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however
used in Pride and Prejudice

2 meanings, 134 uses
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1  —117 uses as in:
However, complications may...
Definition
though (or another expression that connects contrasting ideas)

(Based on idea 1 we might not expect idea 2, but this is a way of saying that even though idea 1 exists, we still have idea 2.  Synonyms include in spite of that, , nevertheless, nonetheless, on the other hand, in contrastand but.)
  • He bore it, however, with admirable calmness.
    Chapter 60 (86% in)
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Not all that Mrs. Bennet, however, with the assistance of her five daughters, could ask on the subject, was sufficient to draw from her husband any satisfactory description of Mr. Bingley.
    Chapter 3 (0% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in anything ridiculous.
    Chapter 3 (66% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • But, however, he did not admire her at all; indeed, nobody can, you know; and he seemed quite struck with Jane as she was going down the dance.
    Chapter 3 (84% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Well, that is very decided indeed—that does seem as if—but, however, it may all come to nothing, you know.
    Chapter 5 (43% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • On Miss Lucas's persevering, however, she added, "Very well, if it must be so, it must."
    Chapter 6 (56% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • If I wished to think slightingly of anybody's children, it should not be of my own, however.
    Chapter 7 (24% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Till the next morning, however, she was not aware of all the felicity of her contrivance.
    Chapter 7 (54% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She was received, however, very politely by them; and in their brother's manners there was something better than politeness; there was good humour and kindness.
    Chapter 7 (80% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She was not equal, however, to much conversation, and when Miss Bingley left them together, could attempt little besides expressions of gratitude for the extraordinary kindness she was treated with.
    Chapter 7 (88% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • With a renewal of tenderness, however, they returned to her room on leaving the dining-parlour, and sat with her till summoned to coffee.
    Chapter 8 (37% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • They solaced their wretchedness, however, by duets after supper, while he could find no better relief to his feelings than by giving his housekeeper directions that every attention might be paid to the sick lady and her sister.
    Chapter 8 (98% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • In spite of this amendment, however, she requested to have a note sent to Longbourn, desiring her mother to visit Jane, and form her own judgement of her situation.
    Chapter 9 (3% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • At present, however, I consider myself as quite fixed here.
    Chapter 9 (27% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • But, however, he did not.
    Chapter 9 (69% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • However, he wrote some verses on her, and very pretty they were.
    Chapter 9 (69% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Mrs. Bennet and her daughters then departed, and Elizabeth returned instantly to Jane, leaving her own and her relations' behaviour to the remarks of the two ladies and Mr. Darcy; the latter of whom, however, could not be prevailed on to join in their censure of her, in spite of all Miss Bingley's witticisms on fine eyes.
    Chapter 9 (99% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • The loo-table, however, did not appear.
    Chapter 10 (2% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Allowing the case, however, to stand according to your representation, you must remember, Miss Bennet, that the friend who is supposed to desire his return to the house, and the delay of his plan, has merely desired it, asked it without offering one argument in favour of its propriety.
    Chapter 10 (43% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
    Chapter 10 (70% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She could not win him, however, to any conversation; he merely answered her question, and read on.
    Chapter 11 (24% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Miss Bingley, however, was incapable of disappointing Mr. Darcy in anything, and persevered therefore in requiring an explanation of his two motives.
    Chapter 11 (57% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Against staying longer, however, Elizabeth was positively resolved—nor did she much expect it would be asked; and fearful, on the contrary, as being considered as intruding themselves needlessly long, she urged Jane to borrow Mr. Bingley's carriage immediately, and at length it was settled that their original design of leaving Netherfield that morning should be mentioned, and the request made.
    Chapter 12 (19% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for...
    Chapter 13 (34% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • There is some sense in what he says about the girls, however, and if he is disposed to make them any amends, I shall not be the person to discourage him.
    Chapter 13 (56% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • By tea-time, however, the dose had been enough, and Mr. Bennet was glad to take his guest into the drawing-room again, and, when tea was over, glad to invite him to read aloud to the ladies.
    Chapter 14 (71% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • The next morning, however, made an alteration; for in a quarter of an hour's tete-a-tete with Mrs. Bennet before breakfast, a conversation beginning with his parsonage-house, and leading naturally to the avowal of his hopes, that a mistress might be found for it at Longbourn, produced from her, amid very complaisant smiles and general encouragement, a caution against the very Jane he had fixed on.
    Chapter 15 (18% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • She received him with her very best politeness, which he returned with as much more, apologising for his intrusion, without any previous acquaintance with her, which he could not help flattering himself, however, might be justified by his relationship to the young ladies who introduced him to her notice.
