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Agamemnon
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

160 uses
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Definition
Greek mythology:  the king who lead the Greeks against Troy in the Trojan War
  • THE CONTENTION OF ACHILLES AND AGAMEMNON.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (0% in)
  • In the war of Troy, the Greeks having sacked some of the neighbouring towns, and taken from thence two beautiful captives, Chryseis and Briseis, allotted the first to Agamemnon, and the last to Achilles.
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  • The priest being refused, and insolently dismissed by Agamemnon, entreats for vengeance from his god, who inflicts a pestilence on the Greeks.
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  • BOOK I. Of Peleus' son, Achilles, sing, O Muse, The vengeance, deep and deadly; whence to Greece Unnumbered ills arose; which many a soul Of mighty warriors to the viewless shades Untimely sent; they on the battle plain Unburied lay, a prey to rav'ning dogs, And carrion birds; but so had Jove decreed, From that sad day when first in wordy war, The mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Confronted stood by Peleus' godlike son.
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  • Him answer'd thus Achilles, swift of foot: "Speak boldly out whate'er thine art can tell; For by Apollo's self I swear, whom thou, O Calchas, serv'st, and who thy words inspires, That, while I live, and see the light of Heav'n, Not one of all the Greeks shall dare on thee, Beside our ships, injurious hands to lay: No, not if Agamemnon's self were he, Who 'mid our warriors boasts the foremost place."
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  • Embolden'd thus, th' unerring prophet spoke: "Not for neglected hecatombs or pray'rs, But for his priest, whom Agamemnon scorn'd, Nor took his ransom, nor his child restor'd; On his account the Far-destroyer sends This scourge of pestilence, and yet will send; Nor shall we cease his heavy hand to feel, Till to her sire we give the bright-ey'd girl, Unbought, unransom'd, and to Chrysa's shore A solemn hecatomb despatch; this done, The God, appeas'd, his anger may remit."
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  • This said, he sat; and Atreus' godlike son, The mighty monarch, Agamemnon, rose, His dark soul fill'd with fury, and his eyes Flashing like flames of fire; on Calchas first A with'ring glance he cast, and thus he spoke; "Prophet of ill! thou never speak'st to me But words of evil omen; for thy soul Delights to augur ill, but aught of good Thou never yet hast promis'd, nor perform'd.
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  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "Think not, Achilles, valiant though thou art In fight, and godlike, to defraud me thus; Thou shalt not so persuade me, nor o'erreach.
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  • Whom answer'd Agamemnon, King of men: "Fly then, if such thy mind!
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  • To whom the monarch, Agamemnon, thus: "O father, full of wisdom are thy words; But this proud chief o'er all would domineer; O'er all he seeks to rule, o'er all to reign, To all to dictate; which I will not bear.
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  • ...Achilles, plung'd In bitter grief, from all the band apart, Upon the margin of the hoary sea Sat idly gazing on the dark-blue waves; And to his Goddess-mother long he pray'd, With outstretch'd hands, "Oh, mother! since thy son To early death by destiny is doom'd, I might have hop'd the Thunderer on high, Olympian Jove, with honour would have crown'd My little space; but now disgrace is mine; Since Agamemnon, the wide-ruling King, Hath wrested from me, and still holds, my prize."
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  • He, mightier than his father, took his seat By Saturn's side, in pride of conscious strength: Fear seiz'd on all the Gods, nor did they dare To bind their King: of this remind him now, And clasp his knees, and supplicate his aid For Troy's brave warriors, that the routed Greeks Back to their ships with slaughter may be driv'n; That all may taste the folly of their King, And Agamemnon's haughty self may mourn The slight on Grecia's bravest warrior cast."
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  • Her to the altar straight Ulysses led, The wise in counsel; in her father's hand He plac'd the maiden, and address'd him thus: "Chryses, from Agamemnon, King of men, To thee I come, thy daughter to restore; And to thy God, upon the Greeks' behalf, To offer sacrifice, if haply so We may appease his wrath, who now incens'd With grievous suff'ring visits all our host."
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  • Avenge my hapless son, Of mortals shortest-liv'd, insulted now By mighty Agamemnon, King of men, And plunder'd of his lawful spoils of war.
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  • Jupiter, in pursuance of the request of Thetis, sends a deceitful vision to Agamemnon, persuading him to lead the army to battle in order to make the Greeks sensible of their want of Achilles.
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  • Thus as he mus'd, the wisest course appear'd By a deluding vision to mislead The son of Atreus; and with winged words Thus to a phantom form he gave command: "Hie thee, deluding Vision, to the camp And ships of Greece, to Agamemnon's tent; There, changing nought, as I command thee, speak.
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  • He said: the Vision heard, and straight obey'd: Swiftly he sped, and reached the Grecian ships, And sought the son of Atreus; him he found Within his tent, wrapped in ambrosial sleep; Above his head he stood, like Neleus' son, Nestor, whom Agamemnon rev'renc'd most Of all the Elders; in his likeness cloth'd Thus spoke the heav'nly Vision; "Sleep'st thou, son Of Atreus, valiant warrior, horseman bold?
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  • But first, of all the Elders, by the side Of Nestor's ship, the aged Pylian chief, A secret conclave Agamemnon call'd; And, prudent, thus the chosen few address'd: "Hear me, my friends!
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  • At length they all were seated, and awhile Their clamours sank to silence; then uprose The monarch Agamemnon, in his hand His royal staff, the work of Vulcan's art; Which Vulcan to the son of Saturn gave; To Hermes he, the heav'nly messenger; Hermes to Pelops, matchless charioteer; Pelops to Atreus; Atreus at his death Bequeath'd it to Thyestes, wealthy Lord Of num'rous herds; to Agamemnon last Thyestes left it; token of his sway O'er all the Argive coast, and neighbouring isles.
