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stanza
used in The Magic Mountain

7 uses
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Definition
part of a poem or song that has other such parts—each part consisting of a fixed number of lines
  • The most overpowering phrase of the melody occurs three times, always in its modulating second half—the third time, then, being in the reprise of the last half-stanza that begins "And many now the hours."
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (83% in)
  • It was a strong, warm baritone, and its song was in three parts, consisting of a frame of two closely related stanzas, quite religious in nature, almost in the style of a Protestant chorale, and a middle stanza that had a gallant, chivalresque spirit, warlike, lighthearted, but equally devout—which was what gave it such a French military feel.
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (77% in)
  • It was a strong, warm baritone, and its song was in three parts, consisting of a frame of two closely related stanzas, quite religious in nature, almost in the style of a Protestant chorale, and a middle stanza that had a gallant, chivalresque spirit, warlike, lighthearted, but equally devout—which was what gave it such a French military feel.
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (77% in)
  • In the latter case, it is sung to the basic melody, usually in simplified form, one stanza after the other; whereas here the original melody is already varied in a minor key by the second of the three eight-line stanzas, reemerges very beautifully in the major by the time the third stanza begins, is then dramatically abandoned in the "cold winds" that blow your hat from your head, and only finds its way back again in the last four lines of the stanza, where it is then repeated so that...
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (82% in)
  • In the latter case, it is sung to the basic melody, usually in simplified form, one stanza after the other; whereas here the original melody is already varied in a minor key by the second of the three eight-line stanzas, reemerges very beautifully in the major by the time the third stanza begins, is then dramatically abandoned in the "cold winds" that blow your hat from your head, and only finds its way back again in the last four lines of the stanza, where it is then repeated so that...
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (82% in)
  • ...to the basic melody, usually in simplified form, one stanza after the other; whereas here the original melody is already varied in a minor key by the second of the three eight-line stanzas, reemerges very beautifully in the major by the time the third stanza begins, is then dramatically abandoned in the "cold winds" that blow your hat from your head, and only finds its way back again in the last four lines of the stanza, where it is then repeated so that the song can be sung to an end.
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (82% in)
  • ...to the basic melody, usually in simplified form, one stanza after the other; whereas here the original melody is already varied in a minor key by the second of the three eight-line stanzas, reemerges very beautifully in the major by the time the third stanza begins, is then dramatically abandoned in the "cold winds" that blow your hat from your head, and only finds its way back again in the last four lines of the stanza, where it is then repeated so that the song can be sung to an end.
    7.7 - Fullness of Harmony (83% in)

There are no more uses of "stanza" in The Magic Mountain.

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