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wrath
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

100 uses
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Definition
extreme anger or angry punishment
  • Atrides, curb thy wrath! while I beseech Achilles to forbear; in whom the Greeks From adverse war their great defender see.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (47% in)
  • Jove's and Latona's son; he, filled with wrath Against the King, with deadly pestilence The camp afflicted,—and the people died,— For Chryses' sake, his priest, whom Atreus' son With scorn dismiss'd, when to the Grecian ships He came, his captive daughter to redeem, With costly ransom charg'd; and in his hand The sacred fillet of his God he bore, And golden staff; to all he sued, but chief To Atreus' sons, twin captains of the host: "Ye sons of Atreus, and ye well-greav'd Greeks, May...
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (6% in)
  • Thus as he pray'd, his pray'r Apollo heard: Along Olympus' heights he pass'd, his heart Burning with wrath; behind his shoulders hung His bow, and ample quiver; at his back Rattled the fateful arrows as he mov'd; Like the night-cloud he pass'd, and from afar He bent against the ships, and sped the bolt; And fierce and deadly twang'd the silver bow.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (11% in)
  • But seek we first some prophet, or some priest, Or some wise vision-seer (since visions too From Jove proceed), who may the cause explain, Which with such deadly wrath Apollo fires: If for neglected hecatombs or pray'rs He blame us; or if fat of lambs and goats May soothe his anger and the plague assuage."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (14% in)
  • For well I know my speech must one offend, The Argive chief, o'er all the Greeks supreme; And terrible to men of low estate The anger of a King; for though awhile He veil his wrath, yet in his bosom pent It still is nurs'd, until the time arrive; Say, then, wilt thou protect me, if I speak?"
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (17% in)
  • But this I promise, and will make it good, The time shall come, when for this insolence A threefold compensation shall be thine; Only be sway'd by me, and curb thy wrath."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (37% in)
  • But Peleus' son, with undiminish'd wrath, Atrides thus with bitter words address'd: "Thou sot, with eye of dog, and heart of deer!
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (38% in)
  • Thus spoke Pelides; and upon the ground He cast his staff, with golden studs emboss'd, And took his seat; on th' other side, in wrath, Atrides burn'd; but Nestor interpos'd; Nestor, the leader of the Pylian host, The smooth-tongued chief, from whose persuasive lips Sweeter than honey flowed the stream of speech.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (42% in)
  • Against the Greeks he bent his fatal bow, And fast the people fell; on ev'ry side Throughout the camp the heav'nly arrows flew; A skilful seer at length the cause reveal'd Why thus incens'd the Archer-God; I then, The first, gave counsel to appease his wrath.
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (62% in)
  • Her to the altar straight Ulysses led, The wise in counsel; in her father's hand He plac'd the maiden, and address'd him thus: "Chryses, from Agamemnon, King of men, To thee I come, thy daughter to restore; And to thy God, upon the Greeks' behalf, To offer sacrifice, if haply so We may appease his wrath, who now incens'd With grievous suff'ring visits all our host."