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  • At length they all were seated, and awhile Their clamours sank to silence; then uprose The monarch Agamemnon, in his hand His royal staff, the work of Vulcan's art; Which Vulcan to the son of Saturn gave; To Hermes he, the heav'nly messenger; Hermes to Pelops, matchless charioteer; Pelops to Atreus; Atreus at his death Bequeath'd it to Thyestes, wealthy Lord Of num'rous herds; to Agamemnon last Thyestes left it; token of his sway O'er all the Argive coast, and neighbouring isles.
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  • Against Achilles and Ulysses most His hate was turn'd; on them his venom pour'd; Anon, at Agamemnon's self he launch'd His loud-tongued ribaldry; 'gainst him he knew Incensed the public mind; and bawling loud, [1] With scurril words, he thus address'd the King: "What more, thou son of Atreus, would'st thou have?
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  • On Agamemnon, leader of the host, With words like these Thersites pour'd his hate; But straight Ulysses at his side appear'd, And spoke, with scornful glance, in stern rebuke: "Thou babbling fool, Thersites, prompt of speech, Restrain thy tongue, nor singly thus presume The Kings to slander; thou, the meanest far Of all that with the Atridae came to Troy.
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  • Be well advis'd thyself, and others lead By wholesome counsel; for the words I speak Are not to be despis'd; by tribes and clans, O Agamemnon! range thy troops, that so Tribe may to tribe give aid, and clan to clan.
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  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "Father, in council, of the sons of Greece, None can compare with thee; and would to Jove To Pallas, and Apollo, at my side I had but ten such counsellors as thee!
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  • Around the ox they stood, and on his head The salt cake sprinkled; then amid them all The monarch Agamemnon pray'd aloud: "Most great, most glorious Jove! who dwell'st on high, In clouds and darkness veil'd, grant Thou that ere This sun shall set, and night o'erspread the earth, I may the haughty walls of Priam's house Lay prostrate in the dust; and burn with fire His lofty gates; and strip from Hector's breast His sword-rent tunic, while around his corpse Many brave comrades,...
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  • The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, Gerenian Nestor thus his speech began: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Great Atreus' son, no longer let us pause, The work delaying which the pow'rs of Heav'n Have trusted to our hands; do thou forthwith Bid that the heralds proclamation make, And summon through the camp the brass-clad Greeks; While, in a body, through the wide-spread ranks We pass, and stimulate their warlike zeal."
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  • He said; and Agamemnon, King of men, Obedient to his counsel, gave command That to the war the clear-voic'd heralds call The long-hair'd Greeks: they gave the word, and straight From ev'ry quarter throng'd the eager crowd.
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  • And as experienced goat-herds, when their flocks Are mingled in the pasture, portion out Their sev'ral charges, so the chiefs array'd Their squadrons for the fight; while in the midst The mighty monarch Agamemnon mov'd: His eye, and lofty brow, the counterpart Of Jove, the Lord of thunder; in his girth Another Mars, with Neptune's ample chest.
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  • Who in Mycenae's well-built fortress dwelt, And wealthy Corinth, and Cleone fair, Orneia, and divine Araethure, And Sicyon, where Adrastus reign'd of old, And Gonoessa's promontory steep, And Hyperesia, and Pellene's rock; In AEgium, and the scatter'd towns that he Along the beach, and wide-spread Helice; Of these a hundred ships obey'd the rule Of mighty Agamemnon, Atreus' son.
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  • The ships, wherewith they crossed the dark-blue sea, Were giv'n by Agamemnon, King of men, The son of Atreus; for th' Arcadian youth Had ne'er to maritime pursuits been train'd.
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  • For with Achilles, and the steeds that bore The matchless son of Peleus, none might vie: But 'mid his beaked ocean-going ships He lay, with Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Indignant; while his troops upon the beach With quoits and jav'lins whil'd away the day, And feats of archery; their steeds the while The lotus-grass and marsh-grown parsley cropp'd, Each standing near their car; the well-wrought cars Lay all unheeded in the warriors' tents; They, inly pining for their godlike chief, Roam'd...
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  • Agamemnon, on the part of the Grecians, demands the restoration of Helen, and the performance of the articles.
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  • At him the long-haired Grecians bent their bows, Prompt to assail with arrows and with stones; But loud the monarch Agamemnon's voice Was heard; "Hold, Argives, hold! ye sons of Greece, Shoot not! for Hector of the glancing helm Hath, as it seems, some message to impart."
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  • Two heralds to the city Hector sent To bring the lambs, and aged Priam call; While Agamemnon to the hollow ships, Their lamb to bring, in haste Talthybius sent: He heard, and straight the monarch's voice obey'd.
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  • But to thy question; I will tell thee true; Yon chief is Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Wide-reigning, mighty monarch, ruler good, And valiant warrior; in my husband's name, Lost as I am, I call'd him brother once."
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  • Uprose then Agamemnon, King of men, Uprose the sage Ulysses; to the front The heralds brought the off'rings to the Gods, And in the flagon mix'd the wine, and pour'd The hallowing water on the monarchs' hands.
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  • ...follow'd; and while there reclin'd Upon the richly-inlaid couch they lay, Atrides, like a lion baffled, rush'd Amid the crowd, if haply he might find The godlike Paris; but not one of all The Trojans and their brave allies could aid The warlike Menelaus in his search; Not that, for love, would any one that knew Have screen'd him from his anger, for they all Abhorr'd him as the shade of death: then thus Outspoke great Agamemnon, King of men: "Hear me, ye Trojans, Dardans, and Allies!
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (95% in)
  • Agamemnon is distinguished in all the parts of a good general; he reviews the troops, and exhorts the leaders, some by praises, and others by reproofs.
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  • Great Agamemnon shudder'd as he saw The crimson drops out-welling from the wound; Shudder'd the warlike Menelaus' self; But when not buried in his flesh he saw The barb and sinew, back his spirit came.
