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brazen
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

74 uses
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Definition
unrestrained by convention or propriety
  • Him, Phyleus' warrior son, approaching near, Thrust through the junction of the head and neck; Crash'd through his teeth the spear beneath the tongue; Prone in the dust he gnash'd the brazen point.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (8% in)
  • Mars had his suff'rings; by Aloeus' sons, Otus and Ephialtes, strongly bound, He thirteen months in brazen fetters lay: And there had pin'd away the God of War, Insatiate Mars, had not their step-mother, The beauteous Eriboea, sought the aid Of Hermes; he by stealth releas'd the God, Sore worn and wasted by his galling chains.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (42% in)
  • As when the wind from off a threshing-floor, Where men are winnowing, blows the chaff away; When yellow Ceres with the breeze divides The corn and chaff, which lies in whit'ning heaps; So thick the Greeks were whiten'd o'er with dust, Which to the brazen vault of Heav'n arose Beneath the horses' feet, that with the crowd Were mingled, by their drivers turn'd to flight.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (55% in)
  • Ajax, his foot firm planted on the slain, Withdrew the brazen spear; yet could not strip His armour off, so galling flew the shafts; And much he fear'd his foes might hem him in, Who closely press'd upon him, many and brave; And, valiant as he was, and tall, and strong, Still drove him backward; he perforce retired.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (67% in)
  • By Mars and Hector of the brazen helm The Greeks hard-press'd, yet fled not to their ships, Nor yet sustain'd the fight; but back retir'd Soon as they learned the presence of the God.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (75% in)
  • ...Juno, heav'nly Queen, Herself th' immortal steeds caparison'd, Adorn'd with golden frontlets: to the car Hebe the circling wheels of brass attach'd, Eight-spok'd, that on an iron axle turn'd; The felloes were of gold, and fitted round With brazen tires, a marvel to behold; The naves were silver, rounded every way: The chariot-board on gold and silver bands Was hung, and round it ran a double rail: The pole was all of silver; at the end A golden yoke, with golden yoke-bands fair: And...
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (78% in)
  • ...reach'd the thickest of the fray, Where throng'd around the might of Diomed The bravest and the best, as lions fierce, Or forest-boars, the mightiest of their kind, There stood the white-arm'd Queen, and call'd aloud, In form of Stentor, of the brazen voice, Whose shout was as the shout of fifty men: "Shame on ye, Greeks, base cowards! brave alone In outward semblance; while Achilles yet Went forth to battle, from the Dardan gates The Trojans never ventur'd to advance, So dreaded they...
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (85% in)
  • Three children there to brave Bellerophon Were born; Isander, and Hippolochus, Laodamia last, belov'd of Jove, The Lord of counsel; and to him she bore Godlike Sarpedon of the brazen helm.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (36% in)
  • His child to Hector of the brazen helm Was giv'n in marriage: she it was who now Met him, and by her side the nurse, who bore, Clasp'd to her breast, his all unconscious child, Hector's lov'd infant, fair as morning star; Whom Hector call'd Scamandrius, but the rest Astyanax, in honour of his sire, The matchless chief, the only prop of Troy.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (71% in)
  • Thus as he spoke, great Hector stretch'd his arms To take his child; but back the infant shrank, Crying, and sought his nurse's shelt'ring breast, Scar'd by the brazen helm and horse-hair plume, That nodded, fearful, on the warrior's crest.
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (84% in)
  • He said; and, poising, hurl'd his pond'rous spear; The brazen cov'ring of the shield it struck, The outward fold, the eighth, above the sev'n Of tough bull's-hide; through six it drove its way With stubborn force; but in the seventh was stay'd, Then Ajax hurl'd in turn his pond'rous spear, And struck the circle true of Hector's shield; Right thro' the glitt'ring shield the stout spear pass'd, And thro' the well-wrought breastplate drove its way; And, underneath, the linen vest it tore;...
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (48% in)
  • He said, and straight the brazen-footed steeds, Of swiftest flight, with manes of flowing gold, He harness'd to his chariot; all in gold Himself array'd, the golden lash he grasp'd, Of curious work; and mounting on his car, Urg'd the fleet coursers; nothing loth, they flew Midway betwixt the earth and starry heav'n.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (7% in)
  • To him then speak aloud the words I send, That all may know his crimes, if yet he hope Some other Greek by treach'rous wiles to cheat, Cloth'd as he is in shamelessness! my glance, All brazen as he is, he dare not meet.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (52% in)
  • Round his broad chest a panther's skin he threw; Then on his head his brazen helmet plac'd, And in his brawny hand a lance he bore.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (5% in)
  • Before them first a table fair she spread, Well polish'd, and with feet of solid bronze; On this a brazen canister she plac'd, And onions, as a relish to the wine, And pale clear honey, and pure barley meal: By these a splendid goblet, which from home Th' old man had brought, with golden studs adorn'd: Four were its handles, and round each two doves Appear'd to feed; at either end, a cup.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (73% in)
  • In this, their goddess-like attendant first A gen'rous measure mix'd of Pramnian wine: Then with a brazen grater shredded o'er The goatsmilk cheese, and whitest barley meal, And of the draught compounded bade them drink.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (74% in)
  • Fiercely the Lapithae sustain'd the war: Stout Polypoetes first, Pirithous' son, Smote, through the brass-cheek'd helmet, Damasus; Nor stay'd the brazen helm the spear, whose point Went crashing through the bone, that all the brain Was shatter'd; onward as he rush'd, he fell.
