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conflict
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

18 uses
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Definition
a struggle or disagreement
in various senses, including:
  • a serious disagreement — as in "political conflict"
  • the tension from two opposing ideas or feelings — as in "I'm conflicted about where I should go to college."
  • a violent fight or war — as in "the Israeli-Palestinian conflict"
  • an idiom that refers to tension between responsibilities to different entities — "conflict of interest"
  • After this conflict keen of angry speech, The chiefs arose, the assembly was dispers'd.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (50% in)
  • Thus while he spake, Achilles chaf'd with rage; And in his manly breast his heart was torn With thoughts conflicting—whether from his side To draw his mighty sword, and thrusting by Th' assembled throng, to kill th' insulting King; Or school his soul, and keep his anger down.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (33% in)
  • ...should dare the fight, Bid that the Trojans and the Grecians all Be seated on the ground; and in the midst The warlike Menelaus and myself Stand front to front, for Helen and the spoils Of war to combat; and whoe'er shall prove The better man in conflict, let him bear The woman and the spoils in triumph home; While ye, the rest, in peace and friendship sworn, Shall still possess the fertile plains of Troy; And to their native Argos they return, For noble steeds and lovely women fam'd."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (16% in)
  • He asks through me that all the host of Troy And Grecian warriors shall upon the ground Lay down their glitt'ring arms; while in the midst The warlike Menelaus and himself Stand front to front, for Helen and the spoils Of war to combat; and whoe'er shall prove The better man in conflict, let him bear The woman and the spoils in triumph home, While we, the rest, firm peace and friendship swear."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (20% in)
  • When to the midst they came, together rush'd Bucklers and lances, and the furious might Of mail-clad warriors; bossy shield on shield Clatter'd in conflict; loud the clamour rose.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (79% in)
  • The Greeks too from the battle-field convey'd The slain Tlepolemus; Ulysses saw, Patient of spirit, but deeply mov'd at heart; And with conflicting thoughts his breast was torn, If first he should pursue the Thund'rer's son, Or deal destruction on the Lycian host.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (73% in)
  • For in the glorious conflict heretofore I ne'er have seen thee; but in daring now Thou far surpassest all, who hast not fear'd To face my spear; of most unhappy sires The children they, who my encounter meet.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (22% in)
  • To whom the blue-ey'd Goddess thus replied: "So be it, Archer-King; with like intent I from Olympus came; but say, what means Wilt thou devise to bid the conflict cease?"
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (8% in)
  • Ajax meanwhile in dazzling brass was clad; And when his armour all was duly donn'd, Forward he mov'd, as when gigantic Mars Leads nations forth to war, whom Saturn's son In life-destroying conflict hath involv'd; So mov'd the giant Ajax, prop of Greece, With sternly smiling mien; with haughty stride He trod the plain, and pois'd his pond'rous spear.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (41% in)
  • When in the midst they met, together rush'd Bucklers and lances, and the furious might Of mail-clad warriors; bossy shield on shield Clatter'd in conflict; loud the clamour rose: Then rose too mingled shouts and groans of men Slaying and slain; the earth ran red with blood.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (11% in)
  • How hand to hand around Ascalaphus Rag'd the fierce conflict: first Deiphobus From off his head the glitt'ring helmet tore; But, terrible as Mars, Meriones Sprang forth, and pierc'd his arm; and from his hand With hollow sound the crested helmet fell.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (62% in)
  • Wrought on his brother's mind the hero's words: Together both they bent their steps, where rag'd The fiercest conflict; there Cebriones, Phalces, Orthaeus, brave Polydamas, Palmys, and godlike Polyphetes' might, And Morys, and Ascanius fought; these two Hippotion's sons; from rich Ascania's plains They, as reliefs, but yestermorn had come; Impell'd by Jove, they sought the battle field.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (91% in)
  • The son of Saturn pitying saw, and thus To Juno spoke, his sister and his wife: "Woe, woe! that fate decrees my best-belov'd, Sarpedon, by Patroclus' hand to fall; E'en now conflicting thoughts my soul divide, To bear him from the fatal strife unhurt, And set him down on Lycia's fertile plains, Or leave him by Patroclus' hand to fall."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (49% in)
  • He said; and they, with martial ardour fir'd, Rush'd to the conflict.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (64% in)
  • Then nor the valiant Lycians held their ground; All fled in terror, as they saw their King Pierc'd through the heart, amid a pile of dead; For o'er his body many a warrior fell, When Saturn's son the conflict fierce inflam'd.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (74% in)
  • The head, with grasp unyielding, Hector held; Patroclus seiz'd the foot; and, crowding round, Trojans and Greeks in stubborn conflict clos'd.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (86% in)
  • Again around Patroclus' body rag'd The stubborn conflict, direful, sorrow-fraught: From Heav'n descending, Pallas stirr'd the strife, Sent by all-seeing Jove to stimulate The warlike Greeks; so changed was now his will.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (69% in)
  • To whom in answer sage Ulysses thus: "Brave as thou art, Achilles, godlike chief, Yet fasting lead not forth the sons of Greece To fight the Trojans; for no little time Will last the struggle, when the serried ranks Are once engag'd in conflict, and the Gods With equal courage either side inspire: But bid them, by the ships, of food and wine (Wherein are strength and courage) first partake; For none throughout the day till set of sun, Fasting from food, may bear the toils of war; His...
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (35% in)

There are no more uses of "conflict" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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