    Chapter 15 (78% in)
  • however = though (used to connect contrasting ideas)
  • Mrs. Phillips was quite awed by such an excess of good breeding; but her contemplation of one stranger was soon put to an end by exclamations and inquiries about the other; of whom, however, she could only tell her nieces what they already knew, that Mr. Denny had brought him from London, and that he was to have a lieutenant's commission in the ——shire.
    Chapter 15 (81% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was over at last, however.
    Chapter 16 (10% in)
  • Her curiosity, however, was unexpectedly relieved.
    Chapter 16 (22% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • After a few minutes' reflection, however, she continued, "I do remember his boasting one day, at Netherfield, of the implacability of his resentments, of his having an unforgiving temper.
    Chapter 16 (58% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • There was no help for it, however.
    Chapter 17 (76% in)
  • Elizabeth, however, did not choose to take the hint, being well aware that a serious dispute must be the consequence of any reply.
    Chapter 17 (88% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • The first two dances, however, brought a return of distress; they were dances of mortification.
    Chapter 18 (8% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • When the dancing recommenced, however, and Darcy approached to claim her hand, Charlotte could not help cautioning her in a whisper, not to be a simpleton, and allow her fancy for Wickham to make her appear unpleasant in the eyes of a man ten times his consequence.
    Chapter 18 (11% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Allow me to say, however, that your fair partner does not disgrace you, and that I must hope to have this pleasure often repeated, especially when a certain desirable event, my dear Eliza (glancing at her sister and Bingley) shall take place.
    Chapter 18 (24% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Recovering himself, however, shortly, he turned to his partner, and said, "Sir William's interruption has made me forget what we were talking of."
    Chapter 18 (26% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Let me recommend you, however, as a friend, not to give implicit confidence to all his assertions; for as to Mr. Darcy's using him ill, it is perfectly false; for, on the contrary, he has always been remarkably kind to him, though George Wickham has treated Mr. Darcy in a most infamous manner.
    Chapter 18 (36% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Mr. Collins, however, was not discouraged from speaking again, and Mr. Darcy's contempt seemed abundantly increasing with the length of his second speech, and at the end of it he only made him a slight bow, and moved another way.
    Chapter 18 (61% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Nothing that she could say, however, had any influence.
    Chapter 18 (73% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • At length, however, Mrs. Bennet had no more to say; and Lady Lucas, who had been long yawning at the repetition of delights which she saw no likelihood of sharing, was left to the comforts of cold ham and chicken.
    Chapter 18 (74% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She looked at his two sisters, and saw them making signs of derision at each other, and at Darcy, who continued, however, imperturbably grave.
    Chapter 18 (79% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • I do not mean, however, to assert that we can be justified in devoting too much of our time to music, for there are certainly other things to be attended to.
    Chapter 18 (82% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • That his two sisters and Mr. Darcy, however, should have such an opportunity of ridiculing her relations, was bad enough, and she could not determine whether the silent contempt of the gentleman, or the insolent smiles of the ladies, were more intolerable.
    Chapter 18 (88% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • This information, however, startled Mrs. Bennet; she would have been glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage him by protesting against his proposals, but she dared not believe it, and could not help saying so.
    Chapter 20 (9% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Not yet, however, in spite of her disappointment in her husband, did Mrs. Bennet give up the point.
    Chapter 20 (47% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Though her manner varied, however, her determination never did.
    Chapter 20 (51% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • To Elizabeth, however, he voluntarily acknowledged that the necessity of his absence had been self-imposed.
    Chapter 21 (12% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • After lamenting it, however, at some length, she had the consolation that Mr. Bingley would be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn, and the conclusion of all was the comfortable declaration, that though he had been invited only to a family dinner, she would take care to have two full courses.
    Chapter 21 (98% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • His reception, however, was of the most flattering kind.
    Chapter 22 (15% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Two inferences, however, were plainly deduced from the whole: one, that Elizabeth was the real cause of the mischief; and the other that she herself had been barbarously misused by them all; and on these two points she principally dwelt during the rest of the day.
    Chapter 23 (22% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • He was too happy, however, to need much attention; and luckily for the others, the business of love-making relieved them from a great deal of his company.
    Chapter 23 (78% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Had his own happiness, however, been the only sacrifice, he might have been allowed to sport with it in whatever manner he thought best, but her sister's was involved in it, as she thought he must be sensible himself.
    Chapter 24 (15% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • The pain of separation, however, might be alleviated on his side, by preparations for the reception of his bride; as he had reason to hope, that shortly after his return into Hertfordshire, the day would be fixed that was to make him the happiest of men.
