toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

parish
used in Of Human Bondage

17 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
a local church community

or in Louisiana:  a jurisdiction of government like a county
  • He really seemed to look upon himself as the most important person in the parish.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (55% in)
  • Shopping in Blackstable was not a simple matter; for dissent, helped by the fact that the parish church was two miles from the town, was very common; and it was necessary to deal only with churchgoers; Mrs. Carey knew perfectly that the vicarage custom might make all the difference to a tradesman's faith.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (46% in)
  • He kept the parish accounts, arranged the treats for the choir and the schools; though there was no organ in the parish church, it was generally considered (in Blackstable) that the choir he led was the best in Kent; and when there was any ceremony, such as a visit from the Bishop for confirmation or from the Rural Dean to preach at the Harvest Thanksgiving, he made the necessary preparations.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (52% in)
  • He kept the parish accounts, arranged the treats for the choir and the schools; though there was no organ in the parish church, it was generally considered (in Blackstable) that the choir he led was the best in Kent; and when there was any ceremony, such as a visit from the Bishop for confirmation or from the Rural Dean to preach at the Harvest Thanksgiving, he made the necessary preparations.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (52% in)
  • He reminded Josiah Graves that parson meant person, that is, the vicar was the person of the parish.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (62% in)
  • Then Mr. Carey said that if Josiah Graves set foot in what was little better than a heathen temple he was not fit to be churchwarden in a Christian parish.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (66% in)
  • When Mrs. Carey had finished her business with the banker, she generally went upstairs to have a little chat with his sister; and while the ladies talked of parish matters, the curate or the new bonnet of Mrs. Wilson, Mr. Wilson was the richest man in Blackstable, he was thought to have at least five hundred a year, and he had married his cook, Philip sat demurely in the stiff parlour, used only to receive visitors, and busied himself with the restless movements of goldfish in a bowl.
    5-6 — Chapters 5-6 (73% in)
  • Mr. Carey was accustomed to say that he was the only man in his parish who worked seven days a week.
    7-8 — Chapters 7-8 (1% in)
  • He would willingly have made the service more ornate than had been usual in the low-church parish of Blackstable, and in his secret soul he yearned for processions and lighted candles.
    7-8 — Chapters 7-8 (56% in)
  • ...but eminent lawyers are common, and one or two soldiers of distinction; but during the three centuries since its separation from the monastic order it had trained especially men of the church, bishops, deans, canons, and above all country clergymen: there were boys in the school whose fathers, grandfathers, great-grandfathers, had been educated there and had all been rectors of parishes in the diocese of Tercanbury; and they came to it with their minds made up already to be ordained.
    15-16 — Chapters 15-16 (5% in)
  • Two or three curates who had hoped for preferment told their wives it was scandalous to give a parish that needed a young, strong, and energetic man to an old fellow who knew nothing of parochial work, and had feathered his nest already; but the mutterings of the unbeneficed clergy do not reach the ears of a cathedral Chapter.
    15-16 — Chapters 15-16 (18% in)
  • There was the Vicar of Whitestone, a parish a little way from Blackstable: he was a bachelor and to give himself something to do had lately taken up farming: the local paper constantly reported the cases he had in the county court against this one and that, labourers he would not pay their wages to or tradesmen whom he accused of cheating him; scandal said he starved his cows, and there was much talk about some general action which should be taken against him.
    19-20 — Chapters 19-20 (92% in)
  • He thought of the collects and epistles which he had been made to learn by heart, and the long services at the Cathedral through which he had sat when every limb itched with the desire for movement; and he remembered those walks at night through muddy roads to the parish church at Blackstable, and the coldness of that bleak building; he sat with his feet like ice, his fingers numb and heavy, and all around was the sickly odour of pomatum.
    27-28 — Chapters 27-28 (81% in)
  • There was a pause, and then the conversation drifted to parish matters.
    51-52 — Chapters 51-52 (68% in)
  • The awful fear seized him that his uncle, notwithstanding his promises, might leave everything he had to the parish or the church.
    105-106 — Chapters 105-106 (25% in)
  • Philip, asking after the affairs of the parish, looked at him and wondered how much longer he could last.
    107-108 — Chapters 107-108 (52% in)
  • He's led a very good life, he's done his duty, he's been a good parish priest, and I'm sure we shall all miss him; he can't have anything to reproach himself with.
    111-112 — Chapters 111-112 (21% in)

There are no more uses of "parish" in Of Human Bondage.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article