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (71% in)
  • ...dwelt, And Thyrum, by the ford of Alpheus' stream, In Cyparissus and Amphigene, Pteleon, and lofty OEpus' well-built fort, Helos, and Dorium, where the Muses met, And put to silence Thracian Thamyris, As from OEchalia, from the royal house Of Eurytus he came; he, over-bold, Boasted himself pre-eminent in song, Ev'n though the daughters of Olympian Jove, The Muses, were his rivals: they in wrath Him of his sight at once and powr'r of song Amerc'd, and bade his hand forget the lyre.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (68% in)
  • For Peleus' godlike son, the swift of foot, Lay idly in his tent, the loss resenting Of Brises' fair-hair'd daughter; whom himself Had chosen, prize of all his warlike toil, When he Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebes O'erthrew, and Mynes and Epistrophus Struck down, bold warriors both, Evenus' sons, Selepius' royal heir; for her in wrath, He held aloof, but soon again to appear.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (78% in)
  • Of men, while yet Achilles held his wrath, The mightiest far was Ajax Telamon.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (86% in)
  • Such was the host, which, like devouring fire, O'erspread the land; the earth beneath them groan'd: As when the Lord of thunder, in his wrath, The earth's foundations shakes, in Arimi, Where, buried deep, 'tis said, Typhoeus lies; So at their coming, groan'd beneath their feet The earth, as quickly o'er the plain they spread.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (87% in)
  • To whom in anger heav'nly Venus spoke: "Incense me not, poor fool! lest I in wrath Desert thee quite, and as I heretofore Have lov'd, so make thee object of my hate; And kindle, 'twixt the Trojans and the Greeks, Such bitter feuds, as both shall wreak on thee."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (87% in)
  • Then Jove, with cutting words and taunting tone, Began the wrath of Juno to provoke: "Two Goddesses for Menelaus fight, Thou, Juno, Queen of Argos, and with thee Minerva, shield of warriors; but ye two Sitting aloof, well-pleased it seems, look on; While laughter-loving Venus, at the side Of Paris standing, still averts his fate, And rescues, when, as now, expecting death.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (1% in)
  • To whom, in wrath, the Cloud-compeller thus: "Revengeful! how have Priam and his sons So deeply injur'd thee, that thus thou seek'st With unabated anger to pursue, Till thou o'erthrow, the strong-built walls of Troy?
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (5% in)
  • Yet hear my words, and ponder what I say: If e'er, in times to come, my will should be Some city to destroy, inhabited By men beloved of thee, seek not to turn My wrath aside, but yield, as I do now, Consenting, but with heart that ill consents; For of all cities fair, beneath the sun And starry Heaven, the abode of mortal men, None to my soul was dear as sacred Troy, And Priam's self, and Priam's warrior race.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (7% in)
  • Thy work undone; and with insulting scorn Some vaunting Trojan, leaping on the tomb Of noble Menelaus, thus shall say: 'On all his foes may Agamemnon so His wrath accomplish, who hath hither led Of Greeks a mighty army, all in vain; And bootless home with empty ships hath gone, And valiant Menelaus left behind;' Thus when men speak, gape, earth, and hide my shame."
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (32% in)
  • From Ilium's heights Apollo, filled with wrath, Look'd down, and to the Trojans shouted loud: "Uprouse ye, valiant Trojans! give not way Before the Greeks; their bodies are not stone, Nor iron, to defy your trenchant swords; And great Achilles, fair-hair'd Thetis' son, Fights not, but o'er his anger broods apart."
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (90% in)
  • Now when the Trojans Dares' sons beheld, The one in flight, the other stretch'd in death, Their spirits within them quail'd; but Pallas took The hand of Mars, and thus address'd the God: "Mars, Mars, thou bane of mortals, blood-stain'd Lord, Razer of cities, wherefore leave we not The Greeks and Trojans to contend, and see To which the sire of all will vict'ry give; While we retire, and shun the wrath of Jove?"
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (4% in)
  • He said; and Diomed a little space Before the Far-destroyer's wrath retir'd: Apollo then AEneas bore away Far from the tumult; and in Pergamus, Where stood his sacred shrine, bestow'd him safe.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (48% in)
  • But fate had not decreed the valiant son Of Jove to fall beneath Ulysses' hand; So on the Lycians Pallas turn'd his wrath.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (73% in)
  • Bellerophon at length the wrath incurr'd Of all the Gods; and to th' Aleian plain Alone he wander'd; there he wore away His soul, and shunn'd the busy haunts of men.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (36% in)
  • Insatiate Mars his son Isander slew In battle with the valiant Solymi: His daughter perish'd by Diana's wrath.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (37% in)
  • Both armies pass the night in feasting, but Jupiter disheartens the Trojans with thunder and other signs of his wrath.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (99% in)
  • Beseems thee not such folly; curb thy wrath, Though vex'd; nor think with Hector to contend, Thy better far, inspiring dread in all.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (22% in)
  • This by the son of Telamon was borne Before his breast; to Hector close he came, And thus with words of haughty menace spoke: "Hector, I now shall teach thee, man to man, The mettle of the chiefs we yet possess, Although Achilles of the lion heart, Mighty in battle, be not with us still; He by his ocean-going ships indeed Against Atrides nurses still his wrath; Yet are there those who dare encounter thee, And not a few; then now begin the fight."
