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immortal
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

106 uses
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Definition
living or existing forever

or:

someone famous throughout history

or:

someone who will never die — such as a mythological god
  • But when the twelfth revolving day was come, Back to Olympus' heights th' immortal Gods, Jove at their head, together all return'd.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (79% in)
  • He said: and on the silver hilt he stay'd His pow'rful hand, and flung his mighty sword Back to its scabbard, to Minerva's word Obedient: she her heav'nward course pursued To join th' Immortals in th' abode of Jove.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (38% in)
  • For I remember, in my father's house, I oft have heard thee boast, how thou, alone Of all th' Immortals, Saturn's cloud-girt son Didst shield from foul disgrace, when all the rest, Juno, and Neptune, and Minerva join'd, With chains to bind him; then, O Goddess, thou Didst set him free, invoking to his aid Him of the hundred arms, whom Briareus Th' immortal Gods, and men AEgeon call.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (64% in)
  • For I remember, in my father's house, I oft have heard thee boast, how thou, alone Of all th' Immortals, Saturn's cloud-girt son Didst shield from foul disgrace, when all the rest, Juno, and Neptune, and Minerva join'd, With chains to bind him; then, O Goddess, thou Didst set him free, invoking to his aid Him of the hundred arms, whom Briareus Th' immortal Gods, and men AEgeon call.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (64% in)
  • Th' all-seeing son of Saturn there she found Sitting apart upon the topmost crest Of many-ridg'd Olympus; at his feet She sat, and while her left hand clasp'd his knees, Her right approached his beard, and suppliant thus She made her pray'r to Saturn's royal son: "Father, if e'er amid th' immortal Gods By word or deed I did thee service true, Hear now my pray'r!
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (80% in)
  • She said: the Cloud-compeller answer'd not, But silent sat; then Thetis clasp'd his knees, And hung about him, and her suit renew'd: "Give me thy promise sure, thy gracious nod, Or else refuse (for thou hast none to fear), That I may learn, of all th' immortal Gods, How far I stand the lowest in thine eyes."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (82% in)
  • Lo, to confirm thy faith, I nod my head; And well among th' immortal Gods is known The solemn import of that pledge from me: For ne'er my promise shall deceive, or fail, Or be recall'd, if with a nod confirm'd."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (83% in)
  • He said, and nodded with his shadowy brows; Wav'd on th' immortal head th' ambrosial locks, And all Olympus trembled at his nod.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (84% in)
  • But now, keep silence, and my words obey, Lest all th' Immortals fail, if I be wroth, To rescue thee from my resistless hand."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (89% in)
  • Thus as he spoke, the white-armed Goddess smil'd, And, smiling, from, his hand receiv'd the cup, Then to th' Immortals all, in order due, He minister'd, and from the flagon pour'd The luscious nectar; while among the Gods Rose laughter irrepressible, at sight Of Vulcan hobbling round the spacious hall.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (94% in)
  • Bid that he arm in haste the long-hair'd Greeks To combat; for the wide-built streets of Troy He now may capture; since th' immortal Gods Watch over her no longer; all are gain'd By Juno's pray'rs; and woes impend o'er Troy."
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (1% in)
  • He bids thee arm in haste the long-hair'd Greeks To combat; since the wide-built streets of Troy Thou now mayst capture; for th' immortal Gods Watch over her no longer; all are gain'd By Juno's pray'rs; and woes impend o'er Troy.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (3% in)
  • Aurora now was rising up the steep Of great Olympus, to th' immortal Gods Pure light diffusing; when Atrides bade The clear-voic'd heralds to th' Assembly call The gen'ral host; they gave the word, and straight From ev'ry quarter throng'd the eager crowd.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (6% in)
  • He bids thee arm in haste the long-hair'd Greeks To combat: since the wide-built streets of Troy Thou now may'st capture; for th' immortal Gods Watch over her no longer: all are gain'd By Juno's pray'rs, and woes impend o'er Troy.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (8% in)
  • Uprising then, and through the camp dispers'd They took their sev'ral ways, and by their tents The fires they lighted, and the meal prepar'd; And each to some one of the Immortal Gods His off'ring made, that in the coming fight He might escape the bitter doom of death.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (45% in)
  • The Heav'n-born Kings, encircling Atreus' son, The troops inspected: Pallas, blue-ey'd Maid, Before the chiefs her glorious aegis bore, By time untouch'd, immortal: all around A hundred tassels hung, rare works of art, All gold, each one a hundred oxen's price.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (51% in)
  • Anchises' valiant son, AEneas, led The Dardans; him, 'mid Ida's jutting peaks, Immortal Venus to Anchises bore, A Goddess yielding to a mortal's love: With him, well skill'd in war, Archilochus And Acamas, Antenor's gallant sons.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (91% in)
  • To Ilium's breezy heights I now withdraw, For that mine eyes will not endure the sight Of warlike Menelaus and my son Engag'd in deadly combat; of the two Which may be doom'd to death, is only known To Jove, and to th' immortal pow'rs of Heav'n."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (65% in)
  • Yet should my labours not be fruitless all; For I too am a God; my blood is thine; Worthy of honour, as the eldest born Of deep-designing Saturn, and thy wife; Thine, who o'er all th' Immortals reign'st supreme.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (11% in)
  • If then some God make trial of thy force, With other of th' Immortals fight thou not; But should Jove's daughter Venus dare the fray Thou needst not shun at her to cast thy spear."
