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endure
used in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang)

38 uses
  • Yet he hardened his heart to endure and refrained himself.
    Book 17 (38% in)
  • In prose he may endure them, or even care to study them as the survivals of a stage of taste, which is to be found in its prime in the sagas.
    Prefaces (70% in)
  • If thou shalt hear news of the life and the returning of thy father, then verily thou mayest endure the wasting for yet a year.
    Book 1 (66% in)
  • But let thy heart and mind endure to listen, for not Odysseus only lost in Troy the day of his returning, but many another likewise perished.
    Book 1 (80% in)
  • If I shall hear news of the life and the returning of my father, then verily I may endure the wasting for yet a year; but if I shall hear that he is dead and gone, let me then return to my own dear country, and pile his mound, and over it pay burial rites full many as is due, and I will give my mother to a husband.'
    Book 2 (52% in)
  • Then Nestor of Gerenia, lord of chariots, answered him: 'My friend, since thou hast brought sorrow back to mind, behold, this is the story of the woe which we endured in that land, we sons of the Achaeans, unrestrained in fury, and of all that we bore in wanderings after spoil, sailing with our ships over the misty deep, wheresoever Achilles led; and of all our war round the mighty burg of king Priam.
    Book 3 (21% in)
  • Nay none, though thou wert to abide here for five years, ay and for six, and ask of all the ills which the goodly Achaeans then endured.
    Book 3 (23% in)
  • But now I must in any wise endure it.'
    Book 3 (42% in)
  • And Menelaus of the fair hair answered him, and said: 'Lo now, in good truth there has come unto my house the son of a friend indeed, who for my sake endured many adventures.
    Book 4 (20% in)
  • He spake, and departed through the house of Odysseus, and on her fell a cloud of consuming grief; so that she might no more endure to seat her on a chair, whereof there were many in the house, but there she crouched on the threshold of her well-builded chamber, wailing piteously, and her handmaids round her made low moan, as many as were in the house with her, young and old.
    Book 4 (85% in)
  • Yea, and if some god shall wreck me in the wine-dark deep, even so I will endure, with a heart within me patient of affliction.
    Book 5 (45% in)
  • So long as the timbers abide in the dowels, so long will I endure steadfast in affliction, but so soon as the wave hath shattered my raft asunder, I will swim, for meanwhile no better counsel may be.'
    Book 5 (74% in)
  • Then Nausicaa of the white arms answered him, and said: 'Stranger, forasmuch as thou seemest no evil man nor foolish—and it is Olympian Zeus himself that giveth weal to men, to the good and to the evil, to each one as he will, and this thy lot doubtless is of him, and so thou must in anywise endure it:—and now, since thou hast come to our city and our land, thou shalt not lack raiment, nor aught else that is the due of a hapless suppliant, when he has met them who can befriend him.
    Book 6 (59% in)
  • The fruit of these trees never perisheth neither faileth, winter nor summer, enduring through all the year.
    Book 7 (34% in)
  • So shall he suffer no hurt or harm in mid passage, ere he set foot on his own land; but thereafter he shall endure such things as Fate and the stern spinning women drew off the spindles for him at his birth when his mother bare him.
    Book 7 (57% in)
  • Yea, and I might tell of yet other woes, even the long tale of toil that by the gods' will I endured.
    Book 7 (62% in)
  • Sorrow is far nearer my heart than sports, for much have I endured and laboured sorely in time past, and now I sit in this your gathering, craving my return, and making my prayer to the king and all the people.'
    Book 8 (27% in)
  • I am not all unversed in sports, as thy words go, but methinks I was among the foremost while as yet I trusted in my youth and my hands, but now am I holden in misery and pains: for I have endured much in passing through the wars of men and the grievous waves of the sea.
    Book 8 (32% in)
  • But may the gods grant thee to see thy wife and to come to thine own country, for all too long has thou endured affliction away from thy friends.'
    Book 8 (70% in)
  • And the violent blast seized my men, and bare them towards the high seas weeping, away from their own country; but as for me, I awoke and communed with my great heart, whether I should cast myself from the ship and perish in the deep, or endure in silence and abide yet among the living.
    Book 10 (10% in)
  • Howbeit I hardened my heart to endure, and muffling my head I lay still in the ship.