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (45% in)
  • To whom in wrath the Cloud-compeller thus: "Neptune, Earth-shaking King, what words are these?
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (89% in)
  • Yet they in AEgae and in Helice, With grateful off'rings rich thine altars crown; Then give we them the vict'ry; if we all Who favour Greece, together should combine To put to flight the Trojans, and restrain All-seeing Jove, he might be left alone, On Ida's summit to digest his wrath."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (36% in)
  • To whom again The blue-ey'd Goddess, Pallas, thus replied: "I too would fain behold him robb'd of life, In his own country slain by Grecian hands; But that my sire, by ill advice misled, Rages in wrath, still thwarting all my plans; Forgetting now how oft his son I sav'd, Sore wearied with the toils Eurystheus gave.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (61% in)
  • The fiery car she mounted; in her hand A spear she bore, long, weighty, tough; wherewith The mighty daughter of a mighty sire Sweeps down the ranks of those her wrath pursues.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (67% in)
  • From Ida's heights the son of Saturn saw, And, fill'd with wrath, the heav'nly messenger, The golden-winged Iris, thus bespoke: "Haste thee, swift Iris; turn them back, and warn That farther they advance not: 'tis not meet That they and I in war should be oppos'd.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (68% in)
  • Juno less moves my wonder and my wrath; Whate'er I plan, 'tis still her wont to thwart."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (69% in)
  • Juno less moves his wonder and his wrath; Whate'er he plans, 'tis still her wont to thwart; But over-bold and void of shame art thou, If against Jove thou dare to lift thy spear."
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (72% in)
  • To whom the Cloud-compeller thus replied: "Yet greater slaughter, stag-ey'd Queen of Heav'n, To-morrow shalt thou see, if so thou list, Wrought on the warrior Greeks by Saturn's son; For Hector's proud career shall not be check'd Until the wrath of Peleus' godlike son Beside the ships be kindled, in the day When round Patroclus' corpse, in narrow space, E'en by the vessels' sterns, the war shall rage.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (81% in)
  • Such is the voice of destiny: for thee, I reck not of thy wrath; nor should I care Though thou wert thrust beneath the lowest deep Of earth and ocean, where Iapetus And Saturn lie, uncheer'd by ray of sun Or breath of air, in Tartarus profound.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (81% in)
  • ...Which I maintain, and ever have maintain'd, Ev'n from the day when thou, great King, didst bear The fair Briseis from Achilles' tent Despite his anger—not by my advice: I fain would have dissuaded thee, but thou, Following the dictates of thy wrathful pride, Didst to our bravest wrong, dishon'ring him Whom ev'n th' Immortals honour'd; for his prize Thou took'st and still retain'st; but let us now Consider, if ev'n yet, with costly gifts And soothing words, we may his wrath appease."
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (15% in)
  • ...Which I maintain, and ever have maintain'd, Ev'n from the day when thou, great King, didst bear The fair Briseis from Achilles' tent Despite his anger—not by my advice: I fain would have dissuaded thee, but thou, Following the dictates of thy wrathful pride, Didst to our bravest wrong, dishon'ring him Whom ev'n th' Immortals honour'd; for his prize Thou took'st and still retain'st; but let us now Consider, if ev'n yet, with costly gifts And soothing words, we may his wrath appease."
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (15% in)
  • This will I do, so he his wrath remit: Then let him yield (Pluto alone remains Unbending and inexorable; and thence Of all the Gods is most abhorr'd of men), To me submitting, as in royal pow'r Superior far, and more advanc'd in age."