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (15% in)
  • AEneas, great Anchises' son, Who from immortal Venus boasts his birth.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (27% in)
  • Forth from the wound th' immortal current flow'd, Pure ichor, life-stream of the blessed Gods; They eat no bread, they drink no ruddy wine, And bloodless thence and deathless they become.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (37% in)
  • Thrice was his onset made, with murd'rous aim; And thrice Apollo struck his glitt'ring shield; But when, with godlike force, he sought to make His fourth attempt, the Far-destroyer spoke In terms of awful menace: "Be advis'd, Tydides, and retire; nor as a God Esteem thyself; since not alike the race Of Gods immortal and of earth-born men."
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (48% in)
  • Offspring of Saturn, Juno, heav'nly Queen, Herself th' immortal steeds caparison'd, Adorn'd with golden frontlets: to the car Hebe the circling wheels of brass attach'd, Eight-spok'd, that on an iron axle turn'd; The felloes were of gold, and fitted round With brazen tires, a marvel to behold; The naves were silver, rounded every way: The chariot-board on gold and silver bands Was hung, and round it ran a double rail: The pole was all of silver; at the end A golden yoke, with golden...
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (78% in)
  • Nor heartless fear, nor hesitating doubt, Restrain me; but I bear thy words in mind, With other of th' Immortals not to fight: But should Jove's daughter, Venus, dare the fray, At her I need not shun to throw my spear.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (89% in)
  • With speed he came to great Olympus' heights, Th' abode of Gods; and sitting by the throne Of Saturn's son, with anguish torn, he show'd Th' immortal stream that trickled from the wound, And thus to Jove his piteous words address'd: "O Father Jove, canst thou behold unmov'd These acts of violence? the greatest ills We Gods endure, we each to other owe Who still in human quarrels interpose.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (94% in)
  • The other Gods, who on Olympus dwell, Are all to thee obedient and submiss; But thy pernicious daughter, nor by word Nor deed dost thou restrain; who now excites Th' o'erbearing son of Tydeus, Diomed, Upon th' immortal Gods to vent his rage.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (95% in)
  • Not long did Dryas' son, Lycurgus brave, Survive, who dar'd th' Immortals to defy: He, 'mid their frantic orgies, in the groves Of lovely Nyssa, put to shameful rout The youthful Bacchus' nurses; they, in fear, Dropp'd each her thyrsus, scatter'd by the hand Of fierce Lycurgus, with an ox-goad arm'd.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (23% in)
  • Bacchus himself beneath the ocean wave In terror plung'd, and, trembling, refuge found In Thetis' bosom from a mortal's threats: The Gods indignant saw, and Saturn's son Smote him with blindness; nor surviv'd he long, Hated alike by all th' immortal Gods.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (25% in)
  • But tarry till I bring the luscious wine, That first to Jove, and to th' Immortals all, Thou mayst thine off'ring pour; then with the draught Thyself thou mayst refresh; for great the strength Which gen'rous wine imparts to men who toil, As thou hast toil'd, thy comrades to protect."
