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squalor
used in Of Human Bondage

3 uses
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Definition
(describing a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant — typically due to poverty
  • The life of Paris had got into his bones, and he would not change it, notwithstanding its squalor, drudgery, and hardship, for any other in the world.
    45-46 — Chapters 45-46 (10% in)
  • His soul danced with joy at that picture of starvation which is so good-humoured, of squalor which is so picturesque, of sordid love which is so romantic, of bathos which is so moving.
    33-34 — Chapters 33-34 (19% in)
  • He felt vaguely that here was something better than the realism which he had adored; but certainly it was not the bloodless idealism which stepped aside from life in weakness; it was too strong; it was virile; it accepted life in all its vivacity, ugliness and beauty, squalor and heroism; it was realism still; but it was realism carried to some higher pitch, in which facts were transformed by the more vivid light in which they were seen.
    87-88 — Chapters 87-88 (96% in)

There are no more uses of "squalor" in Of Human Bondage.

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