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (21% in)
  • Such were the words thine aged father spoke, Which thou hast now forgotten; yet, e'en now, Pause for awhile, and let thine anger cool; And noble gifts, so thou thy wrath remit, From Agamemnon shalt thou bear away.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (36% in)
  • All these he gives, so thou thy wrath remit.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (42% in)
  • At length, in tears, the aged Phoenix spoke, For greatly fear'd he for the ships of Greece: "If, great Achilles, on returning home Thy mind is set, nor canst thou be induc'd To save the ships from fire, so fierce thy wrath; How then, dear boy, can I remain behind, Alone? whom with thee aged Peleus sent, That day when he in Agamemnon's cause From Phthia sent thee, inexperienc'd yet In all the duties of confed'rate war, And sage debate, on which attends renown.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (60% in)
  • Till now, I grant thee, none could blame thy wrath.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (72% in)
  • The other Gods their hecatombs receiv'd; Diana's shrine alone no off'rings deck'd, Neglected, or o'erlook'd; the sin was great; And in her wrath the arrow-darting Queen A savage wild-boar sent, with gleaming tusks, Which OEneus' vineyard haunting, wrought him harm.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (74% in)
  • With her, retiring from the field, he nurs'd His wrath; resenting thus his mother's curse, Althaea; she her brother's death bore hard, And pray'd to Heav'n above, and with her hands Beating the solid earth, the nether pow'rs, Pluto and awful Proserpine, implor'd, Down on her knees, her bosom wet with tears, Death on her son invoking; from the depths Of Erebus Erinnys heard her pray'r, Gloom-haunting Goddess, dark and stern of heart.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (77% in)
  • First Agamemnon, King of men, enquir'd: "Tell me, renown'd Ulysses, pride of Greece, What says he: will he save our ships from fire, Or still, in wrathful mood, withhold his aid?"
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (92% in)
  • To whom Gerenian Nestor thus replied; "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, Not all the hopes that Hector entertains Shall by the Lord of counsel be fulfill'd; For him are toil and danger yet in store, If but Achilles of his wrath repent.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (17% in)
  • While Hector liv'd, and Peleus' son his wrath Retain'd, and Priam's city untaken stood; So long the Grecian wall remain'd entire: But of the Trojans when the best had fall'n, Of Greeks, when some were slain, some yet surviv'd; When the tenth year had seen the fall of Troy, And Greeks, embark'd, had ta'en their homeward way, Then Neptune and Apollo counsel took To sap the wall by aid of all the streams That seaward from the heights of Ida flow; Rhesus, Caresus, and Heptaporus, Granicus,...
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (2% in)
  • Heav'n! can it be that I of other Greeks, As of Achilles, have incurr'd the wrath, Who thence refuse to battle for the ships?"
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (9% in)
  • Or wilt thou say me nay, in wrath that I Espouse the Greek, as thou the Trojan cause?
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (35% in)
  • ...Oceanus, The sire of Gods, and Tethys, who of yore From Rhaea took me, when all-seeing Jove Hurl'd Saturn down below the earth and seas, And nurs'd me in their home with tend'rest care; I go to visit them, and reconcile A lengthen'd feud; for since some cause of wrath Has come between them, they from rites of love And from the marriage-bed have long abstain'd: Could I unite them by persuasive words, And to their former intercourse restore, Their love and rev'rence were for ever mine."
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (38% in)
  • ...sweet constraint I bound the sense of aegis-bearing Jove, While thou, with ill-design, rousing the force Of winds tempestuous o'er the stormy sea, Didst cast him forth on Coos' thriving isle, Far from his friends; then Jove, awaking, pour'd His wrath, promiscuous, on th' assembled Gods; Me chief his anger sought; and from on high Had hurl'd me, plung'd beneath th' unfathom'd sea, But Night, the vanquisher of Gods and men, Her fugitive received me; he his wrath Repress'd, unwilling to...