    Chapter 25 (2% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • However, your coming just at this time is the greatest of comforts, and I am very glad to hear what you tell us, of long sleeves.
    Chapter 25 (29% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • My father, however, is partial to Mr. Wickham.
    Chapter 26 (13% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She accounted for it, however, by supposing that her last letter to her friend from Longbourn had by some accident been lost.
    Chapter 26 (47% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • I cannot but wonder, however, at her having any such fears now, because, if he had at all cared about me, we must have met, long ago.
    Chapter 26 (71% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Everything, however, went on smoothly, and was finally settled according to Charlotte's first sketch.
    Chapter 27 (12% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was reasonable, however, to hope that they would not continue long.
    Chapter 27 (50% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • This, however, was no evil to Elizabeth, and upon the whole she spent her time comfortably enough; there were half-hours of pleasant conversation with Charlotte, and the weather was so fine for the time of year that she had often great enjoyment out of doors.
    Chapter 30 (46% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • At length, however, his civility was so far awakened as to inquire of Elizabeth after the health of her family.
    Chapter 30 (91% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was some days, however, before they received any invitation thither—for while there were visitors in the house, they could not be necessary; and it was not till Easter-day, almost a week after the gentlemen's arrival, that they were honoured by such an attention, and then they were merely asked on leaving church to come there in the evening.
    Chapter 31 (2% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She seems perfectly happy, however, and in a prudential light it is certainly a very good match for her.
    Chapter 32 (37% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
    Chapter 33 (82% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She tried, however, to compose herself to answer him with patience, when he should have done.
    Chapter 34 (28% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It has been most unconsciously done, however, and I hope will be of short duration.
    Chapter 34 (37% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Perhaps this concealment, this disguise was beneath me; it is done, however, and it was done for the best.
    Chapter 35 (54% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She was not sorry, however, to have the recital of them interrupted by the lady from whom they sprang.
    Chapter 38 (52% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • You do not blame me, however, for refusing him?
    Chapter 40 (11% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was some time, however, before a smile could be extorted from Jane.
    Chapter 40 (24% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was not in her nature, however, to increase her vexations by dwelling on them.
    Chapter 41 (51% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Elizabeth, however, had never been blind to the impropriety of her father's behaviour as a husband.
    Chapter 42 (11% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • At length however, the question was asked by her uncle; and she turned away with alarm, while Mrs. Reynolds replied that he was, adding, "But we expect him to-morrow, with a large party of friends."
    Chapter 43 (12% in)
  • At length, however, the remarks of her companions on her absence of mind aroused her, and she felt the necessity of appearing more like herself.
    Chapter 43 (57% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • The introduction, however, was immediately made; and as she named their relationship to herself, she stole a sly look at him, to see how he bore it, and was not without the expectation of his decamping as fast as he could from such disgraceful companions.
    Chapter 43 (70% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • That he was surprised by the connection was evident; he sustained it, however, with fortitude, and so far from going away, turned his back with them, and entered into conversation with Mr. Gardiner.
    Chapter 43 (71% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Her astonishment, however, was extreme, and continually was she repeating, "Why is he so altered?
    Chapter 43 (74% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Presuming however, that this studied avoidance spoke rather a momentary embarrassment than any dislike of the proposal, and seeing in her husband, who was fond of society, a perfect willingness to accept it, she ventured to engage for her attendance, and the day after the next was fixed on.
    Chapter 44 (58% in)
  • There was now an interest, however, in believing the housekeeper; and they soon became sensible that the authority of a servant who had known him since he was four years old, and whose own manners indicated respectability, was not to be hastily rejected.
    Chapter 44 (71% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was acknowledged, however, that he was a liberal man, and did much good among the poor.
    Chapter 44 (75% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Mrs. Gardiner and her niece, however, did her justice, and pitied her.
    Chapter 45 (11% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Elizabeth's collected behaviour, however, soon quieted his emotion; and as Miss Bingley, vexed and disappointed, dared not approach nearer to Wickham, Georgiana also recovered in time, though not enough to be able to speak any more.
    Chapter 45 (63% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • He was resolutely silent, however, and, from a determination of making him speak, she continued: "I remember, when we first knew her in Hertfordshire, how amazed we all were to find that she was a reputed beauty; and I particularly recollect your saying one night, after they had been dining at Netherfield, 'She a beauty!
    Chapter 45 (87% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • To Kitty, however, it does not seem so wholly unexpected.