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  • Then deeply groaning, Agamemnon spoke, As Menelaus by the hand he held, And with him groan'd his comrades: "Brother dear, I wrought thy death when late, on compact sworn, I sent thee forth alone for Greece to fight; Wounded by Trojans, who their plighted faith Have trodden under foot; but not in vain Are solemn cov'nants and the blood of lambs, The treaty wine outpoured, and hand-plight given, Wherein men place their trust; if not at once, Yet soon or late will Jove assert their claim;...
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (27% in)
  • Thy work undone; and with insulting scorn Some vaunting Trojan, leaping on the tomb Of noble Menelaus, thus shall say: 'On all his foes may Agamemnon so His wrath accomplish, who hath hither led Of Greeks a mighty army, all in vain; And bootless home with empty ships hath gone, And valiant Menelaus left behind;' Thus when men speak, gape, earth, and hide my shame."
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  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "Dear Menelaus, may thy words be true!
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  • In Agamemnon then no trace was seen Of laggard sloth, no shrinking from the fight, But full of ardour to the field he rush'd.
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  • ...round their skilful chief Idomeneus, the warlike bands of Crete Were arming for the fight; Idomeneus, Of courage stubborn as the forest boar, The foremost ranks array'd; Meriones The rearmost squadrons had in charge; with joy The monarch Agamemnon saw, and thus With accents bland Idomeneus address'd: "Idomeneus, above all other Greeks, In battle and elsewhere, I honour thee; And in the banquet, where the noblest mix The ruddy wine for chiefs alone reserved, Though others drink their...
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  • He said, and Agamemnon went his way Rejoicing; through the crowd he pass'd, and came Where stood th' Ajaces; them, in act to arm, Amid a cloud of infantry he found; And as a goat-herd from his watch-tow'r crag Beholds a cloud advancing o'er the sea, By Zephyr's breath impell'd; as from afar He gazes, black as pitch, it sweeps along O'er the dark ocean's face, and with it brings A hurricane of rain; he, shudd'ring, sees, And drives his flock beneath the shelt'ring cave: So thick and...
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (48% in)
  • Well pleas'd, the monarch Agamemnon saw, And thus address'd them: "Valiant chiefs, to you, The leaders of the brass-clad Greeks, I give ('Twere needless and unseemly) no commands; For well ye understand your troops to rouse To deeds of dauntless courage; would to Jove, To Pallas and Apollo, that such mind As is in you, in all the camp were found; Then soon should Priam's lofty city fall, Tak'n and destroy'd by our victorious hands."
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  • Thus he, experienc'd in the wars of old; Well pleas'd, the monarch Agamemnon saw, And thus address'd him; "Would to Heav'n, old man, That, as thy spirit, such too were thy strength And vigour of thy limbs; but now old age, The common lot of mortals, weighs thee down; Would I could see some others in thy place, And thou couldst still be numbered with the young!"
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  • He said; and Agamemnon went his way, Rejoicing: to Menestheus next he came, The son of Peteus, charioteer renown'd; Him found he, circled by th' Athenian bands, The raisers of the war-cry; close beside The sage Ulysses stood, around him rang'd, Not unrenown'd, the Cephalonian troops: The sound of battle had not reach'd their ears; For but of late the Greek and Trojan hosts Were set in motion; they expecting stood, Till other Grecian columns should advance, Assail the Trojans, and renew...
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (59% in)
  • To whom thus Diomed, with stern regard: "Father, be silent; hearken to my words: I blame not Agamemnon, King of men, Who thus to battle stirs the well-greav'd Greeks: His will the glory be if we o'ercome The valiant Trojans, and their city take; Great too his loss if they o'er us prevail: Then come, let us too for the fight prepare."
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  • The Greeks drove back the Trojan host; the chiefs Slew each his victim; Agamemnon first, The mighty monarch, from his chariot hurl'd Hodius, the sturdy Halizonian chief, Him, as he turn'd, between the shoulder-blades The jav'lin struck, and through his chest was driv'n; Thund'ring he fell, and loud his armour rang.
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  • Through all the army Agamemnon pass'd, And cried, "Brave comrades, quit ye now like men; Bear a stout heart; and in the stubborn fight, Let each to other mutual succour give; By mutual succour more are sav'd than fall; In timid flight nor fame nor safety lies."
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  • His shield the monarch Agamemnon struck; The shield's defence was vain; the spear pass'd through Beneath the belt, and in his groin was lodg'd; Thund'ring he fell, and loud his armour rang.
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  • Antilochus, the son of Nestor, smote With gleaming lance Ablerus; Elatus By Agamemnon, King of men, was slain, Who dwelt by Satnois' widely-flowing stream, Upon the lofty heights of Pedasus.
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  • Fierce Agamemnon cried in stern rebuke; "Soft-hearted Menelaus, why of life So tender?
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  • Thus as he spoke, his counsel, fraught with death, His brother's purpose chang'd; he with his hand Adrastus thrust aside, whom with his lance Fierce Agamemnon through the loins transfix'd; And, as he roll'd in death, upon his breast Planting his foot, the ashen spear withdrew.
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  • Priam sends a herald to make this offer, and to demand a truce for burning the dead, the last of which only is agreed to by Agamemnon.
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  • Great Agamemnon's self, wide-ruling King, Seizing his hand, address'd him thus by name: "What!
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  • The old man spoke reproachful; at his words Up rose nine warriors: far before the rest, The monarch Agamemnon, King of men; Next Tydeus' son, the valiant Diomed; The two Ajaces, cloth'd with courage high; Idomeneus, and of Idomeneus The faithful follower, brave Meriones, Equal in fight to blood-stain'd Mars; with these Eurypylus, Euaemon's noble son; Thoas, Andraemon's son; Ulysses last: These all with Hector offer'd to contend.
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  • He said: each mark'd his sev'ral lot, and all Together threw in Agamemnon's helm.
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  • But when to Agamemnon's tents they came, The King of men to Saturn's royal son A bullock slew, a male of five years old; The carcase then they flay'd; and cutting up, Sever'd the joints; then fixing on the spits, Roasted with care, and from the fire withdrew.