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (47% in)
  • ...force Of winds tempestuous o'er the stormy sea, Didst cast him forth on Coos' thriving isle, Far from his friends; then Jove, awaking, pour'd His wrath, promiscuous, on th' assembled Gods; Me chief his anger sought; and from on high Had hurl'd me, plung'd beneath th' unfathom'd sea, But Night, the vanquisher of Gods and men, Her fugitive received me; he his wrath Repress'd, unwilling to invade the claims Of holy Night; and now thou fain wouldst urge That I another reckless deed essay."
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (47% in)
  • I go to visit them, and reconcile A lengthen'd feud; for since some cause of wrath Has come between them, they from rites of love And from the marriage-bed have long abstain'd.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (56% in)
  • Such is his boast and menace, since in wrath Achilles still beside his ships remains.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (67% in)
  • Yet was not quench'd My wrath on godlike Hercules' account, Whom thou, with Boreas, o'er the wat'ry waste With fell intent didst send; and tempest-toss'd, Cast him ashore on Coos' fruitful isle.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (3% in)
  • ...the weightiest oath Of solemn pow'r to bind the blessed Gods; By thine own sacred head, our nuptial bed, Whose holy tie I never could forswear; That not by my suggestion and advice Earth-shaking Neptune on the Trojan host, And Hector, pours his wrath, and aids the Greeks; In this he but obeys his own desire, Who looks with pity on the Grecian host Beside their ships o'erborne; and could my words Prevail, my counsel were to shape his course, O cloud-girt King, obedient to thy will."
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (6% in)
  • She said, and sat; the Gods, oppress'd with care, Her farther speech awaited; on her lips There dwelt indeed a smile, but not a ray Pass'd o'er her dark'ning brow, as thus her wrath Amid th' assembled Gods found vent in words: "Fools are we all, who madly strive with Jove, Or hope, by access to his throne, to sway, By word or deed, his course; from all apart, He all our counsels heeds not, but derides; And boasts o'er all th' immortal Gods to reign In unapproach'd pre-eminence of...
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (13% in)
  • Then from the throne of Jove had heavier wrath And deeper vengeance on th' Immortals fall'n, But Pallas, in alarm for all the Gods, Quitting in haste the throne whereon she sat, Sprang past the vestibule, and from his head The helmet lifted, from his arm the shield; Took from his sturdy hand, and rear'd upright, The brazen spear; then with reproachful words She thus assail'd th' impetuous God of War; "Frantic, and passion-maddened, thou art lost!
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (16% in)
  • At once from valiant Trojans and from Greeks His thoughts would be diverted, and his wrath Embroil Olympus, and on all alike, Guilty or not, his anger would be pour'd.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (18% in)
  • To whom in tow'ring wrath th' Earth-shaking God: "By Heav'n, though great he be, he yet presumes Somewhat too far, if me, his equal born, He seeks by force to baffle of my will.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (24% in)
  • But let the past be past; I never meant My wrath should have no end; yet had not thought My anger to abate, till my own ships Should hear the war-cry, and the battle bear, But go, and in my well-known armour clad, Lead forth the valiant Myrmidons to war, Since the dark cloud of Trojans circles round The ships in force; and on the shingly beach, Pent up in narrow limits, lie the Greeks; And all the city hath pour'd its numbers forth In hope undoubting; for they see no more My helm among...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (7% in)
  • The fourth, the aged warrior Phoenix led; The fifth, Alcimedon, Laerces' son: These in their order due Achilles first Array'd, and next with stirring words address'd: "Ye Myrmidons, forget not now the vaunts Which, while my wrath endur'd, ye largely pour'd Upon the Trojans; me ye freely blam'd; 'Ill-omen'd son of Peleus, sure in wrath Thou wast conceiv'd, implacable, who here In idleness enforc'd thy comrades keep'st!
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (22% in)
  • The fourth, the aged warrior Phoenix led; The fifth, Alcimedon, Laerces' son: These in their order due Achilles first Array'd, and next with stirring words address'd: "Ye Myrmidons, forget not now the vaunts Which, while my wrath endur'd, ye largely pour'd Upon the Trojans; me ye freely blam'd; 'Ill-omen'd son of Peleus, sure in wrath Thou wast conceiv'd, implacable, who here In idleness enforc'd thy comrades keep'st!
