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bard
used in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

27 uses
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1  —25 uses as in:
written by the bard
Definition
someone who composes and recites or sings poems about important events and people; or (as a proper noun) Shakespeare
  • we will have Demodocus to sing to us; for there is no bard like him
    Book 8 (8% in)
bard = someone who composes and recites or sings poems about important events and people; or (as a proper noun) Shakespeare
  • (endnote 9) "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mind to; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, who makes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to his own good pleasure.
    Book 1 (78% in)
  • At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, for she was of a good natural disposition; (endnote 30) moreover there was a bard with her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out for Troy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven had counselled her destruction, Aegisthus carried this bard off to a desert island and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon—after which she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus.
    Book 3 (53% in)
  • At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, for she was of a good natural disposition; (endnote 30) moreover there was a bard with her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out for Troy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven had counselled her destruction, Aegisthus carried this bard off to a desert island and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon—after which she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus.
    Book 3 (54% in)
  • There was a bard also to sing to them and play his lyre, while two tumblers went about performing in the midst of them when the man struck up with his tune.
    Book 4 (2% in)
  • A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom the muse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil, for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she had robbed him of his eyesight.
    Book 8 (10% in)
  • Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his head and covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians see that he was weeping.
    Book 8 (14% in)
  • When the bard left off singing he wiped the tears from his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made a drink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressed Demodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, then Ulysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly.
    Book 8 (15% in)
  • Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, and how they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan.
    Book 8 (46% in)
  • Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacians were charmed as they heard him.
    Book 8 (61% in)
  • A servant led in the favourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company, near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he might lean against it.
    Book 8 (79% in)
  • The bard inspired of heaven took up the story at the point where some of the Argives set fire to their tents and sailed away while others, hidden within the horse, (endnote 73) were waiting with Ulysses in the Trojan place of assembly.
    Book 8 (84% in)
  • He is evidently in great trouble, so let the bard leave off, that we may all enjoy ourselves, hosts and guest alike.
    Book 8 (91% in)
  • And Ulysses answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear a bard with such a divine voice as this man has.
    Book 9 (1% in)
  • Moreover you have told the story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as though you were a practiced bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whether you saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same time with yourself, and perished there.
    Book 11 (58% in)
  • To you others, however, who come here night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to my bard, I would insist as follows.
    Book 13 (2% in)
  • They set the steaks to grill and made an excellent dinner, after which the inspired bard, Demodocus, who was a favourite with every one, sang to them; but Ulysses kept on turning his eyes towards the sun, as though to hasten his setting, for he was longing to be on his way.
    Book 13 (7% in)
  • They have with them a servant Medon, a bard, and two men who can carve at table.
    Book 16 (53% in)
  • He went on eating it while the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as he left off.
    Book 17 (58% in)
  • The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up to Ulysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of the suitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell the good from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save a single one of them.
    Book 17 (58% in)
  • Who is likely to invite a stranger from a foreign country, unless it be one of those who can do public service as a seer, a healer of hurts, a carpenter, or a bard who can charm us with his singing?
    Book 17 (63% in)
  • But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over, strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyre and makes the twisted gut fast at both ends.
    Book 21 (93% in)
  • You will be sorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both for gods and men as I can.
    Book 22 (69% in)
  • Go, therefore, outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way of the slaughter—you and the bard—while I finish my work here inside.
    Book 22 (75% in)
  • But Medon and the bard Phemius had now woke up, and came to them from the house of Ulysses.
    Book 24 (80% in)

There are no more uses of "bard" flagged with this meaning in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —2 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork with plenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and said to a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tell him to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salute him none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout the world, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
    Book 8 (80% in)
  • (endnote 9) "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mind to; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, who makes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to his own good pleasure.
    Book 1 (78% in)

There are no more uses of "bard" in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®