toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

rein
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

37 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
to restrain or control; or a means of control
The meaning of rein depends upon its context. For example:
  • "keep a tight rein on the new employee," or "rein in a horse" — to control or restrain
  • "give the new employee free rein," or "give the horse full rein" — do not restrain
  • "the reins of government" — means of control
  • "the reins of the horse" — leather straps used with a bit to control a horse (You might like to think of other senses of rein as being figurative derivations from this sense.)
  • Priam, ascending, gather'd up the reins, And with Antenor by his side, the twain Drove through the Scaean gate their flying steeds.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (55% in)
  • Thus spoke the godlike King; and on the car He plac'd the consecrated lambs; himself Ascending then, he gather'd up the reins, And with Antenor by his side, the twain To Ilium's walls retrac'd their homeward way.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (65% in)
  • Take thou the whip and reins, while I descend To fight on foot; or thou the chief engage, And leave to me the conduct of the car.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (25% in)
  • This too I say, and bear my words in mind; By Pallas' counsel if my hap should be To slay them both, leave thou my horses here, The reins attaching to the chariot-rail, And seize, and from the Trojans to the ships Drive off the horses in AEneas' car; From those descended, which all-seeing Jove On Tros, for Ganymede his son, bestow'd: With these may none beneath the sun compare.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (29% in)
  • She from the battle thus her son removed; Nor did the son of Capaneus neglect The strict injunction by Tydides giv'n; His reins attaching to the chariot-rail, Far from the battle-din he check'd, and left, His own fleet steeds; then rushing forward, seiz'd, And from the Trojans tow'rd the camp drove off, The sleek-skinn'd horses of AEneas' car.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (35% in)
  • Then, his own car remounting, seiz'd the reins, And urg'd with eager haste his fiery steeds, Seeking Tydides; he, meanwhile, press'd on In keen pursuit of Venus; her he knew A weak, unwarlike Goddess, not of those That like Bellona fierce, or Pallas, range Exulting through the blood-stain'd fields of war.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (36% in)
  • He lent the steeds, with golden frontlets crown'd; In deep distress she mounted on the car: Beside her Iris stood, and took the reins, And urg'd the coursers; nothing loth they flew, And soon to high Olympus, seat of Gods, They came: swift Iris there the coursers stay'd, Loos'd from the chariot, and before them plac'd Ambrosial forage: on her mother's lap, Dione, Venus fell; she in her arms Embrac'd, and sooth'd her with her hand, and said: "Which of the heav'nly pow'rs hath wrong'd...
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (40% in)
  • Then, brave as Mars, Pylaemenes they slew, The buckler'd Paphlagonians' warlike chief; Him Menelaus, hand to hand engag'd, Pierc'd with a spear-thrust through the collar-bone; While, with a pond'rous stone, Antilochus Full on the elbow smote Atymnius' son, Mydon, his charioteer, in act to turn His fiery steeds to flight; down from his hands Fell to the ground the iv'ry-mounted reins.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (63% in)
  • Then Pallas took the whip and reins, and urg'd Direct at Mars the fiery coursers' speed.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (91% in)
  • When near they came, first Mars his pond'rous spear Advane'd beyond the yoke and horses' reins, With murd'rous aim; but Pallas from the car Turn'd it aside, and foil'd the vain attempt.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (92% in)
  • ...of all, The arrow struck him; madden'd with the pain He rear'd, then plunging forward, with the shaft Fix'd in his brain, and rolling in the dust, The other steeds in dire confusion threw; And while old Nestor with his sword essay'd To cut the reins, and free the struggling horse, Amid the rout down came the flying steeds Of Hector, guided by no timid hand, By Hector's self; then had the old man paid The forfeit of his life, but, good at need, The valiant Diomed his peril saw, And...