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  • He said; and they, obedient to his word, Throughout the ranks prepar'd the wonted meal: But with the morning to the ships of Greece Idaeus took his way: in council there By Agamemnon's leading ship he found The Grecian chiefs, the ministers of Mars: And 'mid them all the clear-voic'd herald spoke: "Ye sons of Atreus, and ye chiefs of Greece, From Priam, and the gallant sons of Troy, I come, to bear, if ye be pleas'd to hear, The words of Paris, cause of all this war: The goods which...
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  • Then to Idaeus Agamemnon thus: "Idaeus, thou hast heard what answer give The chiefs of Greece—their answer I approve.
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  • Then not Idomeneus, nor Atreus' son, The mighty Agamemnon, kept their ground, Nor either Ajax, ministers of Mars; Gerenian Nestor, aged prop of Greece, Alone remain'd, and he against his will, His horse sore wounded by an arrow shot By godlike Paris, fair-hair'd Helen's Lord: Just on the crown, where close behind the head First springs the mane, the deadliest spot of all, The arrow struck him; madden'd with the pain He rear'd, then plunging forward, with the shaft Fix'd in his brain,...
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  • Next to Tydides, Agamemnon came, And Menelaus, Atreus' godlike sons; Th' Ajaces both, in dauntless courage cloth'd; Idomeneus, with whom Meriones, His faithful comrade, terrible as Mars; Eurypylus, Euaemon's noble son; The ninth was Teucer, who, with bended bow, Behind the shield of Ajax Telamon Took shelter; Ajax o'er him held his shield; Thence look'd he round, and aim'd amid the crowd; And as he saw each Trojan, wounded, fall, Struck by his shafts, to Ajax close he press'd, As to...
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  • Him Agamemnon, with his well-strung bow Thinning the Trojan ranks, with joy beheld, And, standing at his side, address'd him thus: "Teucer, good comrade, son of Telamon, Shoot ever thus, if thou wouldst be the light And glory of the Greeks, and of thy sire, Who nursed thine infancy, and in his house Maintain'd, though bastard; him, though distant far, To highest fame let thine achievements raise.
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  • Agamemnon, after the last day's defeat, proposes to the Greeks to quit the siege, and return to their country.
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  • Agamemnon pursues this advice, and Nestor farther prevails upon him to send ambassadors to Achilles in order to move him to a reconciliation.
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  • This duty on the younger men I lay: Then, Agamemnon, thou thy part perform; For thou art King supreme; the Elders all, As meet and seemly, to the feast invite: Thy tents are full of wine, which Grecian ships O'er the wide sea bring day by day from Thrace; Nor lack'st thou aught thy guests to entertain, And many own thy sway; when all are met, His counsel take, who gives the best advice; Great need we have of counsel wise and good, When close beside our ships the hostile fires Are...
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (9% in)
  • Then for th' assembled Elders in his tent An ample banquet Agamemnon spread; They on the viands, set before them, fell: The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, The aged Nestor first his mind disclos'd He who, before, the sagest counsel gave, Now thus with prudent words began, and said: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, With thee, Atrides, my discourse shall end, With thee begin: o'er many nations thou Hold'st sov'reign sway; since Jove to thee hath giv'n The sceptre, and the high...
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (12% in)
  • ...Agamemnon spread; They on the viands, set before them, fell: The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, The aged Nestor first his mind disclos'd He who, before, the sagest counsel gave, Now thus with prudent words began, and said: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, With thee, Atrides, my discourse shall end, With thee begin: o'er many nations thou Hold'st sov'reign sway; since Jove to thee hath giv'n The sceptre, and the high prerogative, To be thy people's judge and counsellor, 'Tis...
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (13% in)
  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "Father, too truly thou recall'st my fault: I err'd, nor will deny it; as a host Is he whom Jove in honour holds, as now Achilles hon'ring, he confounds the Greeks, But if I err'd, by evil impulse led, Fain would I now conciliate him, and pay An ample penalty; before you all I pledge myself rich presents to bestow.
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  • To whom Gerenian Nestor thus replied: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Atrides, not unworthy are the gifts, Which to Achilles thou design'st to send: Then to the tent of Peleus' son in haste Let us our chosen messengers despatch: Whom I shall choose, let them consent to go.
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  • Then, their libations made, when each with wine Had satisfied his soul, from out the tent Of Agamemnon, Atreus' son, they pass'd; And many a caution aged Nestor gave, With rapid glance to each, Ulysses chief, How best to soften Peleus' matchless son.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (24% in)
  • The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, Ajax to Phoenix sign'd: Ulysses saw The sign, and rising, fill'd a cup with wine, And pledg'd Achilles thus: "To thee I drink, Achilles! nobly is thy table spread, As heretofore in Agamemnon's tent, So now in thine; abundant is the feast: But not the pleasures of the banquet now We have in hand: impending o'er our arms Grave cause of fear, illustrious chief, we see; Grave doubts, to save, or see destroy'd our ships, If thou, great warrior, put...
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (31% in)
  • Such were the words thine aged father spoke, Which thou hast now forgotten; yet, e'en now, Pause for awhile, and let thine anger cool; And noble gifts, so thou thy wrath remit, From Agamemnon shalt thou bear away.
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  • On me nor Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Nor others shall prevail, since nought is gain'd By toil unceasing in the battle field.
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  • Twelve cities have I taken with my ships; Eleven more by land, on Trojan soil: From all of these abundant stores of wealth I took, and all to Agamemnon gave; He, safe beside his ships, my spoils receiv'd, A few divided, but the most retain'd.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (46% in)
  • There did I leave abundant store of wealth, When hitherward I took my luckless way; Thither from hence I bear, of ruddy gold, And brass, and women fair, and iron hoar The share assign'd me; but my chiefest prize The monarch Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Himself who gave, with insult takes away.
