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disdain
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

3 uses
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Definition
a lack of respect — often suggesting distaste and an undeserved sense of superiority

or:

to reject as not good enough
  • "Incline your head," said she, "and promise me surely, or else deny me—for you have nothing to fear—that I may learn how greatly you disdain me."
    Book 1 (84% in)
  • Still, taunt me not with the gifts that golden Venus has given me; they are precious; let not a man disdain them, for the gods give them where they are minded, and none can have them for the asking.
    Book 3 (15% in)
  • All were of this mind save only Juno, Neptune, and Jove's grey-eyed daughter, who persisted in the hate which they had ever borne towards Ilius with Priam and his people; for they forgave not the wrong done them by Alexandrus in disdaining the goddesses who came to him when he was in his sheepyards, and preferring her who had offered him a wanton to his ruin.
    Book 24 (4% in)

There are no more uses of "disdain" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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