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i.e.
used in Moby Dick

4 uses
  • Long exile from Christendom and civilization inevitably restores a man to that condition in which God placed him, i.e. what is called savagery.
    Chapters 55-57 — Monstrous Pictures of Whales; Less Erroneous Pictures of Whales; Whales in Paint.... (85% in)
  • But the creatures set down above as Duodecimoes are infallibly whales, by the terms of my definition of what a whale is—i.e. a spouting fish, with a horizontal tail.
    Chapters 31-33 — Queen Mab; Cetology; The Specksnyder (74% in)
  • It is not, perhaps, entirely because the whale is so excessively unctuous that landsmen seem to regard the eating of him with abhorrence; that appears to result, in some way, from the consideration before mentioned: i.e. that a man should eat a newly murdered thing of the sea, and eat it too by its own light.
    Chapters 64-66 — Stubb's Supper; The Whale as a Dish; The Shark Massacre (80% in)
  • But even Solomon, he says, "the man that wandereth out of the way of understanding shall remain" (I.E., even while living) "in the congregation of the dead."
    Chapters 94-96 — A Squeeze of the Hand; The Cassock; The Try-Works (97% in)

There are no more uses of "i.e." in Moby Dick.

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