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therefore
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

212 uses
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Definition
for that reason (what follows is so because of what was just said)
  • Consider, therefore, whether or no you will protect me.
    Book 1 (15% in)
  • With all sincerity and goodwill he addressed them thus:— "Achilles, loved of heaven, you bid me tell you about the anger of King Apollo, I will therefore do so; but consider first and swear that you will stand by me heartily in word and deed, for I know that I shall offend one who rules the Argives with might, to whom all the Achaeans are in subjection.
    Book 1 (14% in)
  • "The god," he said, "is angry neither about vow nor hecatomb, but for his priest's sake, whom Agamemnon has dishonoured, in that he would not free his daughter nor take a ransom for her; therefore has he sent these evils upon us, and will yet send others.
    Book 1 (17% in)
  • Give this girl, therefore, to the god, and if ever Jove grants us to sack the city of Troy we will requite you three and fourfold.
    Book 1 (22% in)
  • Now, therefore, I shall go back to Phthia; it will be much better for me to return home with my ships, for I will not stay here dishonoured to gather gold and substance for you.
    Book 1 (28% in)
  • Hold, therefore, and obey.
    Book 1 (35% in)
  • Therefore I say, and swear it with a great oath—nay, by this my sceptre which shalt sprout neither leaf nor shoot, nor bud anew from the day on which it left its parent stem upon the mountains—for the axe stripped it of leaf and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans bear it as judges and guardians of the decrees of heaven—so surely and solemnly do I swear that hereafter they shall look fondly for Achilles and shall not find him.
    Book 1 (38% in)
  • With all sincerity and goodwill, therefore, he addressed them thus:— "Of a truth," he said, "a great sorrow has befallen the Achaean land.
    Book 1 (41% in)
  • I am older than either of you; therefore be guided by me.
    Book 1 (42% in)
  • Therefore, Agamemnon, though you be strong, take not this girl away, for the sons of the Achaeans have already given her to Achilles; and you, Achilles, strive not further with the king, for no man who by the grace of Jove wields a sceptre has like honour with Agamemnon.
    Book 1 (45% in)
  • Therefore, Patroclus, bring her and give her to them, but let them be witnesses by the blessed gods, by mortal men, and by the fierceness of Agamemnon's anger, that if ever again there be need of me to save the people from ruin, they shall seek and they shall not find.
    Book 1 (55% in)
  • Help your brave son, therefore, if you are able.
    Book 1 (64% in)
  • It was you, goddess, who delivered him by calling to Olympus the hundred-handed monster whom gods call Briareus, but men Aegaeon, for he is stronger even than his father; when therefore he took his seat all-glorious beside the son of Saturn, the other gods were afraid, and did not bind him.
    Book 1 (66% in)
  • Would indeed that you had lived your span free from all sorrow at your ships, for it is all too brief; alas, that you should be at once short of life and long of sorrow above your peers: woe, therefore, was the hour in which I bore you; nevertheless I will go to the snowy heights of Olympus, and tell this tale to Jove, if he will hear our prayer: meanwhile stay where you are with your ships, nurse your anger against the Achaeans, and hold aloof from fight.
    Book 1 (68% in)
  • I believe, therefore, that you have been promising her to give glory to Achilles, and to kill much people at the ships of the Achaeans.
    Book 1 (91% in)
  • Let us now, therefore, arm the sons of the Achaeans.
    Book 2 (8% in)
  • But he who has seen it is the foremost man among us; we must therefore set about getting the people under arms.
    Book 2 (9% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say: let us sail back to our own land, for we shall not take Troy.
    Book 2 (16% in)
  • I tell you, therefore—and it shall surely be—that if I again catch you talking such nonsense, I will either forfeit my own head and be no more called father of Telemachus, or I will take you, strip you stark naked, and whip you out of the assembly till you go blubbering back to the ships.
    Book 2 (29% in)
  • He therefore with all sincerity and goodwill addressed them thus:— "King Agamemnon, the Achaeans are for making you a by-word among all mankind.
    Book 2 (32% in)
  • A man chafes at having to stay away from his wife even for a single month, when he is on shipboard, at the mercy of wind and sea, but it is now nine long years that we have been kept here; I cannot, therefore, blame the Achaeans if they turn restive; still we shall be shamed if we go home empty after so long a stay—therefore, my friends, be patient yet a little longer that we may learn whether the prophesyings of Calchas were false or true.
    Book 2 (33% in)
  • A man chafes at having to stay away from his wife even for a single month, when he is on shipboard, at the mercy of wind and sea, but it is now nine long years that we have been kept here; I cannot, therefore, blame the Achaeans if they turn restive; still we shall be shamed if we go home empty after so long a stay—therefore, my friends, be patient yet a little longer that we may learn whether the prophesyings of Calchas were false or true.
    Book 2 (33% in)
  • Stay here, therefore, all of you, till we take the city of Priam.
    Book 2 (37% in)
  • Stand, therefore, son of Atreus, by your own steadfast purpose; lead the Argives on to battle, and leave this handful of men to rot, who scheme, and scheme in vain, to get back to Argos ere they have learned whether Jove be true or a liar.
    Book 2 (39% in)
  • He showed us favourable signs by flashing his lightning on our right hands; therefore let none make haste to go till he has first lain with the wife of some Trojan, and avenged the toil and sorrow that he has suffered for the sake of Helen.
    Book 2 (40% in)
  • Now, therefore, get your morning meal, that our hosts join in fight.
    Book 2 (43% in)
  • Therefore, let each chief give orders to his own people, setting them severally in array and leading them forth to battle.