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (46% in)
  • Laugh'd the fond parents both, and from his brow Hector the casque remov'd, and set it down, All glitt'ring, on the ground; then kiss'd his child, And danc'd him in his arms; then thus to Jove And to th' Immortals all address'd his pray'r: "Grant, Jove, and all ye Gods, that this my son May be, as I, the foremost man of Troy, For valour fam'd, his country's guardian King; That men may say, 'This youth surpasses far His father,' when they see him from the fight, From slaughter'd foes,...
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (85% in)
  • I will myself confront him; for success, Th' immortal Gods above the issues hold."
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (20% in)
  • Most great! most glorious! grant that Ajax now May gain the vict'ry, and immortal praise: Or if thy love and pity Hector claim, Give equal pow'r and equal praise to both."
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (40% in)
  • Thus labour'd thro' the night the long-hair'd Greeks: The Gods, assembled in the courts of Jove, With wonder view'd the mighty work; and thus Neptune, Earth-shaking King, his speech began: "O Father Jove, in all the wide-spread earth Shall men be found, in counsel and design To rival us Immortals? see'st thou not How round their ships the long-hair'd Greeks have built A lofty wall, and dug a trench around, Nor to the Gods have paid their off'rings due!
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (87% in)
  • The horses from the car the Hours unyok'd, And safely tether'd in the heav'nly stalls; The car they rear'd against the inner wall, That brightly polish'd shone; the Goddesses Themselves meanwhile, amid th' Immortals all, With, sorrowing hearts on golden seats reclin'd.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (74% in)
  • But this I say, and bear it in your minds, Had I my lightning launch'd, and from your car Had hurl'd ye down, ye ne'er had reach'd again Olympus' height, th' immortal Gods' abode."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (78% in)
  • ...Which I maintain, and ever have maintain'd, Ev'n from the day when thou, great King, didst bear The fair Briseis from Achilles' tent Despite his anger—not by my advice: I fain would have dissuaded thee, but thou, Following the dictates of thy wrathful pride, Didst to our bravest wrong, dishon'ring him Whom ev'n th' Immortals honour'd; for his prize Thou took'st and still retain'st; but let us now Consider, if ev'n yet, with costly gifts And soothing words, we may his wrath appease."
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (15% in)
  • Pray'rs are the daughters of immortal Jove; But halt, and wrinkled, and of feeble sight, They plod in Ate's track; while Ate, strong And swift of foot, outstrips their laggard pace, And, dealing woe to man, o'er all the earth Before them flies: they, following, heal her wounds.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (69% in)
  • Then to the daughters of immortal Jove, Do thou, Achilles, show the like respect, That many another brave man's heart hath sway'd.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (70% in)
  • With gold and silver is his chariot wrought, His armour golden, of gigantic size, A marvel to behold! it seems not meet For mortal man, but for th' immortal Gods.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (72% in)
  • The cap of marten fur from off his head They took, the wolf-skin, and the bow unstrung, And jav'lin; these Ulysses held aloft, And thus to Pallas pray'd, who gave the spoil: "Receive, great Goddess, these our gifts; to thee, Of all th' Immortals on Olympus' height, Our off'rings first we give; conduct us now, The Thracian camp and Thracian steeds to gain."
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (75% in)
  • Now rose Aurora from Tithonus' bed, To mortals and Immortals bringing light; When to the ships of Greece came Discord down, Despatch'd from Jove, with dire portents of war.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (0% in)
  • Put we our trust in Jove's eternal will, Of mortals and Immortals King supreme.
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (50% in)
  • Then down the mountain's craggy side he pass'd With rapid step; and as he mov'd along, Beneath th' immortal feet of Ocean's Lord Quak'd the huge mountain and the shadowy wood.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (5% in)
  • Nor knew the loud-voic'd, mighty God of War That in the stubborn fight his son had fall'n; On high Olympus, girt with golden clouds, He sat, amid th' Immortals all, restrain'd, By Jove's commands, from mingling in the war.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (61% in)
  • He there remain'd; my father, wand'ring long, To Argos came; such was the will of Jove And of th' Immortals all; he there espous'd Adrastus' daughter; own'd a wealthy house, With fertile corn-lands round, and orchards stor'd With goodly fruit-trees; num'rous flocks he had, And all the Greeks in feats of arms excell'd.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (22% in)
  • There enter'd she, and clos'd the shining doors; And with ambrosia first her lovely skin She purified, with fragrant oil anointing, Ambrosial, breathing forth such odours sweet, That, wav'd above the brazen floor of Jove, All earth and Heav'n were with the fragrance fill'd; O'er her fair skin this precious oil she spread; Comb'd out her flowing locks, and with her hand Wreath'd the thick masses of the glossy hair, Immortal, bright, that crown'd th' imperial head.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (32% in)
  • Rich guerdon shall be thine; a gorgeous throne, Immortal, golden; which my skilful son, Vulcan, shall deftly frame; beneath, a stool Whereon at feasts thy feet may softly rest.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (43% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus the gentle God of Sleep: "Daughter of Saturn, Juno, mighty Queen, On any other of th' immortal Gods I can with ease exert my slumb'rous pow'r; Even to the stream of old Oceanus, Prime origin of all; but Saturn's son, Imperial Jove, I dare not so approach, Nor sink in sleep, save by his own desire.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (44% in)
  • How if some other of th' immortal Gods Should find us sleeping, and 'mid all the Gods Should spread the tale abroad?