    Chapter 46 (8% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • I grieve to find, however, that Colonel F. is not disposed to depend upon their marriage; he shook his head when I expressed my hopes, and said he fear W. was not a man to be trusted.
    Chapter 46 (29% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • I am not so selfish, however, as to press for it, if inconvenient.
    Chapter 46 (33% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • An hour, however, saw the whole completed; and Mr. Gardiner meanwhile having settled his account at the inn, nothing remained to be done but to go; and Elizabeth, after all the misery of the morning, found herself, in a shorter space of time than she could have supposed, seated in the carriage, and on the road to Longbourn.
    Chapter 46 (98% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Her sister, however, assured her of her being perfectly well; and their conversation, which had been passing while Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner were engaged with their children, was now put an end to by the approach of the whole party.
    Chapter 47 (41% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • The sanguine hope of good, however, which the benevolence of her heart suggested had not yet deserted her; she still expected that it would all end well, and that every morning would bring some letter, either from Lydia or her father, to explain their proceedings, and, perhaps, announce their marriage.
    Chapter 47 (44% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • The faces of both, however, were tolerably calm; and no change was visible in either, except that the loss of her favourite sister, or the anger which she had herself incurred in this business, had given more of fretfulness than usual to the accents of Kitty.
    Chapter 47 (62% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Mary, however, continued to console herself with such kind of moral extractions from the evil before them.
    Chapter 47 (67% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It was possible, however, that some of his companions in the ——shire might be able to give more information; and though she was not very sanguine in expecting it, the application was a something to look forward to.
    Chapter 48 (32% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • There were few people on whose secrecy she would have more confidently depended; but, at the same time, there was no one whose knowledge of a sister's frailty would have mortified her so much—not, however, from any fear of disadvantage from it individually to herself, for, at any rate, there seemed a gulf impassable between them.
    Chapter 50 (52% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Elizabeth was surprised, however, that Wickham should consent to such a scheme, and had she consulted only her own inclination, any meeting with him would have been the last object of her wishes.
    Chapter 50 (99% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • However, I did not hear above one word in ten, for I was thinking, you may suppose, of my dear Wickham.
    Chapter 51 (69% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • To be sure London was rather thin, but, however, the Little Theatre was open.
    Chapter 51 (74% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • However, I recollected afterwards that if he had been prevented going, the wedding need not be put off, for Mr. Darcy might have done as well.
    Chapter 51 (78% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Don't think me angry, however, for I only mean to let you know that I had not imagined such inquiries to be necessary on your side.
    Chapter 52 (4% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • At length, however, our kind friend procured the wished-for direction.
    Chapter 52 (20% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Under such circumstances, however, he was not likely to be proof against the temptation of immediate relief.
    Chapter 52 (30% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • But, however, he is very welcome to come to Netherfield, if he likes it.
    Chapter 53 (15% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • But, however, that shan't prevent my asking him to dine here, I am determined.
    Chapter 53 (34% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • People did say you meant to quit the place entirely at Michaelmas; but, however, I hope it is not true.
    Chapter 53 (75% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • It drew from her, however, the exertion of speaking, which nothing else had so effectually done before; and she asked Bingley whether he meant to make any stay in the country at present.
    Chapter 53 (84% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • She was a little revived, however, by his bringing back his coffee cup himself; and she seized the opportunity of saying: "Is your sister at Pemberley still?"
    Chapter 54 (58% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • He stood by her, however, for some minutes, in silence; and, at last, on the young lady's whispering to Elizabeth again, he walked away.
    Chapter 54 (63% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Seriously, however, she felt tolerably persuaded that all this must have taken place with that gentleman's concurrence.
    Chapter 55 (29% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Not a word, however, passed his lips in allusion to it, till their visitor took his leave for the night; but as soon as he was gone, he turned to his daughter, and said: "Jane, I congratulate you.
    Chapter 55 (63% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • As it was certain, however, that somebody was coming, Bingley instantly prevailed on Miss Bennet to avoid the confinement of such an intrusion, and walk away with him into the shrubbery.
    Chapter 56 (4% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • In revolving Lady Catherine's expressions, however, she could not help feeling some uneasiness as to the possible consequence of her persisting in this interference.
    Chapter 57 (12% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • I must not, however, neglect the duties of my station, or refrain from declaring my amazement at hearing that you received the young couple into your house as soon as they were married.
    Chapter 57 (79% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Bingley and Jane, however, soon allowed the others to outstrip them.
    Chapter 58 (4% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Another entreaty that she would be serious, however, produced the desired effect; and she soon satisfied Jane by her solemn assurances of attachment.