    Book 2 (91% in)
  • He sprang, therefore, from his chariot, clad in his suit of armour.
    Book 3 (7% in)
  • I received them in my own house, and therefore know both of them by sight and conversation.
    Book 3 (45% in)
  • The victory has been with Menelaus; therefore give back Helen with all her wealth, and pay such fine as shall be agreed upon, in testimony among them that shall be born hereafter.
    Book 3 (99% in)
  • "Argives," said he, "slacken not one whit in your onset; father Jove will be no helper of liars; the Trojans have been the first to break their oaths and to attack us; therefore they shall be devoured of vultures; we shall take their city and carry off their wives and children in our ships."
    Book 4 (43% in)
  • Go, therefore, into battle, and show yourself the man you have been always proud to be.
    Book 4 (47% in)
  • Tydeus, therefore, and Polynices went their way.
    Book 4 (68% in)
  • Therefore let us acquit ourselves with valour.
    Book 4 (74% in)
  • Therefore he was named Simoeisius, but he did not live to pay his parents for his rearing, for he was cut off untimely by the spear of mighty Ajax, who struck him in the breast by the right nipple as he was coming on among the foremost fighters; the spear went right through his shoulder, and he fell as a poplar that has grown straight and tall in a meadow by some mere, and its top is thick with branches.
    Book 4 (86% in)
  • Minerva, therefore, took Mars by the hand and said, "Mars, Mars, bane of men, bloodstained stormer of cities, may we not now leave the Trojans and Achaeans to fight it out, and see to which of the two Jove will vouchsafe the victory?
    Book 5 (4% in)
  • Therefore drive them yourself and I will be ready for him with my spear.
    Book 5 (28% in)
  • ...them in their fall, and made his way to the front, clad in gleaming bronze and brandishing his spear, for Mars egged him on to do so with intent that he should be killed by Aeneas; but Antilochus the son of Nestor saw him and sprang forward, fearing that the king might come to harm and thus bring all their labour to nothing; when, therefore Aeneas and Menelaus were setting their hands and spears against one another eager to do battle, Antilochus placed himself by the side of Menelaus.
    Book 5 (63% in)
  • Keep your faces therefore towards the Trojans, but give ground backwards, for we dare not fight with gods.
    Book 5 (68% in)
  • He doubted whether to pursue the son of Jove, or to make slaughter of the Lycian rank and file; it was not decreed, however, that he should slay the son of Jove; Minerva, therefore, turned him against the main body of the Lycians.
    Book 5 (75% in)
  • Therefore I am retreating, and bidding the other Argives gather in this place, for I know that Mars is now lording it in the field.
    Book 5 (91% in)
  • Bloody Mars was stripping him of his armour, and Minerva donned the helmet of Hades, that he might not see her; when, therefore, he saw Diomed, he made straight for him and let Periphas lie where he had fallen.
    Book 5 (93% in)
  • Menelaus, therefore, thrust Adrestus from him, whereon King Agamemnon struck him in the flank, and he fell: then the son of Atreus planted his foot upon his breast to draw his spear from the body.
    Book 6 (12% in)
  • Therefore I will not fight with the blessed gods; but if you are of them that eat the fruit of the ground, draw near and meet your doom.
    Book 6 (27% in)
  • He bade Bellerophon show these letters to his father-in-law, to the end that he might thus perish; Bellerophon therefore went to Lycia, and the gods convoyed him safely.
    Book 6 (33% in)
  • And Alexandrus answered, "Hector, your rebuke is just; listen therefore, and believe me when I tell you that I am not here so much through rancour or ill-will towards the Trojans, as from a desire to indulge my grief.
    Book 6 (64% in)
  • When, therefore, Minerva saw these men making havoc of the Argives, she darted down to Ilius from the summits of Olympus, and Apollo, who was looking on from Pergamus, went out to meet her; for he wanted the Trojans to be victorious.
    Book 7 (5% in)
  • Minerva assented, and Helenus son of Priam divined the counsel of the gods; he therefore went up to Hector and said, "Hector son of Priam, peer of gods in counsel, I am your brother, let me then persuade you.
    Book 7 (10% in)
  • He now abides at the ships in anger with Agamemnon shepherd of his people, but there are many of us who are well able to face you; therefore begin the fight.
    Book 7 (48% in)
  • They led him, therefore, to the city as one that had been saved beyond their hopes.
    Book 7 (64% in)
  • As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, old Nestor whose counsel was ever truest began to speak; with all sincerity and goodwill, therefore, he addressed them thus:— "Son of Atreus, and other chieftains, inasmuch as many of the Achaeans are now dead, whose blood Mars has shed by the banks of the Scamander, and their souls have gone down to the house of Hades, it will be well when morning comes that we should cease fighting; we will then wheel our dead together with oxen and...
    Book 7 (68% in)
  • Thus did he pray, and father Jove pitying his tears vouchsafed him that his people should live, not die; forthwith he sent them an eagle, most unfailingly portentous of all birds, with a young fawn in its talons; the eagle dropped the fawn by the altar on which the Achaeans sacrificed to Jove the lord of omens; when, therefore, the people saw that the bird had come from Jove, they sprang more fiercely upon the Trojans and fought more boldly.
    Book 8 (46% in)
  • I tell you therefore-and it would have surely been—I should have struck you with lighting, and your chariots would never have brought you back again to Olympus.
    Book 8 (81% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us obey the behests of night, and prepare our suppers.
