)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The car broke down in an east-bound lane of the highway 10.
  • bound = travelling (in that direction)
  • The bus was bound for Las Vegas when the accident occurred.
  • bound = heading (travelling) to a specific location
  • The meeting is to inform college-bound students about financial aid.
  • bound = headed (going toward that place—in this case, college)
  • The earth-bound asteroid is thought to have a 1 in 300 chance of hitting our planet in the year 2880.
  • bound = travelling to that location (in this case, earth)
  • The movie is called Homeward Bound.
  • bound = travelling to that location (in this case, home)
  • I am bound and determined to get into a good college.
  • bound = headed (going toward that place—in this case, preparing and planning to go to college)
  • Most captives were forced onto ships, bound for Japan and occupied China as prisoners of war (POWs).
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken - adapted for young adults
  • bound = headed for
  • But pretty soon they be bound for overseas.
    Alice Walker  --  The Color Purple
  • bound = traveling toward
  • A rumour is going round that there may be peace, but the other story is more likely—that we are bound for Russia.
    Erich Maria Remarque  --  All Quiet on the Western Front
bound = to travel to a specific location

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
She's bound to succeed.
Definition almost certain to; or determined to
  • She's bound to get into a good college.
bound = almost certain to
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • This joke is bound to make them laugh.
  • bound = almost certain to
  • Her rudeness is bound to get her in trouble.
  • bound = almost certain to
  • Jimmy was bound to get ahead.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
  • bound = almost certain
  • She bound to live her life and be herself no matter what.
    Alice Walker  --  The Color Purple
  • bound = is determined, or is almost certain
  • If he was bound to have it so, I couldn't help it.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • bound = determined
  • Armstrong said: "I thought he was following me.... Of course, he'd be bound to go slower than we did."
    Agatha Christie  --  And Then There Were None
  • bound = almost certain
  • The Death Eaters know Ron's with you now, they're bound to target the family —
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • bound = almost certain to
  • And if this fight is long, he's bound to win.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
  • bound = almost certain to
  • He's bound to come out in the wash.
    Roald Dahl  --  Charlie And The Chocolate Factory
bound = almost certain

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
bound together
Definition held together (connected or united) or wrapped

(see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
  • The pieces of bread are moistened and bound together with eggs and a small amount of flour.
bound = held together
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The glue binds the two layers together.
  • binds = holds together
  • Economic policy is tightly bound to political choices.
  • bound = connected
  • Her hair was bound into tight braids.
  • bound = held together
  • Her hair was bound back in a single knot.
  • bound = wrapped or held together
  • The bail of straw is bound with two wires.
  • bound = held together
  • The wall was built with primitive straw-bound bricks.
  • bound = held together (the straw helps hold the bricks together)
  • The kira is the national dress for women in Bhutan. It is an ankle-length dress consisting of a rectangular piece of fabric wrapped about the body, pinned at the shoulders, and bounded at the waist with a long belt.
  • bounded = wrapped or held together
  • She took a chair by me, washed the blood from my face, and, with a mother's tenderness, bound up my head, covering the wounded eye with a lean piece of fresh beef.
    Frederick Douglass  --  The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  • bound = wrapped
  • The sailors lashed them to it and bound their hands behind them.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken - adapted for young adults
bound = tied

