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Babylon
used in The Sunlight Dialogues

43 uses
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Definition
important city of ancient Mesopotamia; on the Euphrates near modern-day Baghdad
  • "In the ancient conflict of the Jews and the Babylonians," he said—but there he was cut off.
    2 — When the Exorcist Shall Go to the House of the Patient... (10% in)
  • It was another of those mysteries of luck, as if all he'd read into the Babylonian rituals was true.
    5 — Hunting Wild Asses (65% in)
  • SUNLIGHT (in the voice of a lecturer): You're familiar, I suppose, with the conflict of the Old Testament Jews and the Babylonians?
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (43% in)
  • But the Babylonians were an interesting people.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (43% in)
  • But the Babylonians saw the matter quite differently, if I'm not mistaken.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (44% in)
  • All the evidence we have—fragments, representations, clay replicas, even literary evidence—indicates that the Babylonian gods were conceived as actually residing in their images, effective only within the substance of their images.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (44% in)
  • Whichever came first, the chickens or the egg, the Assyrians, Sumerians, and Babylonians loved substance in every form—they explored their flesh, tabulated the movements of the planets, studied the chemical components of matter, followed the seasons and made the finest calendars of the ancient world.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (54% in)
  • Not Babylon!
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (59% in)
  • And so, for thousands of years, the Babylonians survived.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (60% in)
  • But I say, with the Babylonian, Faddle!
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (60% in)
  • So the Babylonians understood that a man must be physically and spiritually prosperous, and that the two had no necessary relationship.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (62% in)
  • I say this: The Babylonian gods were, to ordinary perception, brute objects.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (62% in)
  • In politics the Babylonian would assert a close but mystical connection between rulers and the mumbling gods.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (63% in)
  • One of the most remarkable differences between the Babylonian and the Hebrew mind is that the Babylonian places no value whatever on individual human life.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (67% in)
  • One of the most remarkable differences between the Babylonian and the Hebrew mind is that the Babylonian places no value whatever on individual human life.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (67% in)
  • Every Babylonian lives his life as fully as he can, but to the culture he is, himself, nothing, a unit, merely part of a physical and spiritual system.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (68% in)
  • So what would the Babylonian say about civil rights?
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (68% in)
  • The Babylonians had no science of medicine, at least nothing we'd recognize.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (68% in)
  • But I'll tell you the word from Babylon.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (74% in)
  • SUNLIGHT: Babylon.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (90% in)
  • I meant to say Babylon.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (90% in)
  • I'm Babylonian, and you, you're one of the Jews.
    7 — The Dialogue on Wood and Stone (94% in)
  • His mind wandered vaguely to the Babylonian puppets, and he frowned.
    9 — "Like a robber, I shall proceed according to my will." (77% in)
  • On the wall there behind you, those are Babylonian figures for the twelve houses—astrological houses.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (60% in)
  • They have words for it in Old Babylonian, Sumerian, the rest.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (68% in)
  • The Babylonian would say it consists, first, in stubbornly maintaining one's freedom to act—in my case, evasion of the police, you see—and, second, in jumping when the Spirit says, "Jump!"
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (70% in)
  • There's an old Mesopotamian story, very famous—it's one of the Naram-Sin legends; survives not only in texts from Nineveh and Harran but in Old Babylonian too.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (71% in)
  • According to the Babylonians, the greatest responsibility is to remain absolutely free.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (72% in)
  • In the sexual sphere, from the ancient Babylonian point of view, one must never marry, or else one must maintain one's sexual independence in marriage.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (72% in)
  • Perhaps the Babylonians were right.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (73% in)
  • It does not lead home to Babylon, but it may make Babylon once again a live option.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (77% in)
  • It does not lead home to Babylon, but it may make Babylon once again a live option.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (77% in)
  • So it was in ancient Babylon.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (77% in)
  • So this: Babylon is fallen, but so is Israel.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (78% in)
  • Here the Babylonian imperative that one remain free raised even more difficult problems, as you can see.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (78% in)
  • Compare the Babylonian and the Israelite ways of assimilating the foreign.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (78% in)
  • The Babylonian asked nothing but token acceptance of ruler and gods.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (79% in)
  • Rome proved later the wisdom of the ancient Babylonian choice, though Babylon itself was overcome by the furious stubbornness of Jews not yet gone soft, true fire-eaters—if you'll forgive it.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (79% in)
  • Rome proved later the wisdom of the ancient Babylonian choice, though Babylon itself was overcome by the furious stubbornness of Jews not yet gone soft, true fire-eaters—if you'll forgive it.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (79% in)
  • Babylon has fallen, and Troy has fallen, and no trace remains of the work of the greatest of sculptors.
    11 — The Dialogue of Houses (82% in)
  • In Babylon—I leap to essentials—personal immortality is a mad goal.
    15 — The Dialogue of the Dead (87% in)
  • The pursuit of Youth is ridiculous, the Babylonian says.
    15 — The Dialogue of the Dead (87% in)
  • SUNLIGHT: The towers of Babylon!
    21 — The Dialogue of Towers (49% in)

There are no more uses of "Babylon" in The Sunlight Dialogues.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia:  BabylonWikipedia:  7 Wonders of the WorldWikipedia:  Hanging Gardens of BabylonGoogle Images - BabylonG. Images: Hanging Gardens of Babylon