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forsake
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

8 uses
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Definition
to abandon or give up on — such as someone who needs you, or an idea, or a place
  • Thus as he spoke He vanish'd; and sweet sleep forsook mine eyes.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (8% in)
  • Then let him bid thee to the battle bear His glitt'ring arms; if so the men of Troy, Scar'd by his likeness, may forsake the field, And breathing-time afford the sons of Greece, Toil-worn; for little pause has yet been theirs.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (92% in)
  • ...youth's full vigour scarce could raise, As men are now; he lifted it on high, And downward hurl'd; the four-peak'd helm it broke, Crushing the bone, and shatt'ring all the skull; He, like a diver, from the lofty tow'r Fell headlong down, and life forsook his bones, Teucer, meanwhile, from off the lofty wall The valiant Glaucus, pressing to the fight, Struck with an arrow, where he saw his arm Unguarded; he no longer brook'd the fray; Back from the wall he sprang, in hopes to hide From...
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (80% in)
  • But if the fear Of evil prophesied thyself restrain, Or message by thy Goddess-mother brought From Jove, yet send me forth with all thy force Of Myrmidons, to be the saving light Of Greece; and let me to the battle bear Thy glitt'ring arms, if so the men of Troy, Scar'd by thy likeness, may forsake the field, And breathing-time afford the sons of Greece, Toil-worn; for little pause has yet been theirs.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (5% in)
  • As when an angler on a prominent rock Drags from the sea to shore with hook and line A weighty fish; so him Patroclus dragg'd, Gaping, from off the car; and dash'd him down Upon his face; and life forsook his limbs.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (47% in)
  • Full on his temples fell the jagged mass, Drove both his eyebrows in, and crush'd the bone; Before him in the dust his eyeballs fell; And, like a diver, from the well-wrought car Headlong he plung'd; and life forsook his limbs.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (84% in)
  • Whom answer'd storm-swift Iris: "Well we know Thy glorious arms are by the Trojans held; But go thou forth, and from above the ditch Appear before them; daunted at the sight, Haply the Trojans may forsake the field, And breathing-time afford the sons of Greece, Toil-worn; for little pause has yet been theirs."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (30% in)
  • The son of Saturn, pitying, saw their grief, And Pallas thus with winged words address'd: "My child, dost thou a hero's cause forsake, Or does Achilles claim no more thy care, Who sits in sorrow by the high-prow'd ships, Mourning his comrade slain? the others all Partake the meal, while he from food abstains: Then haste thee, and, with hunger lest he faint, Drop nectar and ambrosia on his breast."
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (78% in)

There are no more uses of "forsake" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®