    Book 8 (89% in)
  • This night, therefore, let us keep watch, but with early morning let us put on our armour and rouse fierce war at the ships of the Achaeans; I shall then know whether brave Diomed the son of Tydeus will drive me back from the ships to the wall, or whether I shall myself slay him and carry off his bloodstained spoils.
    Book 8 (94% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say and sail back to our own country, for we shall not take Troy.
    Book 9 (4% in)
  • You are still young—you might be the youngest of my own children—still you have spoken wisely and have counselled the chief of the Achaeans not without discretion; nevertheless I am older than you and I will tell you everything; therefore let no man, not even King Agamemnon, disregard my saying, for he that foments civil discord is a clanless, hearthless outlaw.
    Book 9 (9% in)
  • He, therefore, with all sincerity and goodwill addressed them thus.
    Book 9 (14% in)
  • Jove, moreover, has vouchsafed you to wield the sceptre and to uphold righteousness, that you may take thought for your people under you; therefore it behooves you above all others both to speak and to give ear, and to out the counsel of another who shall have been minded to speak wisely.
    Book 9 (15% in)
  • All turns on you and on your commands, therefore I will say what I think will be best.
    Book 9 (15% in)
  • I was blinded with passion and yielded to my worser mind; therefore I will make amends, and will give him great gifts by way of atonement.
    Book 9 (18% in)
  • Therefore, let him now obey me.
    Book 9 (23% in)
  • Him do I hate even as the gates of hell who says one thing while he hides another in his heart; therefore I will say what I mean.
    Book 9 (45% in)
  • Go, therefore, as in duty bound, and tell the princes of the Achaeans the message that I have sent them; tell them to find some other plan for the saving of their ships and people, for so long as my displeasure lasts the one that they have now hit upon may not be.
    Book 9 (60% in)
  • Therefore, my son, I will not stay here without you—no, not though heaven itself vouchsafe to strip my years from off me, and make me young as I was when I first left Hellas the land of fair women.
    Book 9 (63% in)
  • My mother, therefore, prayed me without ceasing to lie with the woman myself, that so she hate my father, and in the course of time I yielded.
    Book 9 (64% in)
  • Now, therefore, I say battle with your pride and beat it; cherish not your anger for ever; the might and majesty of heaven are more than ours, but even heaven may be appeased; and if a man has sinned he prays the gods, and reconciles them to himself by his piteous cries and by frankincense, with drink-offerings and the savour of burnt sacrifice.
    Book 9 (70% in)
  • Therefore, Achilles, give these daughters of Jove due reverence, and bow before them as all good men will bow.
    Book 9 (72% in)
  • He was incensed with his mother Althaea, and therefore stayed at home with his wedded wife fair Cleopatra, who was daughter of Marpessa daughter of Euenus, and of Ides the man then living.
    Book 9 (78% in)
  • But Patroclus told his men and the maid-servants to make ready a comfortable bed for Phoenix; they therefore did so with sheepskins, a rug, and a sheet of fine linen.
    Book 9 (93% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say; we have eaten and drunk our fill, let us then take our rest, for in rest there is both strength and stay.
    Book 9 (99% in)
  • He therefore rose, put on his shirt, bound his sandals about his comely feet, flung the skin of a huge tawny lion over his shoulders—a skin that reached his feet—and took his spear in his hand.
    Book 10 (4% in)
  • Run, therefore, with all speed by the line of the ships, and call Ajax and Idomeneus.
    Book 10 (9% in)
  • They sat down, therefore, and held debate with one another.
    Book 10 (35% in)
  • But when he had fled so far towards the ships that he would soon have fallen in with the outposts, Minerva infused fresh strength into the son of Tydeus for fear some other of the Achaeans might have the glory of being first to hit him, and he might himself be only second; he therefore sprang forward with his spear and said, "Stand, or I shall throw my spear, and in that case I shall soon make an end of you."
    Book 10 (63% in)
  • The Trojans have their watchfires, for they are bound to have them; they, therefore, are awake and keep each other to their duty as sentinels; but the allies who have come from other places are asleep and leave it to the Trojans to keep guard, for their wives and children are not here.
    Book 10 (72% in)
  • Now, therefore, take me to the ships or bind me securely here, until you come back and have proved my words whether they be false or true.
    Book 10 (76% in)
  • Ulysses hung them up aloft in honour of Minerva the goddess of plunder, and prayed saying, "Accept these, goddess, for we give them to you in preference to all the gods in Olympus: therefore speed us still further towards the horses and sleeping-ground of the Thracians."
    Book 10 (80% in)
  • It had been noised abroad as far as Cyprus that the Achaeans were about to sail for Troy, and therefore he gave it to the king.
    Book 11 (4% in)
  • When the Trojans saw that Ulysses was bleeding they raised a great shout and came on in a body towards him; he therefore gave ground, and called his comrades to come and help him.
    Book 11 (55% in)
  • Thrice did he cry as loudly as man can cry, and thrice did brave Menelaus hear him; he turned, therefore, to Ajax who was close beside him and said, "Ajax, noble son of Telamon, captain of your people, the cry of Ulysses rings in my ears, as though the Trojans had cut him off and were worsting him while he is single-handed.
    Book 11 (55% in)
  • ...upon him, and stripped the armour from his shoulders; but when Alexandrus saw him, he aimed an arrow at him which struck him in the right thigh; the arrow broke, but the point that was left in the wound dragged on the thigh; he drew back, therefore, under cover of his comrades to save his life, shouting as he did so to the Danaans, "My friends, princes and counsellors of the Argives, rally to the defence of Ajax who is being overpowered, and I doubt whether he will come out of the...
