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incredulous
used in a sentence

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Definition unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • I find it incredulous that you believe she is sincere.
incredulous = difficult to believe
  • I was incredulous. I just didn't believe her.
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Mortati stared in incredulous shock as the man walked in.
    Dan Brown  --  Angels & Demons
  • incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Alice stared up at him, eyes wide and incredulous.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Eclipse
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • "And it took you this long to realize it?" asked Max, incredulous.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Second Siege
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Both looked faintly incredulous, as if she were a talking cockroach.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Bones
  • incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • But, however it may be regarded by the incredulous, I know that it is full of living truths.
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • He stares at me, incredulous.
    Sara Gruen  --  Water for Elephants
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • I asked him whether he
    were talking about the singer, Maria Vasak.

    "You know? You have heard, maybe?" he asked incredulously.
    Willa Cather  --  My Antonia
  • incredulously = with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • "When God wants me, he'll take me," he told an incredulous Pete.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Though suspicion was very far from Miss Bennet's general habits, she was absolutely incredulous here.
    Jane Austen  --  Pride and Prejudice
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • Holly was incredulous. 'A casualty of war? How can you say that? A life is a life.'
    Eoin Colfer  --  Artemis Fowl
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • "But I won," I said, incredulous.
    Alice Sebold  --  Lucky
  • incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • asked the incredulous director of Consular Operations.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Identity
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • ...this country displayed to an incredulous world what greatness was possible to man, what happiness was possible on earth.
    Ayn Rand  --  Atlas Shrugged
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • "Will they shoot Fiedler for that?" asked Liz incredulously.
    John Le Carre  --  The Spy Who Came In From The Cold
  • incredulously = with disbelief; or with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • "He was stealing," I say.

    "What? Of course not!" he shouts, incredulous.
    Chang-rae Lee  --  Native Speaker
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • John's incredulous face slowly softened into a face of doubt.
    Charles Dickens  --  Little Dorrit
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • The magistrate appeared at first perfectly incredulous, but as I continued he became more attentive and interested;
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • incredulous = not believing
  • He said he can get us to the top.
    Frank looked incredulous. "I thought the horse couldn't fly!"
    Rick Riordan  --  The Son of Neptune
incredulous = with disbelief; or with difficulty accepting something so unexpected

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