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catholic
used in A Prayer for Owen Meany

47 uses
  • When I met the Missus, when she .... conceived Owen .... there wasn't no Catholic in Concord we could even talk to!
    p. 546.4
  • Owen said the pressure to confess— as a Catholic—was so great that he'd often made things up in order to be forgiven for them.
    p. 24.5
  • It was apparently enough revenge upon the Catholics to be sending Owen there; either the added defiance of his own attendance was unnecessary, or else Mr. Meany had suffered such an outrage at the hands of the Catholic authorities that he was rendered unreceptive to the teachings of any church.
    p. 28.7
  • "DIEM IS A CATHOLIC," Owen Meany announced.
    p. 93.6
  • "WHAT'S A CATHOLIC DOING AS PRESIDENT OF A COUNTRY OF BUDDHISTS?"
    p. 93.6
  • Grandmother meant the Catholic priesthood; yet I know that one of the things that upset her about the possibility of Mother's moving herself and me to the Episcopal Church was that Episcopalians had priests and bishops—and even "low" Episcopalians were much more like Catholics than like Congregationalists, in her opinion.
    p. 111.2
  • There were not only those differences I've already mentioned— of an atmospheric and architectural nature, together with those ecclesiastical differences that made the Episcopal service much more Catholic than the Congregational service—CATHOLIC, WITH A BIG C, as Owen would say.
    p. 113.5
  • There were not only those differences I've already mentioned— of an atmospheric and architectural nature, together with those ecclesiastical differences that made the Episcopal service much more Catholic than the Congregational service—CATHOLIC, WITH A BIG C, as Owen would say.
    p. 113.5
  • Possibly Buzzy wasn't there because he was Catholic; Owen suggested this, but there were other Catholics in attendance—Owen was simply expressing his particular prejudice.
    p. 132.2
  • I really didn't dislike Buzzy—especially after he spoke up for Owen, when Owen and I got ourselves in hot water with some of Buzzy's Catholic classmates because of a little incident at St. Michael's, the parochial school.
    p. 132.7
  • Canon Campbell used to explain everything to me—the part about believing in "One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church" bothered me; Canon Campbell helped me see beyond the words, he made me see in what sense "Catholic," in what way "Apostolic."
    p. 148.5
  • Canon Campbell used to explain everything to me—the part about believing in "One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church" bothered me; Canon Campbell helped me see beyond the words, he made me see in what sense "Catholic," in what way "Apostolic."
    p. 148.6
  • She was crossing herself, repeatedly—a helpless, unthinking, Catholic gesture; it must have infuriated Owen.
    p. 224.4
  • Meany, Jr.; he'd been baptized a Catholic.
    p. 258.9
  • "THAT'S SO CATHOLIC," he added—"TO GET VERY RELIGIOUS ABOUT OBJECTS."
    p. 274.4
  • Of course, no Catholic would have fired a ball or a puck or any other missile at her; if the parochial students themselves were tempted, the grim, alert presence of the nuns would have discouraged them.
    p. 275.4
  • And although the Gravesend Catholic Church was in another part of town, the shabby saltbox where the nuns and some other teachers at St. Michael's lived was positioned like a guardhouse at a corner of the playground—in full view of Mary Magdalene.
    p. 275.5
  • WHY DO WE HAVE A CATHOLIC DINING HALL?
    p. 306.3
  • ARE WE ALL FORCED TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE CATHOLIC VIEW OF BIRTH CONTROL?
    p. 306.7
  • WHY ARE WE FORCED TO EAT CATHOLIC FOOD?
    p. 306.7
  • He wanted a Catholic!
    p. 338.7
  • He thought that Kennedy was religious, and—incredibly—he didn't mind that Kennedy was a Catholic.
    p. 342.0
  • "—I had been no more successful with Police Chief Ben Pike's daughter, Lorna, who was not Catholic, and not wearing a uniform of any kind when I snagged my lip on her braces.
    p. 348.3
  • "Not to mention what the Catholic Church—I mean, Saint Michael's—is going to do to him," Dan said.
    p. 411.1
  • The Rev. Mr. Merrill did not yet know why Dan wanted to know who the Catholic "head guy" was.
    p. 413.0
  • He said that Owen Meany was "so virulently antireligious" that he had "desecrated the statue of a saint at a Roman Catholic school"; that he had launched a "deeply anti-Catholic campaign" on the Gravesend campus, under the demand of not wanting a fish-only menu in the school dining hall on Fridays; and that there were "charges against him for being anti-Semitic, too."