    Book 11 (69% in)
  • It had been built without the consent of the immortals, and therefore it did not last.
    Book 12 (2% in)
  • They could neither jump it nor cross it, for it had overhanging banks all round upon either side, above which there were the sharp stakes that the sons of the Achaeans had planted so close and strong as a defence against all who would assail it; a horse, therefore, could not get into it and draw his chariot after him, but those who were on foot kept trying their very utmost.
    Book 12 (12% in)
  • Our horses therefore cannot get down into it, and would be of no use if they did; moreover it is a narrow place and we should come to harm.
    Book 12 (14% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say; let our squires hold our horses by the trench, but let us follow Hector in a body on foot, clad in full armour, and if the day of their doom is at hand the Achaeans will not be able to withstand us.
    Book 12 (16% in)
  • Moreover we hold a large estate by the banks of the river Xanthus, fair with orchard lawns and wheat-growing land; it becomes us, therefore, to take our stand at the head of all the Lycians and bear the brunt of the fight, that one may say to another, 'Our princes in Lycia eat the fat of the land and drink best of wine, but they are fine fellows; they fight well and are ever at the front in battle.'
    Book 12 (67% in)
  • My good friend, if, when we were once out of this fight, we could escape old age and death thenceforward and forever, I should neither press forward myself nor bid you do so, but death in ten thousand shapes hangs ever over our heads, and no man can elude him; therefore let us go forward and either win glory for ourselves, or yield it to another.
    Book 12 (69% in)
  • Menestheus, therefore, sent Thootes with a message to Ajax.
    Book 12 (72% in)
  • He therefore retired a little space from the battlement, yet without losing all his ground, for he still thought to cover himself with glory.
    Book 12 (85% in)
  • He turned therefore towards the ships and tents to fetch a spear which he had left behind in his tent.
    Book 13 (21% in)
  • Neptune was exceedingly angry that his grandson Amphimachus should have fallen; he therefore went to the tents and ships of the Achaeans to urge the Danaans still further, and to devise evil for the Trojans.
    Book 13 (26% in)
  • I have taken them from Trojans whom I have killed, for I am not one to keep my enemy at arm's length; therefore I have spears, bossed shields, helmets, and burnished corslets."
    Book 13 (32% in)
  • He would not yield even to Achilles in hand-to-hand fight, and in fleetness of foot there is none to beat him; let us turn therefore towards the left wing, that we may know forthwith whether we are to give glory to some other, or he to us.
    Book 13 (38% in)
  • Both were of the same race and country, but Jove was elder born and knew more, therefore Neptune feared to defend the Argives openly, but in the likeness of man, he kept on encouraging them throughout their host.
    Book 13 (42% in)
  • Idomeneus drew his spear out of the body, but could not strip him of the rest of his armour for the rain of darts that were showered upon him: moreover his strength was now beginning to fail him so that he could no longer charge, and could neither spring forward to recover his own weapon nor swerve aside to avoid one that was aimed at him; therefore, though he still defended himself in hand-to-hand fight, his heavy feet could not bear him swiftly out of the battle.
    Book 13 (61% in)
  • One half, therefore, of the spear stuck fast like a charred stake in Antilochus's shield, while the other lay on the ground.
    Book 13 (68% in)
  • Paris was deeply grieved by the death of Harpalion, who was his host when he went among the Paphlagonians; he aimed an arrow, therefore, in order to avenge him.
    Book 13 (79% in)
  • This Euchenor had set sail for Troy well knowing that it would be the death of him, for his good old father Polyidus had often told him that he must either stay at home and die of a terrible disease, or go with the Achaeans and perish at the hands of the Trojans; he chose, therefore, to avoid incurring the heavy fine the Achaeans would have laid upon him, and at the same time to escape the pain and suffering of disease.
    Book 13 (80% in)
  • He therefore held on at the point where he had first forced his way through the gates and the wall, after breaking through the serried ranks of Danaan warriors.
    Book 13 (81% in)
  • The others, therefore, with their heavy armour bore the brunt of the fight with the Trojans and with Hector, while the Locrians shot from behind, under their cover; and thus the Trojans began to lose heart, for the arrows threw them into confusion.
    Book 13 (86% in)
  • Because heaven has so richly endowed you with the arts of war, you think that you must therefore excel others in counsel; but you cannot thus claim preeminence in all things.
    Book 13 (87% in)
  • Heaven has made one man an excellent soldier; of another it has made a dancer or a singer and player on the lyre; while yet in another Jove has implanted a wise understanding of which men reap fruit to the saving of many, and he himself knows more about it than any one; therefore I will say what I think will be best.
    Book 13 (88% in)
  • Draw back, therefore, and call your chieftains round you, that we may advise together whether to fall now upon the ships in the hope that heaven may vouchsafe us victory, or to beat a retreat while we can yet safely do so.
    Book 13 (89% in)
  • Now, therefore, lead on where you would have us go, and we will follow with right goodwill; you shall not find us fail you in so far as our strength holds out, but no man can do more than in him lies, no matter how willing he may be.
    Book 13 (93% in)
  • The shouts of men fighting by our ships grow stronger and stronger; stay here, therefore, and sit over your wine, while fair Hecamede heats you a bath and washes the clotted blood from off you.
    Book 14 (1% in)
  • The stretch of the shore, wide though it was, did not afford room for all the ships, and the host was cramped for space, therefore they had placed the ships in rows one behind the other, and had filled the whole opening of the bay between the two points that formed it.