    Chapter 59 (24% in)
  • however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
  • Any place would do, of about three or four hundred a year; but however, do not speak to Mr. Darcy about it, if you had rather not.
    Chapter 61 (47% in)
  • Such relief, however, as it was in her power to afford, by the practice of what might be called economy in her own private expences, she frequently sent them.
    Chapter 61 (51% in)
however = a word used to connect contrasting ideas as when using though, in spite of that, in contrast, nevertheless, etc.
There are no more uses of "however" flagged with this meaning in Pride and Prejudice.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —5 uses as in:
However much she tried...
Definition
to whatever degree (regardless of how much; or whatever unspecified amount)
  • However little Mr. Darcy might have liked such an address, he contented himself with coolly replying that he perceived no other alteration than her being rather tanned, no miraculous consequence of travelling in the summer.
    Chapter 45 (76% in)
however = regardless of how
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.
    Chapter 1 (4% in)
  • however = regardless of how
  • The two youngest of the family, Catherine and Lydia, were particularly frequent in these attentions; their minds were more vacant than their sisters', and when nothing better offered, a walk to Meryton was necessary to amuse their morning hours and furnish conversation for the evening; and however bare of news the country in general might be, they always contrived to learn some from their aunt.
    Chapter 7 (10% in)
  • however = regardless of how
  • She lost all concern for him in finding herself thus selected as the object of such idle and frivolous gallantry; and while she steadily repressed it, could not but feel the reproof contained in his believing, that however long, and for whatever cause, his attentions had been withdrawn, her vanity would be gratified, and her preference secured at any time by their renewal.
    Chapter 41 (68% in)
  • It may be easily believed, that however little of novelty could be added to their fears, hopes, and conjectures, on this interesting subject, by its repeated discussion, no other could detain them from it long, during the whole of the journey.
    Chapter 47 (32% in)
however = regardless of how
There are no more uses of "however" flagged with this meaning in Pride and Prejudice.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —12 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • But however insincere you may choose to be, you shall not find me so.
    Chapter 56 (29% in)
  • You can hardly doubt the purport of my discourse, however your natural delicacy may lead you to dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken.
    Chapter 19 (21% in)
  • But the fact is, that being, as I am, to inherit this estate after the death of your honoured father (who, however, may live many years longer), I could not satisfy myself without resolving to choose a wife from among his daughters, that the loss to them might be as little as possible, when the melancholy event takes place—which, however, as I have already said, may not be for several years.
    Chapter 19 (43% in)
  • But the fact is, that being, as I am, to inherit this estate after the death of your honoured father (who, however, may live many years longer), I could not satisfy myself without resolving to choose a wife from among his daughters, that the loss to them might be as little as possible, when the melancholy event takes place—which, however, as I have already said, may not be for several years.
    Chapter 19 (45% in)
  • It appeared to her merely the suggestion of Caroline's interested wishes, and she could not for a moment suppose that those wishes, however openly or artfully spoken, could influence a young man so totally independent of everyone.
    Chapter 21 (90% in)
  • Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
    Chapter 22 (38% in)
  • Such a circumstance could only exasperate farther, and, when he ceased, the colour rose into her cheeks, and she said: "In such cases as this, it is, I believe, the established mode to express a sense of obligation for the sentiments avowed, however unequally they may be returned.
    Chapter 34 (34% in)
  • But I shall not scruple to assert, that the serenity of your sister's countenance and air was such as might have given the most acute observer a conviction that, however amiable her temper, her heart was not likely to be easily touched.
    Chapter 35 (33% in)
  • But, however this remonstrance might have staggered or delayed his determination, I do not suppose that it would ultimately have prevented the marriage, had it not been seconded by the assurance that I hesitated not in giving, of your sister's indifference.
    Chapter 35 (47% in)
  • Elizabeth was shocked to think that, however incapable of such coarseness of expression herself, the coarseness of the sentiment was little other than her own breast had harboured and fancied liberal!
    Chapter 39 (38% in)
  • Elizabeth, however astonished, was at least more prepared for an interview than before, and resolved to appear and to speak with calmness, if he really intended to meet them.
    Chapter 43 (65% in)
  • It was not often that she could turn her eyes on Mr. Darcy himself; but, whenever she did catch a glimpse, she saw an expression of general complaisance, and in all that he said she heard an accent so removed from hauteur or disdain of his companions, as convinced her that the improvement of manners which she had yesterday witnessed however temporary its existence might prove, had at least outlived one day.
    Chapter 44 (47% in)

There are no more uses of "however" in Pride and Prejudice.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®