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vaunted
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

23 uses
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Definition
extravagantly praised
  • Now, now thy country calls her wonted friends, And the proud vaunt in just derision ends.
    Book 5 (53% in)
  • O give my lance to reach the Trojan knight, Whose arrow wounds the chief thou guard'st in fight; And lay the boaster grovelling on the shore, That vaunts these eyes shall view the light no more."
    Book 5 (15% in)
  • Mistaken vaunter!
    Book 5 (32% in)
  • Hector may vaunt, but who shall heed the boast?
    Book 8 (28% in)
  • While every Trojan thus, and every aid, The advice of wise Polydamas obey'd, Asius alone, confiding in his car, His vaunted coursers urged to meet the war.
    Book 12 (25% in)
  • Urge those who stand, and those who faint, excite; Drown Hector's vaunts in loud exhorts of fight; Conquest, not safety, fill the thoughts of all; Seek not your fleet, but sally from the wall; So Jove once more may drive their routed train, And Troy lie trembling in her walls again."
    Book 12 (59% in)
  • On other works though Troy with fury fall, And pour her armies o'er our batter'd wall: There Greece has strength: but this, this part o'erthrown, Her strength were vain; I dread for you alone: Here Hector rages like the force of fire, Vaunts of his gods, and calls high Jove his sire: If yet some heavenly power your breast excite, Breathe in your hearts, and string your arms to fight, Greece yet may live, her threaten'd fleet maintain: And Hector's force, and Jove's own aid, be vain."
    Book 13 (10% in)
  • ...which a wounded soldier touch'd his breast, Whom in the chance of war a javelin tore, And his sad comrades from the battle bore; Him to the surgeons of the camp he sent: That office paid, he issued from his tent Fierce for the fight: to whom the god begun, In Thoas' voice, Andraemon's valiant son, Who ruled where Calydon's white rocks arise, And Pleuron's chalky cliffs emblaze the skies: "Where's now the imperious vaunt, the daring boast, Of Greece victorious, and proud Ilion lost?"
    Book 13 (30% in)
  • The king consented, by his vaunts abused; The king consented, but the fates refused.
    Book 13 (46% in)
  • Then Idomen, insulting o'er the slain: "Behold, Deiphobus! nor vaunt in vain: See! on one Greek three Trojan ghosts attend; This, my third victim, to the shades I send.
    Book 13 (54% in)
  • Enormous boaster! doom'd to vaunt in vain.
    Book 13 (98% in)
  • Lo! still he vaunts, and threats the fleet with fires, While stern Achilles in his wrath retires.
    Book 14 (70% in)
  • Jove is with us; I saw his hand, but now, From the proud archer strike his vaunted bow: Indulgent Jove! how plain thy favours shine, When happy nations bear the marks divine!
    Book 15 (64% in)
  • And if to this my lance thy fate be given, Vain are thy vaunts; success is still from heaven: This, instant, sends thee down to Pluto's coast; Mine is the glory, his thy parting ghost."
    Book 16 (72% in)
  • Not thus the lion glories in his might, Nor panther braves his spotted foe in fight, Nor thus the boar (those terrors of the plain;) Man only vaunts his force, and vaunts in vain.
    Book 17 (5% in)
  • Not thus the lion glories in his might, Nor panther braves his spotted foe in fight, Nor thus the boar (those terrors of the plain;) Man only vaunts his force, and vaunts in vain.
    Book 17 (5% in)
  • Of old, she stalk'd amid the bright abodes; And Jove himself, the sire of men and gods, The world's great ruler, felt her venom'd dart; Deceived by Juno's wiles, and female art: For when Alcmena's nine long months were run, And Jove expected his immortal son, To gods and goddesses the unruly joy He show'd, and vaunted of his matchless boy: 'From us, (he said) this day an infant springs, Fated to rule, and born a king of kings.'
    Book 19 (26% in)
  • Then lift thy weapon for a noble blow, Nor fear the vaunting of a mortal foe.
    Book 20 (26% in)
  • Think, Hector leads you on; Nor dread the vaunts of Peleus' haughty son.
    Book 20 (71% in)
  • To the forbidden field he takes his flight, In the first folly of a youthful knight, To vaunt his swiftness wheels around the plain, But vaunts not long, with all his swiftness slain: Struck where the crossing belts unite behind, And golden rings the double back-plate join'd Forth through the navel burst the thrilling steel; And on his knees with piercing shrieks he fell; The rushing entrails pour'd upon the ground His hands collect; and darkness wraps him round.
    Book 20 (81% in)
  • To the forbidden field he takes his flight, In the first folly of a youthful knight, To vaunt his swiftness wheels around the plain, But vaunts not long, with all his swiftness slain: Struck where the crossing belts unite behind, And golden rings the double back-plate join'd Forth through the navel burst the thrilling steel; And on his knees with piercing shrieks he fell; The rushing entrails pour'd upon the ground His hands collect; and darkness wraps him round.
    Book 20 (81% in)
  • How durst thou vaunt thy watery progeny?
    Book 21 (30% in)
  • Silent he heard the queen of woods upbraid: Not so Saturnia bore the vaunting maid: But furious thus: "What insolence has driven Thy pride to face the majesty of heaven?
    Book 21 (77% in)

There are no more uses of "vaunted" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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