    p. 416.3
  • He said that Owen Meany was "so virulently antireligious" that he had "desecrated the statue of a saint at a Roman Catholic school"; that he had launched a "deeply anti-Catholic campaign" on the Gravesend campus, under the demand of not wanting a fish-only menu in the school dining hall on Fridays; and that there were "charges against him for being anti-Semitic, too."
    p. 416.3
  • Yale wanted to interview him again; they quickly saw the anti-Semitic "charges" for what they were—a lie—but Owen was undoubtedly too frank about his feelings for (or, rather, against) the Catholic Church.
    p. 416.7
  • They wanted him to work for the Catholic Church—in some capacity; he could volunteer his time for Catholic Relief Services, he could be a kind of social worker for one of the Catholic charities, or he could even work for the very same parochial school whose statue of Mary Magdalene he had ruined.
    p. 417.0
  • They wanted him to work for the Catholic Church—in some capacity; he could volunteer his time for Catholic Relief Services, he could be a kind of social worker for one of the Catholic charities, or he could even work for the very same parochial school whose statue of Mary Magdalene he had ruined.
    p. 417.0
  • They wanted him to work for the Catholic Church—in some capacity; he could volunteer his time for Catholic Relief Services, he could be a kind of social worker for one of the Catholic charities, or he could even work for the very same parochial school whose statue of Mary Magdalene he had ruined.
    p. 417.1
  • For a while, I thought Owen was going to accept the Harvard proposal—"THE CATHOLIC DEAL," he called it.
    p. 417.8
  • In the end, he would turn THE CATHOLIC DEAL down.
    p. 417.9
  • And as to my calling the period of our youth a "purgatory," Owen said simply, "THERE IS NO PURGATORY—THAT'S A CATHOLIC INVENTION.
    p. 423.6
  • It was the summer when Owen said, "WHAT'S A CATHOLIC DOING AS PRESIDENT OF A COUNTRY OF BUDDHISTS?"
    p. 442.3
  • The Catholic Church had reason to be proud of the insurmountable virtue of Caroline O'Day, with or without her St. Michael's uniform—and of the virtue of countless others, any church could be proud; they were all virtuous with me.
    p. 445.7
  • And occasionally I saw the tomato-red pickup parked at St. Michael's—not at the school, but by the curb at the rectory for St. Michael's Catholic Church!
    p. 450.9
  • I figured he was talking to Father Findley; maybe because Kennedy had been a Catholic, maybe because some kind of ongoing dialogue with Father Findley had actually been required of Owen—in lieu of his being obliged to compensate the Catholic Church for the damage done to Mary Magdalene.
    p. 451.0
  • I figured he was talking to Father Findley; maybe because Kennedy had been a Catholic, maybe because some kind of ongoing dialogue with Father Findley had actually been required of Owen—in lieu of his being obliged to compensate the Catholic Church for the damage done to Mary Magdalene.
    p. 451.1
  • "BUT THERE'S A FUNDAMENTAL LEAP OF FAITH THAT ALL HIS TRAINING—ALL THAT CATHOLIC BACKGROUND— SIMPLY CANNOT ALLOW HIM TO MAKE.
    p. 451.2
  • "Are you Catholic?" an interviewer asked her once.
    p. 522.7
  • "But the Catholic Church in Barre was no different—they made us feel like we was blasphemin' the Bible, like we was tryin' to make up our own religion, or somethin'."
    p. 546.6
  • But that they would tell him—when he was so young, and so impressionable—that is a more 'unspeakable outrage,' as Owen was always saying, than any such 'outrage' the Meanys suffered at the hands of the Catholic Church.
    p. 549.8
  • And the Catholic priest—Father Findley—he was ,there, as was Mrs. Hoyt, despite how badly the town had treated her for her "anti-American" draft-counseling activities.
    p. 568.9
  • Catholic Relief Services, for example; the Catholic Relief groups were responsible for escorting orphans out of Vietnam and relocating them in the United States—as early as the mid-sixties.
    p. 620.5
  • Catholic Relief Services, for example; the Catholic Relief groups were responsible for escorting orphans out of Vietnam and relocating them in the United States—as early as the mid-sixties.
    p. 620.5
  • The children that Owen Meany and I saw in Phoenix were being escorted by nuns from Catholic Relief Services; they were being delivered into the charge of nuns from the Phoenix Archdiocese, who would take them to new homes, and new families, in Arizona.
    p. 620.7

There are no more uses of "catholic" in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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