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (38% in)
  • The hinges both gave way; the pond'rous stone Fell inwards; widely gap'd the op'ning gates; Nor might the bars within the blow sustain: This way and that the sever'd portals flew Before the crashing missile; dark as night His low'ring brow, great Hector sprang within; Bright flash'd the brazen armour on his breast, As through the gates, two jav'lins in his hand, He sprang; the Gods except, no pow'r might meet That onset; blaz'd his eyes with lurid fire.
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (98% in)
  • Three strides he took; the fourth, he reach'd his goal, AEgae; where on the margin of the bay His temple stood, all glitt'ring, all of gold, Imperishable; there arriv'd, he yok'd Beneath his car the brazen-footed steeds, Of swiftest flight, with manes of flowing gold.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (6% in)
  • All clad in gold, the golden lash he grasp'd Of curious work, and mounting on his car, Skimm'd o'er the waves; from all the depths below Gamboll'd around the monsters of the deep, Acknowledging their King; the joyous sea Parted her waves; swift flew the bounding steeds, Nor was the brazen axle wet with spray, When to the ships of Greece their Lord they bore.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (7% in)
  • Forth Teucer sprang to seize the spoil; at whom, Advancing, Hector aim'd his glitt'ring spear; He saw, and, stooping, shunn'd the brazen death A little space; but through the breast it struck Amphimachus, the son of Cteatus, The son of Actor, hastening to the fight: Thund'ring he fell, and loud his armour rang.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (25% in)
  • Then forward Hector sprang, in hopes to seize The brazen helm, that fitted well the brow Of brave Amphimachus; but Ajax met Th' advance of Hector with his glitt'ring spear; Himself he reach'd not, all in dazzling brass Encas'd; but pressing on his bossy shield Drove by main force beyond where lay the dead: Them both the Greeks withdrew; th' Athenian chiefs Stychius and brave Menestheus, bore away Amid the ranks of Greece Amphimachus; While, as two lions high above the ground Bear...
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (25% in)
  • Bristled the deadly strife with pond'rous spears, Wielded with dire intent; the brazen gleam Dazzled the sight, by flashing helmets cast, And breastplates polish'd bright, and glitt'ring shields Commingling; stern of heart indeed were he, Who on that sight with joy, not pain, could gaze.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (41% in)
  • Him, marching with proud step, Idomeneus Struck with his glitt'ring spear, nor aught avail'd His brazen breastplate; through the middle thrust, Thund'ring he fell: the victor vaunting cried: "Othryoneus, above all mortal men I hold thee in respect, if thou indeed Wilt make thy words to aged Priam good, Who promis'd thee his daughter in return: We too would offer thee a like reward; And give thee here to wed, from Argos brought, Atrides' fairest daughter, if with us Thou wilt o'erthrow...
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (45% in)
  • ...an oak, or poplar tall, Or lofty pine, which on the mountain top, For some proud ship, the woodman's axe hath hewn: So he, before the car and horses stretch'd, His death-cry utt'ring, clutch'd the blood-stain'd soil; Bewilder'd, helpless, stood his charioteer; Nor dar'd, escaping from the foemen's hands, To turn his horses: him, Antilochus Beneath the waistband struck; nor aught avail'd His brazen breastplate; through the middle thrust, He, from the well-wrought chariot, gasping, fell.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (48% in)
  • For Asius' death Deep griev'd, Deiphobus, approaching, hurl'd Against Idomeneus his glitt'ring spear: The coming weapon he beheld, and shunn'd: Beneath the ample circle of his shield, With hides and brazen plates encircled round, And by two rods sustain'd, conceal'd he stood: Beneath he crouch'd, and o'er him flew the spear: Yet harsh it grated, glancing from the shield; Nor bootless from that stalwart hand it flew, But through the midriff, close below the heart, Hypsenor, son of...