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (61% in)
  • There on the topmost height of Gargarus, By sleep and love subdued, th' immortal Sire, Clasp'd in his arms his wife, repos'd in peace.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (64% in)
  • But when the ford was reach'd of Xanthus' stream, Broad-flowing, eddying, by immortal Jove Begotten, on the ground they laid him down, And dash'd the cooling water on his brow: Reviv'd, he lifted up awhile his eyes; Then on his knees half rising, he disgorg'd The clotted blood; but backward to the earth, Still by the blow subdu'd, again he fell, And darkling shades of night his eyes o'erspread.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (80% in)
  • Yet will not I my anger intermit, Nor suffer other of th' immortal Gods To aid the Greeks, till Peleus' son behold His wish accomplish'd, and the boon obtain'd I promis'd once, and with a nod confirm'd, That day when sea-born Thetis clasp'd my knees, And pray'd me to avenge her warrior son."
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (9% in)
  • To whom the white-arm'd Goddess, Juno, thus: "Forbear thy questions, Themis; well thou know'st How haughty and imperious is his mind; Thou for the Gods in haste prepare the feast; Then shalt thou learn, amid th' Immortals all, What evil he designs; nor all, I ween, His counsels will approve, or men, or Gods, Though now in blissful ignorance they feast."
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (13% in)
  • ...said, and sat; the Gods, oppress'd with care, Her farther speech awaited; on her lips There dwelt indeed a smile, but not a ray Pass'd o'er her dark'ning brow, as thus her wrath Amid th' assembled Gods found vent in words: "Fools are we all, who madly strive with Jove, Or hope, by access to his throne, to sway, By word or deed, his course; from all apart, He all our counsels heeds not, but derides; And boasts o'er all th' immortal Gods to reign In unapproach'd pre-eminence of pow'r.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (14% in)
  • Then from the throne of Jove had heavier wrath And deeper vengeance on th' Immortals fall'n, But Pallas, in alarm for all the Gods, Quitting in haste the throne whereon she sat, Sprang past the vestibule, and from his head The helmet lifted, from his arm the shield; Took from his sturdy hand, and rear'd upright, The brazen spear; then with reproachful words She thus assail'd th' impetuous God of War; "Frantic, and passion-maddened, thou art lost!
