toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

Immanuel Kant
used in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

29 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
?  —3 uses
exact meaning not specified
Definition
German philosopher generally considered the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment; emphasized the categorical imperative; criticized proofs of God, but believed God's existence must be assumed by rational, moral individuals (1724-1804)
  • Or, to put it in Kantian terms, the objective world producing our sense data did not change, but our a priori concept of it was turned inside out.
    Part 2 (45% in)
  • A fragment of memory is preserved of him sitting in a room at three and four in the morning with Immanuel Kant's famous Critique of Pure Reason, studying it as a chess player studies the openings of the tournament masters, trying to test the line of development against his own judgment and skill, looking for contradictions and incongruities.
    Part 2 (38% in)
  • He didn't jump from Immanuel Kant to Bozeman, Montana.
    Part 2 (53% in)

There are no more uses of "Immanuel Kant" flagged with this meaning in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia ArticleSparkNotes on Kant
?  —26 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Are they synthetic a priori judgments, as Kant said?
    Part 3 (54% in)
  • Phaedrus is a bizarre person when contrasted to the twentieth-century Midwestern Americans who surround him, but when he is seen studying Kant he is less strange.
    Part 2 (38% in)
  • For this eighteenth-century German philosopher he feels a respect that rises not out of agreement but out of appreciation for Kant's formidable logical fortification of his position.
    Part 2 (38% in)
  • Kant is always superbly methodical, persistent, regular and meticulous as he scales that great snowy mountain of thought concerning what is in the mind and what is outside the mind.
    Part 2 (38% in)
  • It is, for modern climbers, one of the highest peaks of all, and I want now to magnify this picture of Kant and show a little about how he thought and how Phaedrus thought about him in order to give a clearer picture of what the high country of the mind is like and also to prepare the way for an understanding of Phaedrus' thoughts.
    Part 2 (39% in)
  • To follow Kant one must also understand something about the Scottish philosopher David Hume.
    Part 2 (39% in)
  • This Kant would not do.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • Thus it was Hume, Kant said, who "aroused me from my dogmatic slumbers" and caused him to write what is now regarded as one of the greatest philosophical treatises ever written, the Critique of Pure Reason, often the subject of an entire University course.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • Kant is trying to save scientific empiricism from the consequences of its own self-devouring logic.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • As a result of this difference, Kant skirts right around the abyss of solipsism that Hume's path leads to and proceeds on an entirely new and different path of his own.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • Kant says there are aspects of reality which are not supplied immediately by the senses.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • Time is what Kant calls an "intuition," which the mind must supply as it receives the sense data.
    Part 2 (41% in)
  • Now stop and apply some of the concepts Kant has put forth to this strange machine, this creation that's been bearing us along through time and space.
    Part 2 (42% in)
  • See our relation to it now, as Kant reveals it to us.
    Part 2 (42% in)
  • Kant comes to our rescue.
    Part 2 (43% in)
  • But, as Kant says, we are not that person.
    Part 2 (43% in)
  • The bulk of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason is concerned with how this a priori knowledge is acquired and how it is employed.
    Part 2 (45% in)
  • Kant called his thesis that our a priori thoughts are independent of sense data and screen what we see a "Copernican revolution."
    Part 2 (45% in)
  • Kant felt he had done the same thing in metaphysics.
    Part 2 (45% in)
  • Kant and his millions of followers have maintained that as a result of this inversion you get a much more satisfying understanding of how we know things.
    Part 2 (46% in)
  • Kant's metaphysics thrilled Phaedrus at first, but later it dragged and he didn't know exactly why.
    Part 2 (46% in)
  • He read Kant's esthetics with disappointment and then anger.
    Part 2 (46% in)
  • It seemed woven right into the whole fabric of Kant's world so deeply there was no escape from it.
    Part 2 (46% in)
  • He wished Kant were alive.
    Part 3 (23% in)
  • Kant would have appreciated it.
    Part 3 (23% in)
  • This refutation of scientific materialism, however, seemed to put him in the camp of philosophic idealism...Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Bradley, Bosanquet...good company all, logical to the last comma, but so difficult to justify in "common sense" language they seemed a burden to him in his defense of Quality rather than an aid.
    Part 3 (35% in)

There are no more uses of "Immanuel Kant" in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®