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valor
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

23 uses
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Definition
exceptional or heroic courage when facing danger — especially in battle
  • Then great Diores fell, by doom divine, In vain his valour and illustrious line.
    Book 4 (94% in)
  • ...possible, indeed, that in its leading outline, the Iliad may be true to historic fact, that in the great maritime expedition of western Greece against the rival and half-kindred empire of the Laomedontiadae, the chieftain of Thessaly, from his valour and the number of his forces, may have been the most important ally of the Peloponnesian sovereign; the preeminent value of the ancient poetry on the Trojan war may thus have forced the national feeling of the Athenians to yield to their...
    Introduction (55% in)
  • His characters of valour are much alike; even that of Turnus seems no way peculiar, but, as it is, in a superior degree; and we see nothing that differences the courage of Mnestheus from that of Sergestus, Cloanthus, or the rest, In like manner it may be remarked of Statius's heroes, that an air of impetuosity runs through them all; the same horrid and savage courage appears in his Capaneus, Tydeus, Hippomedon, &c.
    Preface (22% in)
  • Of all the kings (the god's distinguish'd care) To power superior none such hatred bear: Strife and debate thy restless soul employ, And wars and horrors are thy savage joy, If thou hast strength, 'twas Heaven that strength bestow'd; For know, vain man! thy valour is from God.
    Book 1 (33% in)
  • ...crime, and thence derives the woes: Myself the first the assembled chiefs incline To avert the vengeance of the power divine; Then rising in his wrath, the monarch storm'd; Incensed he threaten'd, and his threats perform'd: The fair Chryseis to her sire was sent, With offer'd gifts to make the god relent; But now he seized Briseis' heavenly charms, And of my valour's prize defrauds my arms, Defrauds the votes of all the Grecian train;(63) And service, faith, and justice, plead in vain.
    Book 1 (66% in)
  • "Brave men!" he cries, (to such who boldly dare Urge their swift steeds to face the coming war), "Your ancient valour on the foes approve; Jove is with Greece, and let us trust in Jove.
    Book 4 (44% in)
  • Sarpedon first his ardent soul express'd, And, turn'd to Hector, these bold words address'd: "Say, chief, is all thy ancient valour lost?
    Book 5 (52% in)
  • On valour's side the odds of combat lie, The brave live glorious, or lamented die; The wretch who trembles in the field of fame, Meets death, and worse than death, eternal shame!"
    Book 5 (59% in)
  • "A city stands on Argos' utmost bound, (Argos the fair, for warlike steeds renown'd,) Aeolian Sisyphus, with wisdom bless'd, In ancient time the happy wall possess'd, Then call'd Ephyre: Glaucus was his son; Great Glaucus, father of Bellerophon, Who o'er the sons of men in beauty shined, Loved for that valour which preserves mankind.
    Book 6 (31% in)
  • Then hear, Achilles! be of better mind; Revere thy roof, and to thy guests be kind; And know the men of all the Grecian host, Who honour worth, and prize thy valour most.
    Book 9 (91% in)
  • Such then I was, impell'd by youthful blood; So proved my valour for my country's good.
    Book 11 (91% in)
  • 'tis ours, the dignity they give to grace; The first in valour, as the first in place; That when with wondering eyes our martial bands Behold our deeds transcending our commands, Such, they may cry, deserve the sovereign state, Whom those that envy dare not imitate!
    Book 12 (69% in)
  • Several deeds of valour are performed; Meriones, losing his spear in the encounter, repairs to seek another at the tent of Idomeneus: this occasions a conversation between those two warriors, who return together to the battle.
    Book 13 (1% in)
  • To this, Idomeneus: "The fields of fight Have proved thy valour, and unconquer'd might: And were some ambush for the foes design'd, Even there thy courage would not lag behind: In that sharp service, singled from the rest, The fear of each, or valour, stands confess'd.
    Book 13 (36% in)
  • To this, Idomeneus: "The fields of fight Have proved thy valour, and unconquer'd might: And were some ambush for the foes design'd, Even there thy courage would not lag behind: In that sharp service, singled from the rest, The fear of each, or valour, stands confess'd.
    Book 13 (36% in)
  • Hector (this said) rush'd forward on the foes: With equal ardour Melanippus glows: Then Ajax thus—"O Greeks! respect your fame, Respect yourselves, and learn an honest shame: Let mutual reverence mutual warmth inspire, And catch from breast to breast the noble fire, On valour's side the odds of combat lie; The brave live glorious, or lamented die; The wretch that trembles in the field of fame, Meets death, and worse than death, eternal shame."
    Book 15 (74% in)
  • He, loved of Jove, had launch'd for Ilion's shores Full fifty vessels, mann'd with fifty oars: Five chosen leaders the fierce bands obey, Himself supreme in valour, as in sway.
    Book 16 (22% in)
  • There have been heroes, who, by virtuous care, By valour, numbers, and by arts of war, Have forced the powers to spare a sinking state, And gain'd at length the glorious odds of fate: But you, when fortune smiles, when Jove declares His partial favour, and assists your wars, Your shameful efforts 'gainst yourselves employ, And force the unwilling god to ruin Troy."
    Book 17 (46% in)
  • (for the gods are thine) In valour matchless, and in force divine!
    Book 21 (33% in)
  • Even now perhaps, ere yet I turn the wall, The fierce Achilles sees me, and I fall: Such is his swiftness, 'tis in vain to fly, And such his valour, that who stands must die.
    Book 21 (92% in)
  • Then the hero, given up to the most lively despair, prepares to fight; he receives from a divinity new armour, is reconciled with his general and, thirsting for glory and revenge, enacts prodigies of valour, recovers the victory, slays the enemy's chief, honours his friend with superb funeral rites, and exercises a cruel vengeance on the body of his destroyer; but finally appeased by the tears and prayers of the father of the slain warrior, restores to the old man the corpse of his...
    Footnotes (13% in)
  • The greatest efforts were made by the Trojans to possess themselves of the body, which was however rescued and borne off to the Grecian camp by the valour of Ajax and Ulysses.
    Footnotes (90% in)
  • * * * * If none my matchless valour dares oppose, How long shall Dares wait his dastard foes?
    Footnotes (93% in)

There are no more uses of "valor" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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