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (16% in)
  • To whom Earth-shaking Neptune thus replied: "Immortal Iris, weighty are thy words, And in good season spoken; and 'tis well When envoys are by sound discretion led.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (27% in)
  • ...from me, In combat with the warlike sons of Troy; (So should my name in less repute be held;) Nor, in the keen excitement of the fight And slaughter of the Trojans, lead thy troops On tow'rd the city, lest thou find thyself By some one of th' immortal Gods oppos'd; For the far-darting Phoebus loves them well; But when in safety thou hast plac'd the ships, Delay not to return, and leave the rest To battle on the plain: for would to Jove, To Pallas and Apollo, that not one, Or Greek or...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (11% in)
  • The flying steeds he harness'd to the car, Xanthus and Balius, fleeter than the winds; Whom, grazing in the marsh by ocean's stream, Podarge, swift of foot, to Zephyr bore: And by their side the matchless Pedasus, Whom from the capture of Eetion's town Achilles bore away; a mortal horse, But with immortal coursers meet to vie.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (17% in)
  • Flew o'er the deep-sunk trench th' immortal steeds, The noble prize the Gods to Peleus gave, Still onward straining; for he long'd to reach, And hurl his spear at Hector; him meanwhile His flying steeds in safety bore away.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (43% in)
  • To Phoebus then the Cloud-compeller thus: "Hie thee, good Phoebus, from amid the spears Withdraw Sarpedon, and from all his wounds Cleanse the dark gore; then bear him far away, And lave his body in the flowing stream; Then with divine ambrosia all his limbs Anointing, clothe him in immortal robes.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (75% in)
  • He said; obedient to his father's words, Down to the battle-field Apollo sped From Ida's height; and from amid the spears Withdrawn, he bore Sarpedon far away, And lav'd his body in the flowing stream; Then with divine ambrosia all his limbs Anointing, cloth'd him in immortal robes; To two swift bearers gave him then in charge, To Sleep and Death, twin brothers; in their arms They bore him safe to Lycia's wide-spread plains.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (77% in)
  • Then had the Greeks the lofty-gated town Of Priam captur'd by Patroclus' hand, So forward and so fierce he bore his spear; But on the well-built tow'r Apollo stood, On his destruction bent, and Troy's defence The jutting angle of the lofty wall Patroclus thrice assail'd; his onset thrice Apollo, with his own immortal hands Repelling, backward thrust his glitt'ring shield.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (79% in)
  • He said, and planting firm his foot, withdrew The brazen spear, and backward drove the dead From off the weapon's point; then, spear in hand, Intent to slay, Automedon pursued, The godlike follower of AEacides: But him in safety bore th' immortal steeds, The noble prize the Gods to Peleus gave.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (98% in)
  • So saying, Hector of the glancing helm, Withdrawing from the field, with rapid steps His comrades follow'd, and ere long o'ertook, Who tow'rd the town Achilles' armour bore; Then standing from the bloody fight aloof The armour he exchang'd; his own he bade The warlike Trojans to the city bear; While he, of Peleus' son, Achilles, donn'd The heav'nly armour, which th' immortal Gods Gave to his sire; he to his son convey'd; Yet in that armour grew not old that son.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (25% in)
  • Thou of the prime of men, The dread of all, hast donn'd th' immortal arms, Whose comrade, brave and good, thy hand hath slain; And sham'd him, stripping from his head and breast Helmet and cuirass; yet thy latest hours Will I with glory crown; since ne'er from thee, Eeturn'd from battle, shall Andromache Receive the spoils of Peleus' godlike son."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (25% in)
  • To whom Automedon, Diores' son: "Alcimedon, since none of all the Greeks May vie with thee, the mettle to control Of these immortal horses, save indeed, While yet he liv'd, Patroclus, godlike chief; But him stern death and fate have overta'en; Take thon the whip and shining reins, while I, Descending from the car, engage in fight."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (60% in)
  • In search of Hector now, of him who slew My friend, I go; prepar'd to meet my death, When Jove shall will it, and th' Immortals all.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (17% in)
  • I too, since such my doom, must lie in death; Yet, ere I die, immortal fame will win; And from their delicate cheeks, deep-bosom'd dames, Dardan and Trojan, bitter tears shall wipe, And groan in anguish; then shall all men know How long I have been absent from the field; Then, though thou love me, seek not from the war To stay my steps; for bootless were thy speech."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (18% in)
  • And now the body had he borne away, With endless fame; but from Olympus' height Came storm-swift Iris down to Peleus' son, And bade him don his arms; by Juno sent, Unknown to Jove, and to th' Immortals all.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (25% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus Achilles, swift of foot: "Say, heav'nly Iris, of th' immortal Gods Who bade thee seek me, and this message bring?"
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (27% in)
  • But if indeed Achilles by the ships Hath reappear'd, himself, if so he choose, Shall be the suff'rer; from the perilous strife I will not shrink, but his encounter meet: So he, or I, shall gain immortal fame; Impartial Mars hath oft the slayer slain."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (47% in)
  • Such, converse while they held, to Vulcan's house, Immortal, starlike bright, among the Gods Unrivall'd, all of brass, by Vulcan's self Constructed, sped the silver-footed Queen.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (56% in)
  • But when th' Immortals mingled in the throng, Then furious wax'd the spirit-stirring strife; Then Pallas rais'd her war-cry, standing now Beside the deep-dug trench, without the wall, Now shouting loud along the sounding beach.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (9% in)
  • Thus, either side exciting to the fray, Th' immortal Gods unchain'd the angry war.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (11% in)
  • Pluto, th' infernal monarch, heard alarm'd, And, springing from his throne, cried out in fear, Lest Neptune, breaking through the solid earth, To mortals and Immortals should lay bare His dark and drear abode, of Gods abhorr'd.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (12% in)
  • To whom the King Apollo, son of Jove: "Brave chief, do thou too to th' immortal Gods Address thy pray'r; men say that thou art sprung From Venus, child of Jove; his mother owns A humbler origin; one born to Jove, The other to the aged Ocean God.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (20% in)
  • Say, then, shall we, encount'ring, to retreat Perforce constrain him? or shall one of us Beside Achilles stand, and give him strength That he may nothing lack; and know himself By all the mightiest of th' immortal Gods Belov'd, and those how pow'rless, by whose aid The Trojans yet maintain defensive war?
