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oppress
used in Unbroken by Hillenbrand

2 meanings, 5 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
oppressive government
Definition
to dominate harshly and unfairly; or to make suffer
The meaning of oppress depends upon its context. For example:
  • "The authorities oppress political activists," or "The new nation oppressed Native Americans." — to dominate harshly and unfairly
  • "She is oppressed by excessive debt." - made to suffer
  • It is thus unsurprising that camp guards, occupying the lowest station in a military that applauded brutality, would vent their frustrations on the helpless men under their authority. Japanese historians call this phenomenon "transfer of oppression."
    p. 194.9
oppression = harsh and unfair treatment

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • In 1931, Japan tested the waters, invading the Chinese province of Manchuria and setting up a fiercely oppressive puppet state.
    p. 43.8
oppressive = harsh and unfair

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
There are no more uses of "oppress" flagged with this meaning in Unbroken by Hillenbrand.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —3 uses as in:
oppressive heat
Definition
to make uncomfortable (weigh heavily on the senses or spirit)
  • An oppressive weight settled on Louie as he flew away from Funafuti.
    p. 112.2
oppressive = uncomfortable (weighing heavily on the senses or spirit)

(editor's note:  Leading up to this, Hillenbrand wrote, "Pillsbury, Lambert, and Douglas were too badly wounded to rejoin the crew. In a few days, they'd be sent to Samoa, where a doctor would take one look at Pillsbury's leg and announce that it had been 'hamburgered.' Lambert would be hospitalized for five months. When a general presented him with a Purple Heart, Lambert apparently couldn't sit up, so the general pinned the medal to his sheet. Douglas's war was done. Brooks was lying in a grave in Funafuti's Marine Corps cemetery. The crew was broken up forever.")
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The cockpit was oppressively cramped, forcing pilot and copilot to live cheek by jowl for missions as long as sixteen hours.
    p. 59.4
  • oppressively = uncomfortably
  • The air hung hot and still, oppressive with the stench of human waste.
    p. 174.9
oppressive = uncomfortable (weighing heavily on the senses or spirit)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
There are no more uses of "oppress" flagged with this meaning in Unbroken by Hillenbrand.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®