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incredulous
used in Moby Dick

5 uses
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Definition
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Natural as it is to be somewhat incredulous concerning...
    Chapters 103-105 — Measurement of The Whale's Skeleton; The Fossil Whale; Does the Whale Diminish (92% in)
incredulous = suspicious that what is said is not true
  • Affected by the solemnity of the scene, there was a wondering gaze of incredulous curiosity in his countenance.
    Chapters 7-9 — The Chapel; The Pulpit; The Sermon (7% in)
  • Any time these ten years, they tell me, has that man held up that picture, and exhibited that stump to an incredulous world.
    Chapters 55-57 — Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint.... (79% in)
  • As such a man, however, was not of much practical use in the ship, especially as he refused to work except when he pleased, the incredulous captain would fain have been rid of him; but apprised that that individual's intention was to land him in the first convenient port, the archangel forthwith opened all his seals and vials—devoting the ship and all hands to unconditional perdition, in case this intention was carried out.
    Chapters 70-72 — The Sphynx; The Jeroboam's Story; The Monkey-Rope (36% in)
  • Then standing as if incredulous for a while, he calmly walked towards the astonished steward slowly saying, "Ginger? ginger? and will you have the goodness to tell me, Mr. Dough-Boy, where lies the virtue of ginger?
    Chapters 70-72 — The Sphynx; The Jeroboam's Story; The Monkey-Rope (92% in)

There are no more uses of "incredulous" in Moby Dick.

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