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (23% in)
  • ...of th' hoary sea Again, to Erichthonius Tros was born, The King of Troy; three noble sons were his, Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede; The fairest he of all the sons of men; Him, for his beauty, bore the Gods away, To minister as cup-bearer to Jove, And dwell amid th' Immortals: Ilus next Begot a noble son, Laomedon; Tithonus he, and Priam; Clytius, Lampus and Icetaon, plant of Mars; Capys, begotten of Assaracus, Begot Anchises, and Anchises me: To Priam godlike Hector owes his birth.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (45% in)
  • Then had AEneas, with the massive stone, Or on the helmet, or the shield, his death Averting, struck Achilles; and himself Had by the sword of Peleus' son been slain, Had not th' Earth-shaking God his peril seen, And to th' Immortals thus address'd his speech: "Oh, woe is me for great AEneas' sake, Who, by Achilles slain, must visit soon The viewless shades; insensate, who relied On Phoebus' words; yet nought shall he avail From death to save him.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (55% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus the stag-ey'd Queen of Heav'n: "Neptune, do thou determine for thyself AEneas to withdraw, or leave to fall, Good as he is, beneath Achilles' sword; But we before th' immortal Gods are bound, Both I and Pallas, by repeated oaths, Ne'er from his doom one Trojan life to save, Though to devouring flames a prey, all Troy Were blazing, kindled by the valiant Greeks."
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (59% in)
  • Then is AEneas of th' immortal Gods In truth belov'd, though vain I deem'd his boast.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (64% in)
  • 'Twere hard for me, brave warrior though I be, To face such numbers, and to fight with all: Not Mars, nor Pallas, though immortal Gods, Could face, and vanquish, such a mighty mass.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (67% in)
  • But when they came to eddying Xanthus' ford, Fair-flowing stream, born of immortal Jove, Achilles cut in twain the flying host; Part driving tow'rd the city, o'er the plain, Where on the former day the routed Greeks, When Hector rag'd victorious, fled amain.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (0% in)
  • This when the white-arm'd Goddess Juno heard, To Vulcan straight she thus address'd her speech: "Vulcan, my glorious son, restrain thy hand: In mortal men's behalf, it is not meet To press thus hardly an Immortal God."
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (60% in)
  • Hast thou forgotten all the cruel wrongs We two, alone of all th' Immortals, bore, When here, in Ilium, for a year, we serv'd, By Jove's command, the proud Laomedon, For promis'd hire; and he our tasks assign'd?
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (70% in)
  • Ne'er in our father's halls again, as erst Among th' Immortals, let me hear thee boast How thou with Neptune wouldst in arms contend."
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (75% in)
  • Freely amid th' Immortals make thy boast, That by thy prowess thou hast vanquish'd me."
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (78% in)
  • Within the walls escaping, dried their sweat, And drank, and quench'd their thirst, reclining safe On the fair battlements; but nearer drew, With slanted shields, the Greeks; yet Hector still In front of Ilium and the Scaean gate, Stay'd by his evil doom, remain'd without; Then Phoebus thus to Peleus' godlike son: "Achilles, why with active feet pursue, Thou mortal, me Immortal? know'st thou not My Godhead, that so hot thy fury burns?
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (2% in)
  • Me of immortal honour thou hast robb'd, And them, thyself from vengeance safe, hast sav'd.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (3% in)
  • Accurs'd be he! would that th' immortal Gods So favour'd him as I! then should his corpse Soon to the vultures and the dogs be giv'n!