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (22% in)
  • Thick on the Trojan host their masses fell; While loud the fleet re-echoed to the sound Of Grecian cheers; but when the Trojans saw, Blazing in arms, Menoetius' godlike son, Himself, and follower; quail'd the spirits of all; Their firm-set ranks were shaken; for they deem'd Achilles had beside the ships exchang'd His wrath for friendship; and each sev'ral man Look'd round, to find his own escape from death.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (31% in)
  • As in th' autumnal season, when the earth With weight of rain is saturate; when Jove Pours down his fiercest storms in wrath to men, Who in their courts unrighteous judgments pass, And justice yield to lawless violence, The wrath of Heav'n despising; ev'ry stream Is brimming o'er: the hills in gullies deep Are by the torrents seam'd, which, rushing down From the high mountains to the dark-blue sea, With groans and tumult urge their headlong course, Wasting the works of man; so urg'd...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (44% in)
  • As in th' autumnal season, when the earth With weight of rain is saturate; when Jove Pours down his fiercest storms in wrath to men, Who in their courts unrighteous judgments pass, And justice yield to lawless violence, The wrath of Heav'n despising; ev'ry stream Is brimming o'er: the hills in gullies deep Are by the torrents seam'd, which, rushing down From the high mountains to the dark-blue sea, With groans and tumult urge their headlong course, Wasting the works of man; so urg'd...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (44% in)
  • Then at Meriones AEneas threw His brazen spear, in hopes beneath his shield To find a spot unguarded; he beheld, And downward stooping, shunn'd the brazen death; Behind him far, deep in the soil infix'd, The weapon stood; there Mars its impulse stay'd; So, bootless hurl'd, though by no feeble hand, AEneas' spear stood quiv'ring in the ground; Then thus in wrath he cried: "Meriones, Had it but struck thee, nimble as thou art, My spear had brought thy dancing to a close."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (69% in)
  • Thus as he spoke, Patroclus backward stepp'd, Shrinking before the Far-destroyer's wrath.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (80% in)
  • And as a lion, in the mountains bred, In pride of strength, amid the pasturing herd Seizes a heifer in his pow'rful jaws, The choicest; and, her neck first broken, rends, And, on her entrails gorging, laps the blood; Though with loud clamour dogs and herdsmen round Assail him from afar, yet ventures none To meet his rage, for fear is on them all; So none was there so bold, with dauntless breast The noble Menelaus' wrath to meet.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (9% in)
  • Nor, noble Menelaus, did thy heart Incline thee to remain, and aid thy friends, Where from their war-worn ranks the Pylian troops Deplor'd the absence of Antilochus; But these in godlike Thrasymedes' charge He left; and to Patroclus hast'ning back, Beside th' Ajaces stood, as thus he spoke: "Him to Achilles, to the ships, in haste I have despatch'd; yet fiercely as his wrath May burn tow'rd Hector, I can scarce expect His presence here; for how could he, unarm'd, With Trojans fight?
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (90% in)
  • From death not e'en the might of Hercules, Though best belov'd of Saturn's son, could fly, By fate and Juno's bitter wrath subdued.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (18% in)
  • While fiercely burn'd 'gainst Atreus' godlike son That mighty warrior's wrath, 'twas easier far With th' other Greeks to deal; and I rejoic'd When by the ships we pass'd the night, in hopes We soon might call them ours; but now, I own Achilles, swift of foot, excites my fear.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (39% in)
  • What? have ye not already long enough Been coop'd within the tow'rs? the wealth of Troy, Its brass, its gold, were once the common theme Of ev'ry tongue; our hoarded treasures now Are gone, to Phrygian and Maeonian shores For sale exported, costly merchandise, Since on our city fell the wrath of Jove.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (44% in)
  • With awe the Myrmidons beheld; nor dar'd Affront the sight: but as Achilles gaz'd, More fiery burn'd his wrath; beneath his brows His eyes like lightning flash'd; with fierce delight He seiz'd the glorious gift: and when his soul Had feasted on the miracle of art, To Thetis thus his winged words address'd: "Mother, the God hath giv'n me arms indeed, Worthy a God, and such as mortal man Could never forge; I go to arm me straight; Yet fear I for Menoetius' noble son, Lest in his...