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
4  —as in:
I can't/must. I'm bound by...
Definition tied up, prevented, or required
  • The suspect sat in the cell with her wrists bound by rope.
bound = tied together
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The prisoner was gagged and bound.
  • bound = tied up
  • It is a binding contract.
  • binding = must be obeyed (The people who signed the contract are legally required to do what it says or suffer legal penalties.)
  • A lawyer is bound by fiduciary duty to act in her client's interest.
  • bound = required
  • The new president said she is not bound by her predecessor's policy.
  • bound = obligated (required to do follow)
  • We are bound by treaty to come to their defense if they are invaded.
  • bound = required
  • He is muscle bound.
  • bound = prevented from moving easily (due to having such large, tight muscles)
  • Shipping in that area is ice-bound this time of year.
  • bound = prevented (because there is so much ice)
  • She is duty bound to try to help us.
  • bound = required (by a job or other responsibility)
  • Unlike pledged delegates, bound delegates are legally required to vote for the candidate they were elected to represent.
bound = obligated (required to act in a certain way)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
5  —as in:
the binding is loose
Definition something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
  • The library buys books with a durable binding or rebinds them to make them stronger.
binding = things that hold the pages together (in this case, careful assembly with glue and perhaps strings)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The book's binding is coming loose.
  • binding = the thing that holds the pages of a book together
  • My snowboard bindings came loose.
  • bindings = mechanical devices that hold a snowboard to boots
  • My ski bindings are too tight.
  • bindings = mechanical devices that hold skis to boots
  • She cut the bindings loose and looked at the wound.
  • bindings = bandages (that wrapped the wound)
  • She put a decorative binding around the hat.
  • binding = material that wraps the edge of the hat
  • He guided his arm to the Bible and his rubber-like left hand sought contact with the black binding.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • binding = the part of a book that holds the pages together
  • ...the incredible books that looked so silly and really not worth bothering with, for these were nothing but black type and yellowed paper, and ravelled binding.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • binding = what holds book pages together
  • Scrimgeour now pulled out of the bag a small book that looked as ancient as the copy of Secrets of the Darkest Art upstairs. Its binding was stained and peeling in places.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • binding = the part of a book that holds the pages together
  • "Oh, that's much easier, thanks, Ron," said Luna, and she began hacking at their bindings again.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
6  —as in:
It put me in a bind.
Definition a difficult situation
  • When she started to gossip, it put her friend in a bind.
bind = difficult situation
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • We owe so much money it has put us in a financial bind.
  • bind = difficult situation
  • The Chinese move puts the U.S. administration in a bind.
  • bind = difficult situation
  • It had to be a trick or you couldn't have done it. It's the bind we were in. We had to have a commander with.... But somebody with that much compassion could never be the killer we needed.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Ender's Game
bind = difficult situation

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
7  —as in:
out of bounds; bounded on the east
Definition a boundary or limit
  • The ball went out of bounds.
bounds = the boundaries of an area where a game is played
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She stepped out of bounds, so the other team got the ball.
  • bounds = the boundaries of an area where a game is played
  • Her behavior was out of bounds.
  • bounds = beyond the limits of what is acceptable
  • Our love knows no bounds.
  • bounds = boundaries (saying it is limitless)
  • The ranch is bound to the east by a river.
  • bound = has a boundary
  • The first scholar said it was between 100 and 200 C.E., but the second scholar suggested a lower bound.
  • bound = limit (in this case, a time before 100 A.D.)
  • But Proctor snatches it up, and now a wild terror is rising in him, and a boundless anger.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • boundless = limitless
  • Pray do not take us as exceeding the bounds of business courtesy in pressing you in all ways to use the utmost expedition.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • bounds = limits
  • Filch found them trying to force their way through a door that unluckily turned out to be the entrance to the out-of-bounds corridor on the third floor.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
  • out-of-bounds = beyond the permitted boundary or limit
  • The valley of ashes is bounded on one side by a small foul river, and, when the drawbridge is up to let barges through, the passengers on waiting trains can stare at the dismal scene for as long as half an hour.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  The Great Gatsby
bounded = limited (stops at)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
8  —as in:
The deer bound across the trail.
Definition to leap or jump
  • She's the sort of person who bounds out of bed in the morning and runs five miles before starting her day.
bounds = jumps
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The deer bounded across the trail and into the woods.
  • bounded = leaped (jumped)
  • The dog jumped the fence in a single bound.
  • bound = leap
  • The company is growing by leaps and bounds.
  • bounds = jumps

    (This expression means that the company is growing very rapidly.)
  • When her plane landed, Louie bounded up the steps to embrace her, then squired her home to meet his family.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken - adapted for young adults
  • bounded = leaped
  • I am almost in, there is a rising screech, I bound, I run like a deer...
    Erich Maria Remarque  --  All Quiet on the Western Front
  • bound = leap
  • Suddenly with a single bound he leaped into the room.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • bound = jump (or long, fast step)
  • Then there was a creature bounding along the pig track toward him, with tusks gleaming and an intimidating grunt.
    William Golding  --  Lord of the Flies
  • bounding = running/leaping
  • "Make yerselves at home," said Hagrid, letting go of Fang, who bounded straight at Ron and started licking his ears.
    J.K. Rowling  --  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
  • bounded = jumped or leaped
  • We bounded down the sidewalk on a spree of sheer relief, leaping and howling.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
bounded = jumped or leaped

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
Less commonly:
For more specialized senses of bound and bind, see a comprehensive dictionary. For example, the word can refer to constipation and has specialized meanings in law, chemistry, logic, and linguistics.
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