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mane
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

11 uses
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Definition
long coarse hair such as that which grows around a lion's head or on the back of a horse's neck
  • As some proud steed, at well-fill'd manger fed, His halter broken, neighing, scours the plain, And revels in the widely-flowing stream To bathe his sides; then tossing high his head, While o'er his shoulders streams his ample mane.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (91% in)
  • He said, and straight the brazen-footed steeds, Of swiftest flight, with manes of flowing gold, He harness'd to his chariot; all in gold Himself array'd, the golden lash he grasp'd, Of curious work; and mounting on his car, Urg'd the fleet coursers; nothing loth, they flew Midway betwixt the earth and starry heav'n.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (7% in)
  • ...of Mars; Gerenian Nestor, aged prop of Greece, Alone remain'd, and he against his will, His horse sore wounded by an arrow shot By godlike Paris, fair-hair'd Helen's Lord: Just on the crown, where close behind the head First springs the mane, the deadliest spot of all, The arrow struck him; madden'd with the pain He rear'd, then plunging forward, with the shaft Fix'd in his brain, and rolling in the dust, The other steeds in dire confusion threw; And while old Nestor with his sword...
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (15% in)
  • Three strides he took; the fourth, he reach'd his goal, AEgae; where on the margin of the bay His temple stood, all glitt'ring, all of gold, Imperishable; there arriv'd, he yok'd Beneath his car the brazen-footed steeds, Of swiftest flight, with manes of flowing gold.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (6% in)
  • As some proud steed, at well-fill'd manger fed, His halter broken, neighing, scours the plain, And revels in the widely-flowing stream To bathe his sides; then tossing high his head, While o'er his shoulders streams his ample mane, Light-borne on active limbs, in conscious pride, To the wide pastures of the mares he flies; So vig'rous, Hector plied his active limbs, His horsemen summoning at Heav'n's command.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (35% in)
  • As when a rustic crowd of men and dogs Have chas'd an antler'd stag, or mountain goat, That 'mid the crags and thick o'ershadowing wood Hath refuge found, and baffled their pursuit: If, by the tumult rous'd, a lion stand, With bristling mane, before them, back they turn, Check'd in their mid career; ev'n so the Greeks, Who late in eager throngs were pressing on, Thrusting with swords and double-pointed spears, When Hector moving through the ranks they saw, Recoil'd, and to their feet...
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (36% in)
  • ...to rouse them with the lash, In vain with honey'd words, in vain with threats; Nor to the ships would they return again By the broad Hellespont, nor join the fray; But as a column stands, which marks the tomb Of man or woman, so immovable Beneath the splendid car they stood, their heads Down-drooping to the ground, while scalding tears Dropp'd earthward from their eyelids, as they mourn'd Their charioteer; and o'er the yoke-band shed Down stream'd their ample manes, with dust defil'd.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (55% in)
  • He said, and in their breasts fresh spirit infus'd; They, shaking from their manes the dust, the car Amid the Greeks and Trojans lightly bore.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (58% in)
  • To whom in answer from beneath the yoke Xanthus, the noble horse, with glancing feet: Bowing his head the while, till all his mane Down from th' yokeband streaming, reach'd the ground; By Juno, white-arm'd Queen, with speech endued: "Yes, great Achilles, we this day again Will bear thee safely; but thy day of doom Is nigh at hand; nor we shall cause thy death, But Heav'n's high will, and Fate's imperious pow'r.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (92% in)
  • But from the present strife we stand aloof, My horses and myself; they now have lost The daring courage and the gentle hand Of him who drove them, and with water pure Wash'd oft their manes, and bath'd with fragrant oil.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (31% in)
  • They from the ships pursued their rapid course Athwart the distant plain; beneath their chests Rose like a cloud, or hurricane, the dust; Loose floated on the breeze their ample manes; The cars now skimm'd along the fertile ground, Now bounded high in air; the charioteers Stood up aloft, and ev'ry bosom beat With hope of vict'ry; each with eager shout Cheering his steeds, that scour'd the dusty plain.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (40% in)

There are no more uses of "mane" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia - Lion's ManeWikipedia - Horse's Mane