    Book 14 (7% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say; let us bring down the ships that are on the beach and draw them into the water; let us make them fast to their mooring-stones a little way out, against the fall of night—if even by night the Trojans will desist from fighting; we may then draw down the rest of the fleet.
    Book 14 (14% in)
  • It would be ruin; the Achaeans will not go on fighting when they see the ships being drawn into the water, but will cease attacking and keep turning their eyes towards them; your counsel, therefore, sir captain, would be our destruction.
    Book 14 (20% in)
  • You must yourselves have heard whether these things are true or no; therefore when I say well despise not my words as though I were a coward or of ignoble birth.
    Book 14 (24% in)
  • She went, therefore, to the room which her son Vulcan had made her, and the doors of which he had cunningly fastened by means of a secret key so that no other god could open them.
    Book 14 (31% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say.
    Book 14 (70% in)
  • See how Promachus now sleeps, vanquished by my spear; payment for my brother's blood has not been long delayed; a man, therefore, may well be thankful if he leaves a kinsman in his house behind him to avenge his fall."
    Book 14 (92% in)
  • Make the best, therefore, of whatever ills he may choose to send each one of you; Mars, I take it, has had a taste of them already, for his son Ascalaphus has fallen in battle—the man whom of all others he loved most dearly and whose father he owns himself to be.
    Book 15 (14% in)
  • Therefore lay aside your anger for the death of your son; better men than he have either been killed already or will fall hereafter, and one cannot protect every one's whole family."
    Book 15 (18% in)
  • Therefore I will not walk as Jove would have me.
    Book 15 (25% in)
  • Now, therefore, order your horsemen to drive their chariots to the ships in great multitudes.
    Book 15 (33% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us all do as I say; let us order the main body of our forces to fall back upon the ships, but let those of us who profess to be the flower of the army stand firm, and see whether we cannot hold Hector back at the point of our spears as soon as he comes near us; I conceive that he will then think better of it before he tries to charge into the press of the Danaans.
    Book 15 (38% in)
  • Therefore swarm round the ships and fight.
    Book 15 (65% in)
  • For he meant giving glory to Hector son of Priam, and letting him throw fire upon the ships, till he had fulfilled the unrighteous prayer that Thetis had made him; Jove, therefore, bided his time till he should see the glare of a blazing ship.
    Book 15 (80% in)
  • Therefore he left the raised deck at the stern, and stepped back on to the seven-foot bench of the oarsmen.
    Book 15 (97% in)
  • Our salvation, therefore, is in the might of our hands and in hard fighting.
    Book 15 (99% in)
  • Ajax, therefore, had now nothing but a headless spear, while the bronze point flew some way off and came ringing down on to the ground.
    Book 16 (14% in)
  • Therefore he drew back, and the Trojans flung fire upon the ship which was at once wrapped in flame.
    Book 16 (14% in)
  • Automedon therefore yoked the fleet horses Xanthus and Balius, steeds that could fly like the wind: these were they whom the harpy Podarge bore to the west wind, as she was grazing in a meadow by the waters of the river Oceanus.
    Book 16 (17% in)
  • Polymele, daughter of Phylas the graceful dancer, bore him; the mighty slayer of Argos was enamoured of her as he saw her among the singing women at a dance held in honour of Diana the rushing huntress of the golden arrows; he therefore—Mercury, giver of all good—went with her into an upper chamber, and lay with her in secret, whereon she bore him a noble son Eudorus, singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant.
    Book 16 (21% in)
  • The hour is now come for those high feats of arms that you have so long been pining for, therefore keep high hearts each one of you to do battle with the Trojans.
    Book 16 (24% in)
  • The ships rang again with the cry which the Achaeans raised, and when the Trojans saw the brave son of Menoetius and his squire all gleaming in their armour, they were daunted and their battalions were thrown into confusion, for they thought the fleet son of Peleus must now have put aside his anger, and have been reconciled to Agamemnon; every one, therefore, looked round about to see whither he might fly for safety.
    Book 16 (33% in)
  • Therefore he prayed to far-darting Apollo saying, "Hear me O king from your seat, may be in the rich land of Lycia, or may be in Troy, for in all places you can hear the prayer of one who is in distress, as I now am.
    Book 16 (60% in)
  • Jove defended not his son, do you, therefore, O king, heal me of my wound, ease my pain and grant me strength both to cheer on the Lycians and to fight along with them round the body of him who has fallen.
    Book 16 (61% in)
  • Glaucus perceived this, and was thankful that the mighty god had answered his prayer; forthwith, therefore, he went among the Lycian captains, and bade them come to fight about the body of Sarpedon.
    Book 16 (62% in)
  • He spoke to men who of themselves were full eager; both sides, therefore, the Trojans and Lycians on the one hand, and the Myrmidons and Achaeans on the other, strengthened their battalions, and fought desperately about the body of Sarpedon, shouting fiercely the while.
    Book 16 (65% in)
  • The spear, therefore, sped from Aeneas's hand in vain and fell quivering to the ground.
    Book 16 (71% in)
  • On this the son of Menoetius rebuked him and said, "Meriones, hero though you be, you should not speak thus; taunting speeches, my good friend, will not make the Trojans draw away from the dead body; some of them must go under ground first; blows for battle, and words for council; fight, therefore, and say nothing."
    Book 16 (73% in)
  • First, therefore, he made Hector turn fainthearted, whereon he mounted his chariot and fled, bidding the other Trojans fly also, for he saw that the scales of Jove had turned against him.
    Book 16 (75% in)
  • The Achaeans, therefore stripped the gleaming armour from his shoulders and the brave son of Menoetius gave it to his men to take to the ships.