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (15% in)
  • The aged Nestor took the glitt'ring reins, And urg'd the horses; Hector soon they met: As on he came, his spear Tydides threw, Yet struck not Hector; but his charioteer, Who held the reins, the brave Thebaeus' son, Eniopeus, through the breast transfix'd, Beside the nipple; from the car he fell, The startled horses swerving at the sound; And from his limbs the vital spirit fled.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (20% in)
  • The aged Nestor took the glitt'ring reins, And urg'd the horses; Hector soon they met: As on he came, his spear Tydides threw, Yet struck not Hector; but his charioteer, Who held the reins, the brave Thebaeus' son, Eniopeus, through the breast transfix'd, Beside the nipple; from the car he fell, The startled horses swerving at the sound; And from his limbs the vital spirit fled.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (21% in)
  • Deep, for his comrade slain, was Hector's grief; Yet him, though griev'd, perforce he left to seek A charioteer; nor wanted long his steeds A guiding hand; for Archeptolemus, Brave son of Iphitus, he quickly found, And bade him mount his swiftly-flying car, And to his hands the glitt'ring reins transferr'd.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (22% in)
  • From Nestor's hand escap'd the glitt'ring reins, And, trembling, thus to Diomed he spoke: "Turn we to flight, Tydides; see'st thou not, That Jove from us his aiding hand withholds?
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (24% in)
  • Deep, for his comrade slain, was Hector's grief; Yet him, though griev'd at heart, perforce he left, And to Cebriones, his brother, call'd, Then near at hand, the horses' reins to take; He heard, and straight obey'd; then Hector leap'd Down from his glitt'ring chariot to the ground, His fearful war-cry shouting; in his hand A pond'rous stone he carried; and, intent To strike him down, at Teucer straight he rush'd.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (54% in)
  • Surrounded by his warriors, Rhesus slept; Beside him stood his coursers fleet, their reins Suspended to the chariot's topmost rail: Ulysses mark'd him as he lay, and said, "This is the man, Tydides, these the steeds, To us by Dolon, whom we slew, describ'd.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (78% in)
  • Meanwhile Ulysses sage the horses loos'd; He gather'd up the reins, and with his bow (For whip was none at hand) he drove them forth; Then softly whistling to Tydides gave A signal; he, the while, remain'd behind, Musing what bolder deed he yet might do; Whether the seat, whereon the arms were laid, To draw away, or, lifted high in air, To bear it off in triumph on the car; Or on the Thracians farther loss inflict; But while he mus'd, beside him Pallas stood, And said, "Bethink thee,...
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (81% in)
  • Them left he there, their bare breasts gleaming white, Stripp'd of their arms; and hasten'd in pursuit Of Antiphus and Isus, Priam's sons, A bastard one, and one legitimate, Both on one car; the bastard held the reins: Beside him stood the gallant Antiphus.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (12% in)
  • ...and bold Hippolochus, Sons of Antimachus ('twas he who chief, Seduc'd by Paris' gold and splendid gifts, Advis'd the restitution to refuse Of Helen to her Lord), the King assail'd; Both on one car; but from their hands had dropp'd The broider'd reins; bewilder'd there they stood; While, with a lion's bound, upon them sprang The son of Atreus; suppliant, in the car, They clasp'd his knees; "Give quarter, Atreus' son, Redeem our lives; our sire Antimachus Possesses goodly store of brass...
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (14% in)
  • Thus Ajax; Teucer heard, and ran in haste, And stood beside him, with his bended bow, And well-stor'd quiver: on the Trojans fast He pour'd his shafts; and struck Pisenor's son, Clitus, the comrade of Polydamas, The noble son of Panthous; he the reins Held in his hand, and all his care bestow'd To guide his horses; for, where'er the throng Was thickest, there in Hector's cause, and Troy's, He still was found; but o'er him hung the doom Which none might turn aside; for from behind The...