    Book 10 (11% in)
  • Then she stood near me, that fair goddess, and spake saying: ' "Son of Laertes, of the seed of Zeus, Odysseus of many devices, no more now wake this plenteous weeping: myself I know of all the pains ye endured upon the teeming deep, and the great despite done you by unkindly men upon the land.
    Book 10 (81% in)
  • Howbeit let the stranger, for all his craving to return, nevertheless endure to abide until the morrow, till I make up the full measure of the gift; and men shall care for his convoy, all men, but I in chief, for mine is the lordship in the land.'
    Book 11 (54% in)
  • I could abide even till the bright dawn, so long as thou couldst endure to rehearse me these woes of thine in the hall.'
    Book 11 (58% in)
  • And anon he knew me when his eyes beheld me, and making lament he spake unto me winged words: ' "Son of Laertes, of the seed of Zeus, Odysseus of many devices: ah! wretched one, dost thou too lead such a life of evil doom, as I endured beneath the rays of the sun?
    Book 11 (97% in)
  • Now he would have despoiled me of all that booty of Troy, for the which I had endured pain of heart, in passing through the wars of men, and the grievous waves of the sea, for this cause that I would not do a favour to his father, and make me his squire in the land of the Trojans, but commanded other fellowship of mine own.
    Book 13 (60% in)
  • But do thou harden thy heart, for so it must be, and tell none neither man nor woman of all the folk, that thou hast indeed returned from wandering, but in silence endure much sorrow, submitting thee to the despite of men.'
    Book 13 (71% in)
  • But come with me, let us to the inner steading, old man, that when thy heart is satisfied with bread and wine, thou too mayest tell thy tale and declare whence thou art, and how many woes thou hast endured.'
    Book 14 (9% in)
  • For there is no other thing more mischievous to men than roaming; yet for their cursed belly's need men endure sore distress, to whom come wandering and tribulation and pain.
    Book 15 (63% in)
  • Then Odysseus, of the seed of Zeus, answered him saying: 'Eumaeus, verily thou hast stirred my heart within me with the tale of all these things, of all the sorrow of heart thou hast endured.
    Book 15 (88% in)
  • And if they shall evil entreat me in the house, let thy heart harden itself to endure while I am shamefully handled, yea even if they drag me by the feet through the house to the doors, or cast at me and smite me: still do thou bear the sight.
    Book 16 (57% in)
  • For even if they are minded to wait the throned Dawn, they shall not outstay me, so long enduring am I.' So he spake, but they laughed and looked one at the other.
    Book 18 (74% in)
  • Then he smote upon his breast and rebuked his own heart, saying: 'Endure, my heart; yea, a baser thing thou once didst bear, on that day when the Cyclops, unrestrained in fury, devoured the mighty men of my company; but still thou didst endure till thy craft found a way for thee forth from out the cave, where thou thoughtest to die.'
    Book 20 (5% in)
  • Then he smote upon his breast and rebuked his own heart, saying: 'Endure, my heart; yea, a baser thing thou once didst bear, on that day when the Cyclops, unrestrained in fury, devoured the mighty men of my company; but still thou didst endure till thy craft found a way for thee forth from out the cave, where thou thoughtest to die.'
    Book 20 (5% in)
  • But as needs we must, we still endure to see these deeds, while sheep are slaughtered and wine drunken and bread devoured, for hard it is for one man to restrain many.
    Book 20 (79% in)
  • But come, no longer work me harm out of an evil heart; but if ye be set on slaying me, even me, with the sword, even that would I rather endure, and far better would it be to die than to witness for ever these unseemly deeds—strangers shamefully entreated, and men haling the handmaidens in foul wise through the fair house.'
    Book 20 (80% in)
  • The fair lady spoke of all that she had endured in the halls at the sight of the ruinous throng of wooers, who for her sake slew many cattle, kine and goodly sheep; and many a cask of wine was broached.
    Book 23 (81% in)
  • Yet for a while he hardened his heart to endure both the hurlings and the evil words in his own halls; but at the last, when the spirit of Zeus, lord of the aegis, aroused him, by the help of Telemachus he took up all the goodly weapons, and laid them by in the inner chamber and drew the bolts.
    Book 24 (29% in)

There are no more uses of "endure" in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang).

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