    Book 16 (76% in)
  • I was first of the Trojans and their brave allies to drive my spear into Patroclus, let me, therefore, have my full glory among the Trojans, or I will take aim and kill you.
    Book 17 (2% in)
  • While he was thus in two minds, the Trojans came up to him with Hector at their head; he therefore drew back and left the body, turning about like some bearded lion who is being chased by dogs and men from a stockyard with spears and hue and cry, whereon he is daunted and slinks sulkily off—even so did Menelaus son of Atreus turn and leave the body of Patroclus.
    Book 17 (13% in)
  • But Ajax came up with his shield like wall before him, on which Hector withdrew under shelter of his men, and sprang on to his chariot, giving the armour over to the Trojans to take to the city, as a great trophy for himself; Ajax, therefore, covered the body of Patroclus with his broad shield and bestrode him; as a lion stands over his whelps if hunters have come upon him in a forest when he is with his little ones—in the pride and fierceness of his strength he draws his knit brows...
    Book 17 (16% in)
  • Therefore turn, and charge at the foe, to stand or fall as is the game of war; whoever shall bring Patroclus, dead though he be, into the hands of the Trojans, and shall make Ajax give way before him, I will give him one half of the spoils while I keep the other.
    Book 17 (29% in)
  • "My friends," he cried, "princes and counsellors of the Argives, all you who with Agamemnon and Menelaus drink at the public cost, and give orders each to his own people as Jove vouchsafes him power and glory, the fight is so thick about me that I cannot distinguish you severally; come on, therefore, every man unbidden, and think it shame that Patroclus should become meat and morsel for Trojan hounds."
    Book 17 (32% in)
  • Jove, moreover, hid the brightness of their helmets in a thick cloud, for he had borne no grudge against the son of Menoetius while he was still alive and squire to the descendant of Aeacus; therefore he was loth to let him fall a prey to the dogs of his foes the Trojans, and urged his comrades on to defend him.
    Book 17 (35% in)
  • Therefore let us make for the Danaans, that it may go hard with them ere they bear away dead Patroclus to the ships.
    Book 17 (45% in)
  • Aeneas speared Leiocritus son of Arisbas, a valiant follower of Lycomedes, and Lycomedes was moved with pity as he saw him fall; he therefore went close up, and speared Apisaon son of Hippasus shepherd of his people in the liver under the midriff, so that he died; he had come from fertile Paeonia and was the best man of them all after Asteropaeus.
    Book 17 (45% in)
  • He had no idea, therefore, that Patroclus was dead, and deemed that he would return alive as soon as he had gone close up to the gates.
    Book 17 (53% in)
  • Nevertheless the issue lies on the lap of heaven, I will therefore hurl my spear and leave the rest to Jove.
    Book 17 (68% in)
  • Therefore be staunch, and urge your men to be so also.
    Book 17 (73% in)
  • Therefore she put strength into his knees and shoulders, and made him as bold as a fly, which, though driven off will yet come again and bite if it can, so dearly does it love man's blood—even so bold as this did she make him as he stood over Patroclus and threw his spear.
    Book 17 (75% in)
  • Idomeneus had left the ships on foot and would have afforded a great triumph to the Trojans if Coiranus had not driven quickly up to him, he therefore brought life and rescue to Idomeneus, but himself fell by the hand of murderous Hector.
    Book 17 (81% in)
  • ...I have brought no saving neither to Patroclus nor to my other comrades of whom so many have been slain by mighty Hector; I stay here by my ships a bootless burden upon the earth, I, who in fight have no peer among the Achaeans, though in council there are better than I. Therefore, perish strife both from among gods and men, and anger, wherein even a righteous man will harden his heart—which rises up in the soul of a man like smoke, and the taste thereof is sweeter than drops of honey.
    Book 18 (18% in)
  • Hold me not back, therefore, in the love you bear me, for you shall not move me.
    Book 18 (21% in)
  • He was comrade to Hector, and they had been born upon the same night; with all sincerity and goodwill, therefore, he addressed them thus:— "Look to it well, my friends; I would urge you to go back now to your city and not wait here by the ships till morning, for we are far from our walls.
    Book 18 (41% in)
  • Now, therefore, that the son of scheming Saturn has vouchsafed me to win glory here and to hem the Achaeans in at their ships, prate no more in this fool's wise among the people.
    Book 18 (47% in)
  • If, then, Thetis has come to my house I must make her due requital for having saved me; entertain her, therefore, with all hospitality, while I put by my bellows and all my tools.
    Book 18 (65% in)
  • Then the Trojans hemmed the Achaeans in at their ships' sterns and would not let them come forth; the elders, therefore, of the Argives besought Achilles and offered him great treasure, whereon he refused to bring deliverance to them himself, but put his own armour on Patroclus and sent him into the fight with much people after him.
    Book 18 (72% in)
  • Therefore I am suppliant at your knees if haply you may be pleased to provide my son, whose end is near at hand, with helmet and shield, with goodly greaves fitted with ancle-clasps, and with a breastplate, for he lost his own when his true comrade fell at the hands of the Trojans, and he now lies stretched on earth in the bitterness of his soul.
    Book 18 (73% in)
  • Many also of his followers were weeping round him, but when the goddess came among them she clasped his hand in her own, saying, "My son, grieve as we may we must let this man lie, for it is by heaven's will that he has fallen; now, therefore, accept from Vulcan this rich and goodly armour, which no man has ever yet borne upon his shoulders."
    Book 19 (3% in)
  • Call, therefore, the Achaean heroes in assembly; unsay your anger against Agamemnon; arm at once, and fight with might and main.