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  • ...and spurn; himself I hold At a hair's worth; and would he proffer me Tenfold or twentyfold of all he has, Or ever may be his; or all the gold Sent to Orchomenos or royal Thebes, Egyptian, treasurehouse of countless wealth, Who boasts her hundred gates, through each of which With horse and car two hundred warriors march: Nay, were his gifts in number as the sand, Or dust upon the plain, yet ne'er will I By Agamemnon be prevail'd upon, Till I have paid him back my heart's offence.
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  • Nor e'er of Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Will I a daughter wed; not were she fair As golden Venus, and in works renown'd As Pallas, blue-ey'd Maid, yet her e'en so I wed not; let him choose some other Greek, Some fitting match, of nobler blood than mine.
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  • At length, in tears, the aged Phoenix spoke, For greatly fear'd he for the ships of Greece: "If, great Achilles, on returning home Thy mind is set, nor canst thou be induc'd To save the ships from fire, so fierce thy wrath; How then, dear boy, can I remain behind, Alone? whom with thee aged Peleus sent, That day when he in Agamemnon's cause From Phthia sent thee, inexperienc'd yet In all the duties of confed'rate war, And sage debate, on which attends renown.
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  • Whom answer'd thus Achilles, swift of foot: "Illustrious Ajax, son of Telamon, Without offence hast thou thy message giv'n; But fury fills my soul, whene'er I think How Agamemnon, 'mid th' assembled Greeks, Insulting, held me forth to public scorn, As some dishonour'd, houseless vagabond.
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  • First Agamemnon, King of men, enquir'd: "Tell me, renown'd Ulysses, pride of Greece, What says he: will he save our ships from fire, Or still, in wrathful mood, withhold his aid?"
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  • To whom again Ulysses, stout of heart: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, His anger is not quench'd, but fiercer still It glows; thy gifts and thee alike he spurns; He bids thee with the other chiefs concert The means thy people and thy ships to save; And menaces himself at early dawn To launch his well-trimm'd vessels on the main.
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  • Outspoke at length the valiant Diomed: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Would that thou ne'er hadst stoop'd with costly gifts To sue for aid from Peleus' matchless son; For he before was over-proud, and now Thine offers will have tenfold swoll'n his pride.
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  • Upon the refusal of Achilles to return to the army, the distress of Agamemnon is described in the most lively manner.
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  • BOOK X. In night-long slumbers lay the other chiefs Of all the Greeks, by gentle sleep subdued; But not on Agamemnon, Atreus' son, By various cares oppress'd, sweet slumber fell.
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  • As when from Jove, the fair-hair'd Juno's Lord, Flashes the lightning, bringing in its train Tempestuous storm of mingled rain and hail Or snow, by winter sprinkled o'er the fields; Or op'ning wide the rav'nous jaws of war; So Agamemnon from his inmost heart Pour'd forth in groans his multitudinous grief, His spirit within him sinking.
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  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "Great need, my noble brother, have we both Of sagest counsels, if we hope the Greeks And Grecian ships from ruin to preserve, Since turn'd against us is the mind of Jove.
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  • Him answer'd Agamemnon, King of men: "Remain thou here, lest haply we might fail To meet; for in the camp are many paths.
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  • To whom thus Agamemnon, King of men: "O Nestor! son of Neleus, pride of Greece, Know me for Agamemnon, Atreus' son, On whom hath Jove, beyond the lot of men, Laid grief that ne'er shall end, while I retain Breath in my lungs, and vigour in my limbs.
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  • To whom thus Agamemnon, King of men: "O Nestor! son of Neleus, pride of Greece, Know me for Agamemnon, Atreus' son, On whom hath Jove, beyond the lot of men, Laid grief that ne'er shall end, while I retain Breath in my lungs, and vigour in my limbs.
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  • To whom Gerenian Nestor thus replied; "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Not all the hopes that Hector entertains Shall by the Lord of counsel be fulfill'd; For him are toil and danger yet in store, If but Achilles of his wrath repent.
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  • To whom thus Agamemnon, King of men: "For other times, old man, reserve thy blame; Sometimes, I own, he lags behind, nor takes His share of labour; not from indolence, Or want of sense; but still regarding me; Waiting from me an impulse to receive.
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  • Rose Agamemnon, King of men, and said: "Tydides, comrade dearest to my soul, Choose thou thine own companion, whom thou wilt; Of all the many here that proffer aid Him whom thou deem'st the best; nor from respect To persons leave the better man behind, And take the worse; nor def'rence show to rank, Not though the purest royal blood were his."
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  • ...of foot; Amid five sisters he the only son; Who thus to Hector and the Trojans spoke: "Hector, with dauntless courage I will dare Approach the ships, and bring thee tidings sure; But hold thou forth thy royal staff, and swear That I the horses and the brass-bound car Shall have, the boast of Peleus' matchless son: Not vain shall be my errand, nor deceive Thy hopes; right through the camp I mean to pass To Agamemnon's tent, where all the chiefs Debate in council, or to fight or fly."
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  • THE THIRD BATTLE, AND THE ACTS OF AGAMEMNON.
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  • Agamemnon, having armed himself, leads the Grecians to battle; Hector prepares the Trojans to receive them; while Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, give the signals of war.
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  • Agamemnon bears all before him; and Hector is commanded by Jupiter (who sends Iris for that purpose) to decline the engagement, till the king should be wounded, and retire from the field.
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  • ...Prepare their food, and wearied with the toil Of felling loftiest trees, with aching arms Turn with keen relish to their midday meal; Then Grecian valour broke th' opposing ranks, As each along the line encourag'd each; First sprang the monarch Agamemnon forth, And brave Bienor slew, his people's guard; And, with the chief, his friend and charioteer, Oileus; he, down-leaping from the car, Stood forth defiant; but between his brows The monarch's spear was thrust; nor aught avail'd The...