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (3% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus the silver-footed Queen: "Let not such fears, my son, disturb thy mind: I will myself the swarms of flies disperse, That on the flesh of slaughter'd warriors prey: And should he here remain a year complete, Still should his flesh be firm and fresh as now: But thou to council call the chiefs of Greece; Against the monarch Agamemnon there, The leader of the host, abjure thy wrath; Then arm thee quickly, and put on thy might."
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (7% in)
  • My wrath I here abjure; it is not meet It burn for ever unappeas'd; do thou Muster to battle straight the long-hair'd Greeks; That, to the Trojans once again oppos'd, I may make trial if beside the ships They dare this night remain; but he, I ween, Will gladly rest his limbs, who safe shall fly, My spear escaping, from the battle-field."
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (14% in)
  • He said: the well-greav'd Greeks rejoic'd to hear His wrath abjur'd by Peleus' godlike son; And from his seat, not standing in the midst, Thus to th' assembly Agamemnon spoke: "Friends, Grecian Heroes, Ministers of Mars, When one stands up to speak, 'tis meet for all To lend a patient ear, nor interrupt; For e'en to practis'd speakers hard the task: But, in this vast assembly, who can speak That all may hear? the clearest voice must fail.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (16% in)
  • She said: keen sorrow deeply pierc'd his soul; Then Ate by the glossy locks he seiz'd In mighty wrath; and swore a solemn oath, That to Olympus and the starry Heav'n She never should return, who all misleads.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (28% in)
  • Thus as he spoke, across the victim's throat He drew the pitiless blade; Talthybius then To hoary Ocean's depths the carcase threw, Food for the fishes; then Achilles rose, And thus before th' assembled Greeks he spoke: "O Father Jove, how dost thou lead astray Our human judgments! ne'er had Atreus' son My bosom fill'd with wrath, nor from my arms, To his own loss, against my will had torn The girl I lov'd, but that the will of Jove To death predestin'd many a valiant Greek.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (61% in)
  • His teeth were gnashing audibly; his eye Blaz'd with, the light of fire; but in his heart Was grief unbearable; with furious wrath He burn'd against the Trojans, as he donn'd The heav'nly gifts, the work of Vulcan's hand.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (83% in)
  • To whom in wrath Achilles swift of foot; "Xanthus, why thus predict my coming fate?
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (95% in)
  • Him when Achilles, swift of foot, beheld, No spear in hand, of helm and shield bereft, All flung in haste away, as from the stream, Reeking with sweat, and faint with toil, he fled, He commun'd, wrathful, with his mighty heart: "Ye Gods, what marvel do mine eyes behold!
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (8% in)
  • Now to thy hands once more my cruel fate Consigns me; surely by the wrath of Jove Pursued, who gives me to thy pow'r again.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (13% in)
  • Thersilochus and Mydon then he slew, Mnesus and Thrasius and Astypylus, AEnius and Ophelestes; and yet more Had been the slaughter by Achilles wrought, But from his eddying depths, in human form, With wrathful tone the mighty River spoke: "In strength, Achilles, and in deeds of arms, All mortals thou surpassest; for the Gods Themselves attend thee, and protect from harm; If Saturn's son have given thee utterly The Trojans to destroy, yet, ere thou slay, Far from my waters drive them...
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (33% in)
  • The eels and fishes, 'mid the eddying whirl, 'Mid the clear wave were hurrying here and there, In dire distress from Vulcan's fiery breath: Scorch'd by the flames, the mighty River spoke: "Vulcan, no God against thy pow'r can stand, Nor with thy fiery flames will I contend; Restrain thy wrath; though Peleus' godlike son Should from their city drive the Trojans straight, With rival parties what concern have I?"