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (58% in)
  • Next Thestor, son of OEnops, he assail'd; He on his polish'd car, down-crouching, sat, His mind by fear disorder'd; from his hands The reins had dropp'd; him, thrusting with the spear, Through the right cheek and through the teeth he smote, Then dragg'd him, by the weapon, o'er the rail.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (46% in)
  • This way and that his two companions swerv'd; Creak'd the strong yoke, and tangled were the reins, As in the dust the prostrate courser lay.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (53% in)
  • Automedon the means of safety saw; And drawing from beside his brawny thigh His keen-edg'd sword, with no uncertain blow Cut loose the fallen horse; again set straight, The two, extended, stretch'd the tightened rein.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (54% in)
  • On th' other side, Patroclus from his car Leap'd to the ground: his left hand held his spear; And in the right a pond'rous mass he bore Of rugged stone, that fill'd his ample grasp: The stone he hurl'd; not far it miss'd its mark, Nor bootless flew; but Hector's charioteer It struck, Cebriones, a bastard son Of royal Priam, as the reins he held.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (83% in)
  • To whom Automedon, Diores' son: "Alcimedon, since none of all the Greeks May vie with thee, the mettle to control Of these immortal horses, save indeed, While yet he liv'd, Patroclus, godlike chief; But him stern death and fate have overta'en; Take thon the whip and shining reins, while I, Descending from the car, engage in fight."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (60% in)
  • He said; and, mounting on the war-car straight, Alcimedon the whip and reins assum'd; Down leap'd Automedon; great Hector saw, And thus address'd AEneas at his side: "AEneas, prince and counsellor of Troy, I see, committed to unskilful hands, Achilles' horses on the battle-field: These we may hope to take, if such thy will; For they, methinks, will scarcely stand oppos'd, Or dare th' encounter of our joint assault."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (61% in)
  • Headlong he fell to earth, and dropp'd the reins: These, stooping from the car, Meriones Caught up, and thus Idomeneus address'd: "Ply now the lash, until thou reach the ships: Thyself must see how crush'd the strength of Greece."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (79% in)
  • With care Automedon and Alcimus The horses yok'd, with collars fair attach'd: Plac'd in their mouths the bits, and pass'd the reins Back to the well-built car: Automedon Sprang on the car, with shining lash in hand: Behind, Achilles came, array'd for war, In arms all glitt'ring as the gorgeous sun, And loudly to his father's steeds he call'd: "Xanthus and Balius, noble progeny Of swift Podarge, now in other sort Back to the Grecian ranks in safety bear, When he shall quit the field,...
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (90% in)
  • Another, with inferior horses far, But better skill'd, still fixing on the goal His eye, turns closely round, nor overlooks The moment when to draw the rein; but holds His steady course, and on the leader waits.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (35% in)
  • There drive, as only not to graze the post; And leaning o'er the wicker body, leave Close on the left the stones; thine offside horse Then urge with voice and whip, and slack his rein, And let the nearside horse so closely graze, As that thy nave may seem to touch, the goal: But yet beware, lest, striking on the stone, Thy steeds thou injure, and thy chariot break, A source of triumph to thy rivals all, Of shame to thee; but thou sage caution use; For, following, if thou make the turn...
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (37% in)
  • Then all at once their whips they rais'd, and urg'd By rein, and hand, and voice, their eager steeds.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (39% in)
  • Perchance the charioteer has dropp'd the reins, Or round the goal he could not hold the mares; Perchance has miss'd the turn, and on the plain Is lying now beside his broken car, While from the course his mettled steeds have flown.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (50% in)
  • The same are leading now, that led at first, Eumelus' mares; 'tis he that holds the reins."
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (52% in)
  • They were twin brothers; one who held the reins, Still drove, and drove; the other plied the whip.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (69% in)
  • Thus spoke the Guardian-God, and on the car Mounting in haste, he took the whip and reins, And with fresh vigour mules and horses fill'd.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (55% in)
  • According to our modern notions, it is not very evident what advantage two men in a car would have over one in another; nor what would be gained by the division of labour which assigned the reins to one and the whip to the other; but such, from line 740-741, appears to have been the view taken by Homer.
    Footnotes (98% in)

There are no more uses of "rein" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®