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  • The mighty monarch, Agamemnon, drove Through Isus' breast his spear; his weighty sword Descended on the head of Antiphus Beside the ear, and hurl'd him from his car; These of their armour he despoil'd in haste, Known to him both; for he had seen them oft Beside the ships, when thither captive brought From Ida by Achilles, swift of foot.
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  • Soon on the Trojans' flight enforc'd they hung, Destroying; foot on foot, and horse on horse; While from the plain thick clouds of dust arose Beneath the armed hoofs of clatt'ring steeds; And on the monarch Agamemnon press'd, Still slaying, urging still the Greeks to arms.
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  • As when amid a densely timber'd wood Light the devouring flames, by eddying winds Hither and thither borne, fast falls the copse Prostrate beneath the fire's impetuous course; So thickly fell the flying Trojans' heads Beneath the might of Agamemnon's arm; And here and there, athwart the pass of war, Was many an empty car at random whirl'd By strong-neck'd steeds, of guiding hands bereft; Stretch'd on the plain they lay, more welcome sight To carrion birds than to their widow'd wives.
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  • So these the monarch Agamemnon chas'd, Slaying the hindmost; they in terror fled: Some headlong, backward some, Atrides' hand Hurl'd from their chariot many a warrior bold; So forward and so fierce he bore his spear.
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  • ...on the topmost height Of Ida's spring-abounding hill he sat: And while his hand the lightning grasp'd, he thus To golden-winged Iris gave command: "Haste thee, swift Iris, and to Hector bear From me this message; bid him, that as long As Agamemnon in the van appears, Raging, and dealing death among the ranks, He from the battle keep himself aloof, But urge the rest undaunted to maintain The stubborn fight; but should Atrides, struck By spear or arrow, to his car withdraw, He shall...
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  • ...horses and the well-fram'd cars The godlike Hector, Priam's son, she found, And stood beside him, and address'd him thus: "Hector, thou son of Priam, sage as Jove In council, he the Universal Lord Sends thee by me this message; that as long As Agamemnon in the van appears, Raging, and dealing death amid the ranks, Thou from the battle keep thyself aloof, But urge the rest undaunted to maintain The stubborn fight; but should Atrides, struck By spear or arrow, to his car withdraw, Thou...
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  • Loud, at his bidding, rose the battle-cry; Back roll'd the tide; again they fac'd the Greeks: On th' other side the Greeks their masses form'd, In line of battle rang'd; opposed they stood; And in the front, to none content to cede The foremost place, was Agamemnon seen.
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  • Say now, ye Nine, who on Olympus dwell, Of all the Trojans and their fam'd Allies, Who first oppos'd to Agamemnon stood.
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  • ...miss'd his aim, His spear diverging; then Iphidamas Beneath the breastplate, striking on his belt, Strove with strong hand to drive the weapon home: Yet could not pierce the belt's close-plaited work; The point, encounter'd by the silver fold, Was bent, like lead; then with his pow'rful hand The monarch Agamemnon seiz'd the spear, And tow'rd him drew, and with a lion's strength Wrench'd from his foeman's grasp; then on his neck Let fall his sword, and slack'd his limbs in death.
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  • Him Agamemnon of his arms despoil'd, And to the crowd of Greeks the trophies bore.
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  • The valiant son of Tydeus, Diomed, Pierc'd by a shaft; Ulysses by a spear, And Agamemnon's self; Eurypylus By a sharp arrow through the thigh transfix'd; And here another, whom but now I bring, Shot by a bow, from off the battle field: Achilles, valiant as he is, the while For Grecian woes nor care nor pity feels.
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  • Dear friend, remember now th' injunctions giv'n By old Menoetius, when from Phthian land He sent thee forth to Agamemnon's aid: I, and Laertes' godlike son, within, Heard all his counsel; to the well-built house Of Peleus we on embassy had come, Throughout Achaia's fertile lands to raise The means of war; Menoetius there we found, Achilles, and thyself within the house; While in the court-yard aged Peleus slew, And to the Lord of thunder offer'd up A fatten'd steer; and from a golden...
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  • E'en though the mighty monarch, Atreus' son, Wide-ruling Agamemnon, be in truth Wholly to blame in this, that he hath wrong'd The son of Peleus, yet 'tis not for us Our courage to relax.
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  • Nestor, sitting at the table with Machaon, is alarmed with the increasing clamour of the war, and hastens to Agamemnon; on his way he meets that prince with Diomed and Ulysses, whom he informs of the extremity of the danger.
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  • Agamemnon proposes to make their escape by night, which Ulysses withstands; to which Diomed adds his advice, that, wounded as they were, they should go forth and encourage the army with their presence; which advice is pursued.
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  • As heaves the darkling sea with silent swell, Expectant of the boist'rous gale's approach; Nor onward either way is pour'd its flood, Until it feel th' impelling blast from Heav'n; So stood th' old man, his mind perplex'd with doubt, To mingle in the throng, or counsel seek Of mighty Agamemnon, Atreus' son.
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  • There Nestor met, advancing from the ships, The Heav'n-born Kings, Ulysses, Diomed, And Agamemnon, son of Atreus, all By wounds disabled; for the ships were beach'd Upon the shore, beside the hoary sea, Far from the battle; higher, tow'rd the plain The foremost had been drawn, and with a wall Their sterns surrounded; for the spacious beach Could not contain them, and in narrow bounds Were pent their multitudes; so high on land They drew, and rang'd them side by side, and fill'd, Within...
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  • To whom the monarch Agamemnon thus: "O Nestor, son of Neleus, pride of Greece, Why com'st thou here, and leav'st the battle-field?
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  • Whom answer'd Agamemnon, King of men: "Nestor, since to the ships the war is brought, Nor hath the wall avail'd to stay their course, Nor yet the deep-dug trench, on which we Greeks Much toil bestow'd, and which we vainly hop'd Might guard, impregnable, ourselves and ships; Seems it the will of Saturn's mighty son That, far from Argos, from our native land, We all should here in nameless graves be laid.