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (8% in)
  • Then enter now, my son, the city gates, And of the women and the men of Troy, Be still the guardian; nor to Peleus' son, With thine own life, immortal glory give.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (11% in)
  • But let us first th' immortal Gods invoke; The surest witnesses and guardians they Of compacts: at my hand no foul disgrace Shalt thou sustain, if Jove with victory Shall crown my firm endurance, and thy life To me be forfeit; of thine armour stripp'd I promise thee, Achilles, to the Greeks Thy body to restore; do thou the like."
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (47% in)
  • To him, though dead, Achilles thus replied: "Die thou! my fate I then shall meet, whene'er Jove and th' immortal Gods shall so decree."
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (68% in)
  • They saw, and rising all, besought her each To sit beside him; she with their requests Refus'd compliance, and address'd them thus: "No seat for me; for I o'er th' ocean stream From hence am bound to AEthiopia's shore, To share the sacred feast, and hecatombs, Which there they offer to th' immortal Gods; But, Boreas, thee, and loud-voic'd Zephyrus, With vows of sacrifice, Achilles calls To fan the fun'ral pyre, whereon is laid Patroclus, mourn'd by all the host of Greece."
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (23% in)
  • Then, standing up, he thus address'd the Greeks: "Thou son of Atreus, and ye well-greav'd Greeks, Before ye are the prizes, which await The contest of the cars; but if, ye Greeks, For any other cause these games were held, I to my tent should bear the foremost prize; For well ye know how far my steeds excel, Steeds of immortal race, which Neptune gave To Peleus, he to me, his son, transferr'd.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (30% in)
  • Thus he; they all assented to his words; And, by the gen'ral voice of Greece, the mare Had now been his; but noble Nestor's son, Antilochus, stood up, his right to claim, And to Achilles, Peleus' son, replied: "Achilles, thou wilt do me grievous wrong, If thou thy words accomplish; for my prize Thou tak'st away, because mishap befell His car and horses, by no fault of his; Yet had he to th' Immortals made his pray'r, He surely had not thus been last of all.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (59% in)
  • Antilochus the sole remaining prize Receiv'd, and, laughing, thus the Greeks address'd: "I tell you, friends, but what yourselves do know, How of the elder men th' immortal Gods Take special care; for Ajax' years not much Exceed mine own; but here we see a man, One of a former age, and race of men; A hale old man we call him; but for speed Not one can match him, save Achilles' self."
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (86% in)
  • A mortal one, and nurs'd at woman's breast; The other, of a Goddess born, whom I Nurtur'd and rear'd, and to a mortal gave In marriage; gave to Peleus, best belov'd By all th' Immortals, of the race of man.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (8% in)
  • Swift-footed Iris at her side appear'd, And thus address'd her: "Hasten, Thetis; Jove, Lord of immortal counsel, summons thee."
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (12% in)
  • Th' all-seeing son of Saturn there they found, And rang'd around him all th' immortal Gods.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (13% in)
  • He said; th' old man rejoicing heard his words, And answer'd, "See, my son, how good it is To give th' immortal Gods their tribute due; For never did my son, while yet he liv'd, Neglect the Gods who on Olympus dwell; And thence have they remember'd him in death.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (53% in)
  • Thus from his birth the Gods to Peleus gave Excellent gifts; with wealth and substance bless'd Above his fellows; o'er the Myrmidons He rul'd with sov'reign sway; and Heav'n bestow'd On him, a mortal, an immortal bride.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (67% in)
  • At length th' immortal Gods entomb'd the dead.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (76% in)
  • But when they came to eddying Xanthus' ford, Fair-flowing stream, born of immortal Jove, To high Olympus Hermes took his flight, As morn, in saffron robe, o'er all the earth Was light diffusing; they with fun'ral wail Drove cityward the horses; following came The mules that drew the litter of the dead.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (86% in)
  • Dear to th' Immortals too in life wast thou, And they in death have borne thee still in mind; For other of my sons, his captives made, Across the wat'ry waste, to Samos' isle Or Imbros, or th' inhospitable shore Of Lemnos, hath Achilles, swift of foot, To slav'ry sold; thee, when his sharp-edg'd spear Had robb'd thee of thy life, he dragg'd indeed Around Patroclus' tomb, his comrade dear, Whom thou hadst slain; yet so he rais'd not up Ilis dead to life again; now liest thou here, All...
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (93% in)

There are no more uses of "immortal" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®