toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

goad
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

3 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
to a human:  to provoke or encourage someone to do something — usually something bad and often provoking in an annoying manner

to an animal:  to prod with a pointed stick to make it move
  • Do this, and we will sacrifice twelve heifers that have never yet known the goad, in your temple, if you will have pity upon the town, with the wives and little ones of the Trojans.
    Book 6 (59% in)
  • ...of the sacred building; there, upon the knees of Minerva, let her lay the largest, fairest robe she has in her house—the one she sets most store by; let her, moreover, promise to sacrifice twelve yearling heifers that have never yet felt the goad, in the temple of the goddess, if she will take pity on the town, with the wives and little ones of the Trojans, and keep the son of Tydeus from falling on the goodly city of Ilius; for he fights with fury and fills men's souls with panic.
    Book 6 (18% in)
  • ...to the temple of Minerva driver of the spoil; there, upon the knees of Minerva, lay the largest and fairest robe you have in your house—the one you set most store by; promise, moreover, to sacrifice twelve yearling heifers that have never yet felt the goad, in the temple of the goddess if she will take pity on the town, with the wives and little ones of the Trojans, and keep the son of Tydeus from off the goodly city of Ilius, for he fights with fury, and fills men's souls with panic.
    Book 6 (53% in)

There are no more uses of "goad" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article