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  • Whom answer'd Agamemnon, King of men: "Ulysses, thy rebuke hath wrung my soul; Yet never meant I, that against their will The sons of Greece should launch their well found ships: But if there be who better counsel knows, Or young or old, his words would please me well."
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  • He said, and they, his words approving, went, By Agamemnon led, the King of men.
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  • Nor careless was the watch by Neptune kept: With them, in likeness of an aged man, He went, and Agamemnon, Atreus' son, By the right hand he took, and thus address'd: "O son of Atreus, great is now the joy With which Achilles' savage breast is fill'd, Who sees the slaughter and the rout of Greeks: For nought he has of heart, no, not a whit: But perish he, accursed of the Gods!
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  • The Kings themselves, Ulysses, Diomed, And mighty Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Though sorely wounded, yet the troops array'd; Thro'out the ranks they pass'd, and chang'd the arms; The bravest donn'd the best, the worse the worst.
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  • ...noblest of the Greeks, Achilles, be not wroth! such weight of woe The Grecian camp oppresses; in their ships They who were late their bravest and their best, Sore wounded all by spear or arrow lie; The valiant son of Tydeus, Diomed, Pierc'd by a shaft, Ulysses by a spear, And Agamemnon's self; Eurypylus By a sharp arrow through the thigh transfix'd; For these, the large resources of their art The leeches ply, and on their wounds attend; While thou, Achilles, still remain'st unmov'd.
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  • Her, whom the sons of Greece on me bestow'd, Prize of my spear, the well-wall'd city storm'd, The mighty Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Hath borne by force away, as from the hands Of some dishonour'd, houseless vagabond.
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  • ...battle bear, But go, and in my well-known armour clad, Lead forth the valiant Myrmidons to war, Since the dark cloud of Trojans circles round The ships in force; and on the shingly beach, Pent up in narrow limits, lie the Greeks; And all the city hath pour'd its numbers forth In hope undoubting; for they see no more My helm among them flashing; else in flight Their dead would choke the streams, if but to me Great Agamemnon bore a kindly mind: But round the camp the battle now is wag'd.
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  • No more the hands of valiant Diomed, The Greeks protecting, hurl his fiery spear; Nor hear I now, from his detested lips, The shout of Agamemnon; all around Is heard the warrior-slayer Hector's voice, Cheering his Trojans; with triumphant cries They, from the vanquish'd Greeks, hold all the plain.
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  • ...rush In one continuous swarm, to guard their nest: E'en with such courage pour'd the Myrmidons Forth from the ships; then uproar wild arose, And loud Patroclus on his comrades call'd: "Ye valiant Myrmidons, who boast yourselves Achilles' comrades, quit ye now like men; Your ancient valour prove; to Peleus' son, Of all the Greeks the noblest, so shall we, His faithful followers, highest honour give; And Agamemnon's haughty self shall mourn The slight on Grecia's bravest warrior cast."
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  • Accurs'd of Gods and men be hateful strife And anger, which to violence provokes E'en temp'rate souls: though sweeter be its taste Than dropping honey, in the heart of man Swelling, like smoke; such anger in my soul Hath Agamemnon kindled, King of men.
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  • E'en while he lives, and sees the light of day, He lives in sorrow; nor, to soothe his grief, My presence can avail; a girl, his prize, Selected for him by the sons of Greece, Great Agamemnon wrested from his arms: In grief and rage he pin'd his soul away; Then by the Trojans were the Greeks hemm'd in Beside their ships, and from within their camp No outlet found; the Grecian Elders then Implor'd his aid, and promis'd costly gifts.
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  • ARGUMENT THE RECONCILIATION OF ACHILLES AND AGAMEMNON.
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  • Agamemnon and Achilles are solemnly reconciled: the speeches, presents, and ceremonies on that occasion.
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  • Whom answer'd thus the silver-footed Queen: "Let not such fears, my son, disturb thy mind: I will myself the swarms of flies disperse, That on the flesh of slaughter'd warriors prey: And should he here remain a year complete, Still should his flesh be firm and fresh as now: But thou to council call the chiefs of Greece; Against the monarch Agamemnon there, The leader of the host, abjure thy wrath; Then arm thee quickly, and put on thy might."
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  • Next follow'd Agamemnon, King of men, He also wounded; for Antenor's son, Coon, had stabb'd him in the stubborn fight.
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  • He said: the well-greav'd Greeks rejoic'd to hear His wrath abjur'd by Peleus' godlike son; And from his seat, not standing in the midst, Thus to th' assembly Agamemnon spoke: "Friends, Grecian Heroes, Ministers of Mars, When one stands up to speak, 'tis meet for all To lend a patient ear, nor interrupt; For e'en to practis'd speakers hard the task: But, in this vast assembly, who can speak That all may hear? the clearest voice must fail.
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  • Whom answer'd thus Achilles swift of foot: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, The gifts thou deem'st befitting, 'tis for thee To give, or to withhold; but now at once Prepare we for the battle; 'tis not meet On trivial pretexts here to waste our time, Or idly loiter; much remains to do: Again be seen Achilles in the van, Scatt'ring with brazen spear the Trojan ranks; And ye, forget not man with man to fight."
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  • Disperse then now the crowd, and bid prepare The morning meal; meantime to public view Let Agamemnon, King of men, display His costly gifts; that all the Greeks may see, And that thy heart within thee melt with joy: And there in full assembly let him swear A solemn oath, that he hath ne'er approach'd The fair Briseis' bed, nor held with her Such intercourse as man with woman holds.
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  • To whom thus Agamemnon, King of men: "Son of Laertes, I accept thy speech With cordial welcome: all that thou hast said Is well and wisely spoken; for the oath, I am prepar'd, with willing mind, to swear; Nor in the sight of Heav'n will be forsworn.
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  • Whom answer'd thus Achilles swift of foot: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, These matters to some future time were best Deferr'd, some hour of respite from the fight, Of rage less fiercely burning in my breast; But slaughter'd now they lie, whom Priam's son, Hector, hath slain, by Jove to vict'ry led.