    Book 19 (8% in)
  • I put it from me: I dare not nurse it for ever; therefore, bid the Achaeans arm forthwith that I may go out against the Trojans, and learn whether they will be in a mind to sleep by the ships or no. Glad, I ween, will he be to rest his knees who may fly my spear when I wield it.
    Book 19 (16% in)
  • There is a fine child born this day, Eurystheus, son to Sthenelus the son of Perseus; he is of your lineage; it is well, therefore, that he should reign over the Argives.'
    Book 19 (29% in)
  • Go, therefore, into battle, you and your people with you.
    Book 19 (33% in)
  • But a man can fight all day if he is full fed with meat and wine; his heart beats high, and his strength will stay till he has routed all his foes; therefore, send the people away and bid them prepare their meal; King Agamemnon will bring out the gifts in presence of the assembly, that all may see them and you may be satisfied.
    Book 19 (40% in)
  • Therefore I can take thought of nothing save only slaughter and blood and the rattle in the throat of the dying.
    Book 19 (49% in)
  • Therefore be patient under my words.
    Book 19 (51% in)
  • Then he said— "Hapless and dearest comrade, you it was who would get a good dinner ready for me at once and without delay when the Achaeans were hasting to fight the Trojans; now, therefore, though I have meat and drink in my tents, yet will I fast for sorrow.
    Book 19 (74% in)
  • In such wise, therefore, did they gather in the house of Jove.
    Book 20 (3% in)
  • In his likeness therefore, he said to Aeneas, "Aeneas, counsellor of the Trojans, where are now the brave words with which you vaunted over your wine before the Trojan princes, saying that you would fight Achilles son of Peleus in single combat?"
    Book 20 (18% in)
  • Bring, therefore, your spear to bear upon him, and let him not scare you with his taunts and menaces.
    Book 20 (23% in)
  • You think they will protect you now, but they will not do so; therefore I say go back into the host, and do not face me, or you will rue it.
    Book 20 (39% in)
  • No words of yours shall turn me now that I am fain to fight—therefore let us make trial of one another with our spears.
    Book 20 (50% in)
  • When Hector saw his brother Polydorus with his entrails in his hands and sinking down upon the ground, a mist came over his eyes, and he could not bear to keep longer at a distance; he therefore poised his spear and darted towards Achilles like a flame of fire.
    Book 20 (83% in)
  • Therefore when Tros laid hold of his knees and sought a hearing for his prayers, Achilles drove his sword into his liver, and the liver came rolling out, while his bosom was all covered with the black blood that welled from the wound.
    Book 20 (92% in)
  • Therefore, my friend, you too shall die.
    Book 21 (17% in)
  • Therefore as Jove is mightier than any river that flows into the sea, so are his children stronger than those of any river whatsoever.
    Book 21 (31% in)
  • I am in despair, therefore, O captain of your host, trouble me no further.
    Book 21 (36% in)
  • Meanwhile King Neptune turned to Apollo saying, "Phoebus, why should we keep each other at arm's length? it is not well, now that the others have begun fighting; it will be disgraceful to us if we return to Jove's bronze-floored mansion on Olympus without having fought each other; therefore come on, you are the younger of the two, and I ought not to attack you, for I am older and have had more experience.
    Book 21 (72% in)
  • Therefore boast as you will among the immortals that you worsted me in fair fight.
    Book 21 (81% in)
  • Here therefore, huge and mighty warrior though you be, here shall you die.
    Book 21 (96% in)
  • Then Minerva said, "Dear brother, my father and mother went down on their knees and implored me, as did all my comrades, to remain inside, so great a fear has fallen upon them all; but I was in an agony of grief when I beheld you; now, therefore, let us two make a stand and fight, and let there be no keeping our spears in reserve, that we may learn whether Achilles shall kill us and bear off our spoils to the ships, or whether he shall fall before you."
    Book 22 (46% in)
  • Therefore there can be no understanding between you and me, nor may there be any covenants between us, till one or other shall fall and glut grim Mars with his life's blood.
    Book 22 (50% in)
  • Now, therefore, Achaean youths, let us raise the song of victory and go back to the ships taking this man along with us; for we have achieved a mighty triumph and have slain noble Hector to whom the Trojans prayed throughout their city as though he were a god.
    Book 22 (74% in)
  • Now, therefore, let us do all that this sad festival demands, but at break of day, King Agamemnon, bid your men bring wood, and provide all else that the dead may duly take into the realm of darkness; the fire shall thus burn him out of our sight the sooner, and the people shall turn again to their own labours.
    Book 23 (5% in)
  • The knight Peleus took me into his house, entreated me kindly, and named me to be your squire; therefore let our bones lie in but a single urn, the two-handled golden vase given to you by your mother.
    Book 23 (10% in)
  • When they had thrown down their great logs of wood over the whole ground, they stayed all of them where they were, but Achilles ordered his brave Myrmidons to gird on their armour, and to yoke each man his horses; they therefore rose, girded on their armour and mounted each his chariot—they and their charioteers with them.
    Book 23 (15% in)
  • Thus did my father vow, but you have not fulfilled his prayer; now, therefore, that I shall see my home no more, I give this lock as a keepsake to the hero Patroclus.
    Book 23 (17% in)
  • Achilles therefore bethought him of another matter; he went apart and prayed to the two winds Boreas and Zephyrus vowing them goodly offerings.
    Book 23 (22% in)
  • I need not therefore say much by way of instruction.
