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migrate
used in Do You Speak American?

14 uses
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Definition
move from one place to another — sometimes seasonally
  • In the 1720s, when they began migrating to America in large numbers, many landed in Philadelphia.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (5% in)
  • It is possible that Philadelphia shaped American speech more than any other city, because the "r" sound that so typifies American English migrated west from Philadelphia.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (3% in)
  • That movement began a cultural and linguistic migration that continues to this day, as we shall see, gathering power and belated prestige in both North and South.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (6% in)
  • Midland speech grew out of patterns that began in Philadelphia and migrated west through most of Pennsylvania, most of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and a large swath of America, including Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas, and northern Oklahoma, and then stretched away still farther to the west.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (35% in)
  • The people who settled on the northern side, in Indiana, migrated down the Ohio—the biggest eastern tributary of the Mississippi.
    four — This Ain't Your Mama's South Anymore (3% in)
  • But with modern bridges and roads the two sounds have migrated back and forth across the river, in what linguists call a bleedover effect, and the two dialects merge a little.
    four — This Ain't Your Mama's South Anymore (4% in)
  • It is being swept away by time and advances in civil rights and the migration of Northerners, including millions of African Americans, who are moving south to enjoy the economic growth and warmer climate, a reversal of the twentieth-century migration to the North.
    four — This Ain't Your Mama's South Anymore (20% in)
  • It is being swept away by time and advances in civil rights and the migration of Northerners, including millions of African Americans, who are moving south to enjoy the economic growth and warmer climate, a reversal of the twentieth-century migration to the North.
    four — This Ain't Your Mama's South Anymore (21% in)
  • The legacy today is a two-thousand-mile border between two nations with the largest income gap of any adjoining countries in the world, with continuing tensions over migration and, for some Americans, over language.
    five — Hispanic Immigration: Reconquest or Assimilation? (1% in)
  • People are misled into thinking that Spanish is becoming dominant because, unlike immigration by other groups, which came in waves that began and ended, the Hispanic migration is a continuous flow.
    five — Hispanic Immigration: Reconquest or Assimilation? (92% in)
  • When linguists tried systematically to match English dialect forms with patterns of colonial migration and slaveholding, the Anglicist theory fell apart.
    six — Bad-mouthing Black English (8% in)
  • By the early twentieth century, frustrated blacks began migrating north to what they called "the Promised Land."
    six — Bad-mouthing Black English (17% in)
  • These insights led Bailey and Cukor -Avila to conclude that urban black speech appeared to be diverging from rather than converging with white speech, as a result of the great black migration to the North.
    six — Bad-mouthing Black English (33% in)
  • This reverse migration began in the 1970s but accelerated in the next two decades.
    six — Bad-mouthing Black English (99% in)

There are no more uses of "migrate" in Do You Speak American?.

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