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discriminate
used in The Souls of Black Folk

14 uses
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1  —4 uses as in:
discriminating taste
Definition
to recognize or perceive differences — especially fine distinctions
  • First, it is the duty of black men to judge the South discriminatingly.
    Chapter 3 (80% in)
  • But, nevertheless, they insist that the way to truth and right lies in straightforward honesty, not in indiscriminate flattery; in praising those of the South who do well and criticising uncompromisingly those who do ill; in taking advantage of the opportunities at hand and urging their fellows to do the same, but at the same time in remembering that only a firm adherence to their higher ideals and aspirations will ever keep those ideals within the realm of possibility.
    Chapter 3 (71% in)
  • Furthermore, to no class is the indiscriminate endorsement of the recent course of the South toward Negroes more nauseating than to the best thought of the South.
    Chapter 3 (81% in)
  • I have seen twelve-year-old boys working in chains on the public streets of Atlanta, directly in front of the schools, in company with old and hardened criminals; and this indiscriminate mingling of men and women and children makes the chain-gangs perfect schools of crime and debauchery.
    Chapter 9 (66% in)

There are no more uses of "discriminate" flagged with this meaning in The Souls of Black Folk.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —10 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • He bent to all the gibes and prejudices, to all hatred and discrimination, with that rare courtesy which is the armor of pure souls.
    Chapter 12 (88% in)
  • ...demands; they do not ask that ignorant black men vote when ignorant whites are debarred, or that any reasonable restrictions in the suffrage should not be applied; they know that the low social level of the mass of the race is responsible for much discrimination against it, but they also know, and the nation knows, that relentless color-prejudice is more often a cause than a result of the Negro's degradation; they seek the abatement of this relic of barbarism, and not its systematic...
    Chapter 3 (67% in)
  • ...absolutely certain that the way for a people to gain their reasonable rights is not by voluntarily throwing them away and insisting that they do not want them; that the way for a people to gain respect is not by continually belittling and ridiculing themselves; that, on the contrary, Negroes must insist continually, in season and out of season, that voting is necessary to modern manhood, that color discrimination is barbarism, and that black boys need education as well as white boys.
    Chapter 3 (75% in)
  • Discriminating and broad-minded criticism is what the South needs,—needs it for the sake of her own white sons and daughters, and for the insurance of robust, healthy mental and moral development.
    Chapter 3 (82% in)
  • To praise this intricate whirl of thought and prejudice is nonsense; to inveigh indiscriminately against "the South" is unjust; but to use the same breath in praising Governor Aycock, exposing Senator Morgan, arguing with Mr. Thomas Nelson Page, and denouncing Senator Ben Tillman, is not only sane, but the imperative duty of thinking black men.
    Chapter 3 (86% in)
  • Such misdemeanors needed discriminating treatment, firm but reformatory, with no hint of injustice, and full proof of guilt.
    Chapter 9 (60% in)
  • Thus grew up a double system of justice, which erred on the white side by undue leniency and the practical immunity of red-handed criminals, and erred on the black side by undue severity, injustice, and lack of discrimination.
    Chapter 9 (61% in)
  • I remember, one cold winter, in Atlanta, when I refrained from contributing to a public relief fund lest Negroes should be discriminated against, I afterward inquired of a friend: "Were any black people receiving aid?"
    Chapter 9 (89% in)
  • And the condition of the Negro is ever the excuse for further discrimination.
    Chapter 9 (99% in)
  • Driven from his birthright in the South by a situation at which every fibre of his more outspoken and assertive nature revolts, he finds himself in a land where he can scarcely earn a decent living amid the harsh competition and the color discrimination.
    Chapter 10 (92% in)

There are no more uses of "discriminate" in The Souls of Black Folk.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®