    Book 23 (35% in)
  • The other drivers know less than you do, but their horses are fleeter; therefore, my dear son, see if you cannot hit upon some artifice whereby you may insure that the prize shall not slip through your fingers.
    Book 23 (36% in)
  • Therefore, my dear son, mind well what you are about, for if you can be first to round the post there is no chance of any one giving you the go-by later, not even though you had Adrestus's horse Arion behind you—a horse which is of divine race—or those of Laomedon, which are the noblest in this country."
    Book 23 (39% in)
  • You have made me cut a poor figure and baulked my horses by flinging your own in front of them, though yours are much worse than mine are; therefore, O princes and counsellors of the Argives, judge between us and show no favour, lest one of the Achaeans say, 'Menelaus has got the mare through lying and corruption; his horses were far inferior to Antilochus's, but he has greater weight and influence.'
    Book 23 (64% in)
  • ...younger, King Menelaus, than you are; you stand higher than I do and are the better man of the two; you know how easily young men are betrayed into indiscretion; their tempers are more hasty and they have less judgement; make due allowances therefore, and bear with me; I will of my own accord give up the mare that I have won, and if you claim any further chattel from my own possessions, I would rather yield it to you, at once, than fall from your good graces henceforth, and do wrong...
    Book 23 (66% in)
  • ...will; you have never been headstrong nor ill-disposed hitherto, but this time your youth has got the better of your judgement; be careful how you outwit your betters in future; no one else could have brought me round so easily, but your good father, your brother, and yourself have all of you had infinite trouble on my behalf; I therefore yield to your entreaty, and will give up the mare to you, mine though it indeed be; the people will thus see that I am neither harsh nor vindictive.
    Book 23 (68% in)
  • I tell you plainly, and it shall come true; if any man will box with me I will bruise his body and break his bones; therefore let his friends stay here in a body and be at hand to take him away when I have done with him.
    Book 23 (75% in)
  • Ulysses therefore carried off the mixing-bowl, for he got before Ajax and came in first.
    Book 23 (87% in)
  • Meriones, therefore, took all ten double-edged axes, while Teucer bore off the single-edged ones to his ships.
    Book 23 (98% in)
  • But Apollo would not suffer it to be disfigured, for he pitied the man, dead though he now was; therefore he shielded him with his golden aegis continually, that he might take no hurt while Achilles was dragging him.
    Book 24 (3% in)
  • When, therefore, the morning of the twelfth day had now come, Phoebus Apollo spoke among the immortals saying, "You gods ought to be ashamed of yourselves; you are cruel and hard-hearted.
    Book 24 (4% in)
  • I shall therefore permit the body of mighty Hector to be stolen; and yet this may hardly be without Achilles coming to know it, for his mother keeps night and day beside him.
    Book 24 (9% in)
  • Let some one of you, therefore, send Thetis to me, and I will impart my counsel to her, namely that Achilles is to accept a ransom from Priam, and give up the body.
    Book 24 (10% in)
  • Now, therefore, heed what I say, for I come as a messenger from Jove; he says that the gods are angry with you, and himself more angry than them all, in that you keep Hector at the ships and will not give him up.
    Book 24 (17% in)
  • Therefore let him go, and accept a ransom for his body.
    Book 24 (18% in)
  • Then Priam said, "I would go, do not therefore stay me nor be as a bird of ill omen in my house, for you will not move me.
    Book 24 (27% in)
  • Had it been some mortal man who had sent me some prophet or priest who divines from sacrifice—I should have deemed him false and have given him no heed; but now I have heard the goddess and seen her face to face, therefore I will go and her saying shall not be in vain.
    Book 24 (28% in)
  • Now when Priam and Idaeus had driven past the great tomb of Ilius, they stayed their mules and horses that they might drink in the river, for the shades of night were falling, when, therefore, Idaeus saw Mercury standing near them he said to Priam, "Take heed, descendant of Dardanus; here is matter which demands consideration.
    Book 24 (44% in)
  • Accept therefore at my hands this goodly chalice; guard me and with heaven's help guide me till I come to the tent of the son of Peleus."
    Book 24 (53% in)
  • The greater part of them has fierce Mars laid low, and Hector, him who was alone left, him who was the guardian of the city and ourselves, him have you lately slain; therefore I am now come to the ships of the Achaeans to ransom his body from you with a great ransom.
    Book 24 (63% in)
  • Moreover I know well, O Priam, and you cannot hide it, that some god has brought you to the ships of the Achaeans, for else, no man however strong and in his prime would dare to come to our host; he could neither pass our guard unseen, nor draw the bolt of my gates thus easily; therefore, provoke me no further, lest I sin against the word of Jove, and suffer you not, suppliant though you are, within my tents.
    Book 24 (71% in)
  • Therefore, noble sir, let us two now take food; you can weep for your dear son hereafter as you are bearing him back to Ilius—and many a tear will he cost you.
    Book 24 (78% in)
  • Nine days, therefore, will we mourn Hector in my house; on the tenth day we will bury him and there shall be a public feast in his honour; on the eleventh we will build a mound over his ashes, and on the twelfth, if there be need, we will fight.
    Book 24 (83% in)
  • He hovered therefore over Priam's head and said, "Sir, now that Achilles has spared your life, you seem to have no fear about sleeping in the thick of your foes.
    Book 24 (85% in)
  • Therefore do the people mourn him.
    Book 24 (92% in)
  • Therefore my tears flow both for you and for my unhappy self, for there is no one else in Troy who is kind to me, but all shrink and shudder as they go by me.
    Book 24 (96% in)

There are no more uses of "therefore" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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