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  • He said, and call'd on noble Nestor's sons, On Meges, Phyleus' son, Meriones, Thoas, and Lycomedes, Creon's son, And Melanippus; they together sought The mighty monarch Agamemnon's tent.
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  • Ulysses led the way, and with him brought Ten talents full of gold; th' attendant youths The other presents bore, and in the midst Display'd before th' assembly: then uprose The monarch Agamemnon; by his side, With voice of godlike pow'r, Talthybius stood, Holding the victim: then Atrides drew The dagger, ever hanging at his side, Close by the scabbard of his mighty sword, And from the victim's head the bristles shore.
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  • To Agamemnon then the Kings of Greece The royal son of Peleus, swift of foot, Conducted; yet with him they scarce prevail'd; So fierce his anger for his comrade's death.
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  • But when to Agamemnon's tent they came, He to the clear-voic'd heralds gave command An ample tripod on the fire to place; If haply Peleus' son he might persuade To wash away the bloody stains of war: But sternly he, and with an oath refus'd.
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  • Observe we now the mournful fun'ral feast; But thou, great Agamemnon, King of men, Send forth at early dawn, and to the camp Bring store of fuel, and all else prepare, That with provision meet the dead may pass Down to the realms of night; so shall the fire From out our sight consume our mighty dead, And to their wonted tasks the troops return."
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  • He said; his words the gen'ral grief arous'd: To them, as round the piteous dead they mourn'd, Appear'd the rosy-finger'd morn; and straight, From all the camp, by Agamemnon sent, Went forth, in search of fuel, men and mules, Led by a valiant chief, Meriones, The follower of renown'd Idomeneus.
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  • He said, and on his comrade's hand he laid The locks; his act the gen'ral grief arous'd; And now the setting sun had found them still Indulging o'er the dead; but Peleus' son Approaching, thus to Agamemnon spoke: "Atrides, for to thee the people pay Readiest obedience, mourning too prolong'd May weary; thou then from the pyre the rest Disperse, and bid prepare the morning meal; Ours be the farther charge, to whom the dead Was chiefly dear; yet let the chiefs remain."
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  • The monarch Agamemnon heard, and straight Dispers'd the crowd amid their sev'ral ships.
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  • ...charioteer; Next, Tydeus' son, the valiant Diomed, With Trojan horses, from AEneas won, When by Apollo's aid himself escap'd; Then Heav'n-born Menelaus, Atreus' son, Two flying coursers harness'd to his car; His own, Podargus, had for yokefellow AEthe, a mare by Agamemnon lent: Her, Echepolus to Atrides gave, Anchises' son, that to the wars of Troy He might not be compell'd, but safe at home Enjoy his ease; for Jove had bless'd his store With ample wealth, in Sicyon's wide domain.
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  • To whom in anger thus the Cretan chief: "Ajax, at wrangling good, in judgment naught, And for aught else, among the chiefs of Greece Of small account—so stubborn is thy soul; Wilt thou a tripod or a caldron stake, And Agamemnon, Atreus' son, appoint The umpire to decide whose steeds are first?
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  • ...A horse, when harness'd to a royal car; Whose tail, back-streaming, with the utmost hairs Brushes the felloes; close before the wheel, Small space between, he scours the wide-spread plain: So far was Menelaus in the rear Of Nestor's son; at first, a discus' cast Between them lay; but rapidly his ground He gain'd—so well the speed and courage serv'd Of AEthe, Agamemnon's beauteous mare; And, but a little farther were the course, Had pass'd him by, nor left the race in doubt.
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  • Uprose then Agamemnon, King of men, The son of Atreus, and Meriones, The faithful follower of Idomeneus: But Peleus' godlike son address'd them thus: "How far, Atrides, thou excell'st us all, And with the jav'lin what thy pow'r and skill Pre-eminent, we know; take thou this prize, And bear it to thy ships; and let us give To brave Meriones the brazen spear; If so it please thee, such were my advice."
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  • He said; and Agamemnon, King of men, Assenting, gave to brave Meriones The brazen spear; while in Talthybius' care, His herald, plac'd the King his noble prize.
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  • We gaz'd in wonder; from the fight restrain'd By Peleus' son, with Agamemnon wroth.
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  • Then thus Achilles spoke in jesting tone: "Thou needs must sleep without, my good old friend; Lest any leader of the Greeks should come, As is their custom, to confer with me; Of them whoe'er should find thee here by night Forthwith to Agamemnon would report, And Hector might not be so soon, restor'd.
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  • Thy son hath been restor'd, and thou hast paid A gen'rous price; but to redeem thy life, If Agamemnon and the other Greeks Should know that thou art here, full thrice so much Thy sons, who yet are left, would have to pay."
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  • FOOTNOTES [1] The text of the original leaves it somewhat in doubt whether the anger of the Greeks were directed against Thersites or Agamemnon.
    Footnotes (3% in)
  • _ Thersites was an object of general contempt, but he had done nothing to excite those feelings: indeed, apart from the offensiveness of his tone, the public sympathy was with him; for the army was deeply dissatisfied, and resented the conduct of Agamemnon against Achilles, mainly perhaps because they had ceased to be enriched with the plunder of his successful forays (see i. 202, and ix.
    Footnotes (16% in)
  • 126), and by Agamemnon himself (xiv.
    Footnotes (21% in)
  • They had lately manifested themselves in the alacrity with which the whole army had caught at the insidious suggestion of abandoning the war; and, just before the second assembly, Thersites avails himself of the general feeling, constituting himself the representative of a popular grievance, to vent his personal spite against Agamemnon.
    Footnotes (28% in)
  • Thereupon the fickle multitude, "despite their anger" (against Agamemnon), cannot refrain from laughing at the signal discomfiture of their self-constituted champion.
    Footnotes (37% in)

There are no more uses of "Agamemnon" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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