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factor
used in Blink

2 meanings, 21 uses
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1  —8 uses as in:
It was the deciding factor.
Definition
something that affects a result or outcome
  • The deciding factor is not going to be how many tanks you kill, how many ships you sink, and how many planes you shoot down.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (12% in)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The decisive factor is how you take apart your adversary's system.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (12% in)
  • The deciding factor is not going to be how many tanks you kill, how many ships you sink, and how many planes you shoot down.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (13% in)
  • The decisive factor is how you take apart your adversary's system.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (13% in)
  • His chest exam, heart exam, and ECG are normal, and his systolic blood pressure is 165, meaning it doesn't qualify as an urgent factor.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (79% in)
  • It may even be that those factors play a very subtle and complex role in increasing the odds of something happening to him in the next seventy-two hours.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (80% in)
  • What Goldman's algorithm indicates, though, is that the role of those other factors is so small in determining what is happening to the man right now that an accurate diagnosis can be made without them.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (80% in)
  • Each of those factors, in turn, is evaluated on a 15-point scale.
    Five — Kenna's Dilemma (85% in)

There are no more uses of "factor" flagged with this meaning in Blink.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —3 uses as in:
factor it into your thinking
Definition
include consideration of
  • The problem arises when the additional information of gender and race is factored into a decision about an individual patient.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (82% in)
factored = considered (for affect on a result or outcome)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Then the data from the electrodes and sensors is factored in, so that the coders know, for example, when the husband's or the wife's heart was pounding or when his or her temperature was rising or when either of them was jiggling in his or her seat, and all of that information is fed into a complex equation.
    One — The Theory of Thin Slices (10% in)
  • factored = considered (for affect on a result or outcome)
  • He constructed a rigid system that said that a young black man in a car running from the police had to be a dangerous criminal, and all evidence to the contrary that would ordinarily have been factored into his thinking—the fact that Russ was just sitting in his car and that he had never gone above seventy miles per hour—did not register at all.
    6 — Seven Seconds in the Bronx (73% in)
factored = considered (for affect on a result or outcome)
There are no more uses of "factor" flagged with this meaning in Blink.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —10 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • All those extra factors certainly matter in the long term.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (80% in)
  • And then, on the spur of the moment, Van Riper's field commanders attacked, and all of a sudden what Blue Team thought was a routine "kitchen fire" was something they could not factor into their equations at all.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (54% in)
  • Well, you probably say to yourself, This is an old guy with a lot of risk factors who's having chest pain.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (67% in)
  • Doctors, he concluded, ought to combine the evidence of the ECG with three of what he called urgent risk factors: (1) Is the pain felt by the patient unstable angina?
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (73% in)
  • For each combination of risk factors, Goldman drew up a decision tree that recommended a treatment option.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (73% in)
  • For example, a patient with a normal ECG who was positive on all three urgent risk factors would go to the intermediate unit; a patient whose ECG showed acute ischemia (that is, the heart muscle wasn't getting enough blood) but who had either one or no risk factors would be considered low-risk and go to the short-stay unit; someone with an ECG positive for ischemia and two or three risk factors would be sent directly to the cardiac care unit—and so on.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (74% in)
  • For example, a patient with a normal ECG who was positive on all three urgent risk factors would go to the intermediate unit; a patient whose ECG showed acute ischemia (that is, the heart muscle wasn't getting enough blood) but who had either one or no risk factors would be considered low-risk and go to the short-stay unit; someone with an ECG positive for ischemia and two or three risk factors would be sent directly to the cardiac care unit—and so on.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (74% in)
  • For example, a patient with a normal ECG who was positive on all three urgent risk factors would go to the intermediate unit; a patient whose ECG showed acute ischemia (that is, the heart muscle wasn't getting enough blood) but who had either one or no risk factors would be considered low-risk and go to the short-stay unit; someone with an ECG positive for ischemia and two or three risk factors would be sent directly to the cardiac care unit—and so on.
    Four — Paul Van Riper's Big Victory (74% in)
  • Scientists use something called a correlation to measure how closely one factor predicts another, and overall, the students' ratings correlated with the experts' ratings by .
    Five — Kenna's Dilemma (81% in)
  • Mayonnaise, for example, is supposed to be evaluated along six dimensions of appearance (color, color intensity, chroma, shine, lumpiness, and bubbles), ten dimensions of texture (adhesiveness to lips, firmness, denseness, and so on), and fourteen dimensions of flavor, split among three subgroups—aromatics (eggy, mustardy, and so forth); basic tastes (salty, sour, and sweet); and chemical-feeling factors (burn, pungent, astringent).
    Five — Kenna's Dilemma (85% in)

There are no more uses of "factor" in Blink.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®