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (56% in)
  • ...bubbling up, As when a caldron on a blazing fire, Fill'd with the melting fat of well-fed swine, Boils up within, and bubbles all around, With well-dried wood beneath, so bubbling up The waters of the lovely River boil'd: Nor onward would he flow, but check'd his course, By the hot blast o'er-borne, and fiery strength Of skilful Vulcan; and to Juno thus, Imploring, he his winged words address'd: "Juno, what cause impels thy son, my stream, O'er all the rest, to visit with his wrath?
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (58% in)
  • Xanthus thus subdued, These two their warfare ceas'd, by Juno check'd, Despite her wrath; but 'mid the other Gods Arose contention fierce, and discord dire, Their warring passions rous'd on either side.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (60% in)
  • Bear thus the burthen of thy mother's curse, Who works thee harm, in wrath that thou the Greeks Deserting, aid'st the haughty Trojans' cause."
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (65% in)
  • Thus she; Apollo answer'd not a word; But Jove's imperial consort, fill'd with wrath, Assail'd with bitter words the Archer-Queen.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (75% in)
  • As in a city, which the Gods in wrath Have fir'd, whose volleying smoke ascends to Heav'n, On all her people grievous toil is cast, On many, harm and loss; such toil, such loss Achilles wrought amid the Trojan host.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (82% in)
  • Achilles' wrath was rous'd: with fury wild His soul was fill'd: before his breast he bore His well-wrought shield; and fiercely on his brow Nodded the four-plum'd helm, as on the breeze Floated the golden hairs, with which the crest By Vulcan's hand was thickly interlac'd; And as amid the stars' unnumber'd host, When twilight yields to night, one star appears, Hesper, the brightest star that shines in Heav'n, Gleam'd the sharp-pointed lance, which in his right Achilles pois'd, on...
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (58% in)
  • But see that on thy head I bring not down The wrath of Heav'n, when by the Scaean gate The hand of Paris, with Apollo's aid, Brave warrior as thou art, shall strike thee down."
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (67% in)
  • Then Menelaus, sad at heart, arose, Burning with wrath against Antilochus; And while the herald in the monarch's hand His royal sceptre plac'd, and bade the Greeks Keep silence, thus the godlike hero spoke: "Antilochus, till now reputed wise, What hast thou done? thou hast impugn'd my skill, And sham'd my horses, who hast brought thine own, Inferior far, before them to the goal.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (61% in)
  • To whom the Cloud-compeller answer'd thus: "Juno, restrain thy wrath; they shall not both Attain like honour; yet was Hector once, Of all the mortals that in Ilium dwell, Dearest to all the Gods, and chief to me; For never did he fail his gifts to bring.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (8% in)
  • Then haste thee to the camp, and to thy son My message bear; tell him that all the Gods Are fill'd with wrath; and I above the rest Am angry, that beside the beaked ships, He, mad with rage, the corpse of Hector keeps: So may he fear me, and restore the dead.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (15% in)
  • Hear then my words; a messenger from Jove To thee I come, to tell thee that the Gods Are fill'd with wrath, and he above the rest Is angry, that beside the beaked ships Thou, mad with rage, the corpse of Hector keep'st.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (17% in)
  • He said; they quail'd beneath their father's wrath, And brought the smoothly-running mule-wain out, Well-fram'd, new-built; and fix'd the wicker seat; Then from the peg the mule-yoke down they took, Of boxwood wrought, with boss and rings complete; And with the yoke, the yoke-band brought they forth, Nine cubits long; and to the polish'd pole At the far end attach'd; the breast-rings then Fix'd to the pole-piece: and on either side Thrice round the knob the leathern thong they wound.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (34% in)
  • Then to the female slaves he gave command To wash the body, and anoint with oil, Apart, that Priam might not see his son; Lest his griev'd heart its passion unrestrain'd Should utter, and Achilles, rous'd to wrath, His suppliant slay, and Jove's command transgress.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (73% in)

There are no more uses of "wrath" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®