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poise
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

12 uses
  • He said; and, poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear, And struck Tydides' shield; right through the shield Drove the keen weapon, and the breastplate reach'd.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (30% in)
  • He said, and poising, hurl'd his weighty spear: Full in the midst it struck the buckler round; Right through the buckler pass'd the sturdy spear, And through the gorgeous breastplate, and within Cut through the linen vest; but Paris, back Inclining, stoop'd, and shunn'd the doom of death.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (74% in)
  • Then Menelaus, good in battle, took Adrastus captive; for his horses, scar'd And rushing wildly o'er the plain, amid The tangled tamarisk scrub his chariot broke, Snapping the pole; they with the flying crowd Held city-ward their course; he from the car Hurl'd headlong, prostrate lay beside the wheel, Prone on his face in dust; and at his side, Poising his mighty spear, Atrides stood.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (8% in)
  • He said; and, poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear; The brazen cov'ring of the shield it struck, The outward fold, the eighth, above the sev'n Of tough bull's-hide; through six it drove its way With stubborn force; but in the seventh was stay'd, Then Ajax hurl'd in turn his pond'rous spear, And struck the circle true of Hector's shield; Right thro' the glitt'ring shield the stout spear pass'd, And thro' the well-wrought breastplate drove its way; And, underneath, the linen vest it tore;...
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (48% in)
  • He said, and, poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear, And not in vain; on Hector's head it struck His helmet's crest, but, brass encount'ring brass, Himself it reach'd not; for the visor'd helm, Apollo's gift, three-plated, stay'd its force.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (41% in)
  • One spear Achilles had, long, pond'rous, tough; But this he touch'd not; none of all the Greeks, None, save Achilles' self, that spear could poise; The far-fam'd Pelian ash, which to his sire, On Pelion's summit fell'd, to be the bane Of mightiest chiefs, the Centaur Chiron gave.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (16% in)
  • He said, and, poising, hurl'd the pond'rous spear; Full on Aretus' broad-orb'd shield it struck; Nor stay'd the shield its course; the brazen point Drove through the belt, and in his body lodg'd.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (65% in)
  • Last, from its case he drew his father's spear, Long, pond'rous, tough; not one of all the Greeks, None, save Achilles' self, could poise that spear; The far-fam'd Pelian ash, which to his sire, On Pelion's summit fell'd, to be the bane Of mighty chiefs, the Centaur Chiron gave.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (88% in)
  • He said, and, poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear, Which from Achilles Pallas turn'd aside With lightest breath; and back to Hector sent, And laid before his feet; intent to slay, Onward Achilles rush'd, with fearful shout; But Phoebus Hector from the field convey'd, (As Gods can only,) veil'd in thickest cloud.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (83% in)
  • Not long they stood aloof, led on by Mars The buckler-breaker, who to Pallas first, Poising his spear, his bitter speech address'd: "What dost thou here, thou saucy jade, to war The Gods exciting, overbold of mood, Led by thy haughty spirit? dost thou forget How thou the son of Tydeus, Diomed, Didst urge against me, and with visible spear Direct his aim, and aid to wound my flesh?
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (62% in)
  • He said, and poising, hurl'd his weighty spear; But Hector saw, and shunn'd the blow; he stoop'd, And o'er his shoulder flew the brass-tipp'd spear, And in the ground was fix'd; but Pallas drew The weapon forth, and to Achilles' hand, All unobserv'd of Hector, gave it back.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (50% in)
  • He said, and poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear; Nor miss'd his aim; full in the midst he struck Pelides' shield; but glancing from the shield The weapon bounded off.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (53% in)

There are no more uses of "poise" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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