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (49% in)
  • Him Neptune by Idomeneus subdued; Seal'd his quick eyes, his active limbs restrain'd, Without the pow'r to fly, or shun the spear; Fix'd as a pillar, or a lofty tree, He stood, while through his breast Idomeneus His weapon drove; the brazen mail it broke, Which oft had turn'd aside the stroke of death; Harshly it grated, sever'd by the spear: He fell; the spear-point quiv'ring in his heart, Which with convulsive throbbings shook the shaft.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (52% in)
  • First at Idomeneus AEneas threw His spear; he saw, and shunn'd the brazen point; And vainly from his stalwart hand dismiss'd, AEneas' spear stood quiv'ring in the ground.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (59% in)
  • Him Adamas, the son of Asius, marked, As o'er the crowd he glanc'd; and springing forth, Struck with his spear the centre of the shield; But dark-hair'd Neptune grudg'd the hero's life, And stay'd the brazen point; half in the shield, Like a fire-harden'd stake, remained infix'd, The other half lay broken, on the ground.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (66% in)
  • But valiant Menelaus, Atreus' son, Transfix'd the hand that held the polish'd bow: The brazen point pass'd through, and to the bow The hand was pinn'd; back to his comrades' ranks He sprang, in hope of safety, hanging down The wounded limb, that trail'd the ashen spear.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (69% in)
  • When near they drew, Atrides miss'd his aim, With erring spear divergent; next his shield Peisander struck, but drove not through the spear; For the broad shield resisted, and the shaft Was snapp'd in sunder: Menelaus saw Rejoicing, and with hope of triumph flush'd; Unsheathing then his silver-studded sword Rush'd on Peisander; he beneath his shield Drew forth a pond'rous brazen battle-axe, With handle long, of polish'd olive-wood: And both at once in deadly combat join'd.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (71% in)
  • He standing near, full in the centre struck Atrides' shield, but drove not through the spear; Back to his comrades' shelt'ring ranks he sprang In hopes of safety, glancing all around, His body to defend; but as he turn'd, In his right flank a brazen-pointed shaft, Shot by Meriones, was buried deep: Beneath the bone it pass'd, and pierc'd him through.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (76% in)
  • ...Jove sweeps downward o'er the plain: As with loud roar it mingles with the sea, The many-dashing ocean's billows boil, Upheaving, foam-white-crested, wave on wave; So, rank on rank, the Trojans, closely mass'd, In arms all glitt'ring, with their chiefs advanc'd; Hector, the son of Priam, led them on, In combat terrible as blood-stain'd Mars: Before his breast his shield's broad orb he bore, Of hides close join'd, with brazen plates o'erlaid; The gleaming helmet nodded o'er his brow.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (93% in)
  • There enter'd she, and clos'd the shining doors; And with ambrosia first her lovely skin She purified, with fragrant oil anointing, Ambrosial, breathing forth such odours sweet, That, wav'd above the brazen floor of Jove, All earth and Heav'n were with the fragrance fill'd; O'er her fair skin this precious oil she spread; Comb'd out her flowing locks, and with her hand Wreath'd the thick masses of the glossy hair, Immortal, bright, that crown'd th' imperial head.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (31% in)
  • Then from the throne of Jove had heavier wrath And deeper vengeance on th' Immortals fall'n, But Pallas, in alarm for all the Gods, Quitting in haste the throne whereon she sat, Sprang past the vestibule, and from his head The helmet lifted, from his arm the shield; Took from his sturdy hand, and rear'd upright, The brazen spear; then with reproachful words She thus assail'd th' impetuous God of War; "Frantic, and passion-maddened, thou art lost!
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (16% in)
  • Th' Earth-shaker said, and from the field withdrew Beneath the ocean wave, the warrior Greeks His loss deploring; to Apollo then The Cloud-compeller thus his speech address'd: "Go straight to Hector of the brazen helm, Good Phoebus; for beneath the ocean wave Th' Earth-shaker hath withdrawn, escaping thus My high displeasure; had he dar'd resist, The tumult of our strife had reach'd the Gods Who in the nether realms with Saturn dwell.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (29% in)
  • Again at Hector of the brazen helm An arrow Teucer aim'd; and had the shaft The life of Hector quench'd in mid career, Not long the fight had rag'd around the ships: But Jove's all-seeing eye beheld, who watch'd O'er Hector's life, and Teucer's hopes deceiv'd.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (60% in)
  • Hector approach'd, and on the ashen spear Of Ajax, close behind the head, let fall His mighty sword; right through he clove the wood; And in his hand the son of Telamon The headless shaft held bootless; far away, Loud ringing, fell to earth the brazen point.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (13% in)
  • Of Nestor's sons, Antilochus, the first, Atymnius wounded, driving through his flank He brazen spear; prone on his face he fell.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (36% in)
  • Full on the mouth of Erymas was thrust The weapon of Idomeneus; right through, The white bones crashing, pass'd the brazen spear Below the brain; his teeth were shatter'd all; With blood, which with convulsive sobs he blew From mouth and nostril, both his eyes were fill'd; And death's dark cloud encompass'd him around.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (39% in)
  • Great Ajax still, unwearied, long'd to hurl His spear at Hector of the brazen helm; But he, well skill'd in war, his shoulders broad Protected by his shield of tough bull's hide, Watch'd for the whizzing shafts, and jav'lins' whirr.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (41% in)
  • The Lycian leaders first on ev'ry side He urg'd to hasten for their King to fight: Then 'mid the Trojans went with lofty step, And first to Panthous' son, Polydamas, To brave Agenor and AEneas next; Then Hector of the brazen helm himself Approaching, thus with winged words address'd: "Hector, forgett'st thou quite thy brave allies, Who freely in thy cause pour forth their lives, Far from their home and friends? but they from thee No aid receive; Sarpedon lies in death, The leader of...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (60% in)
  • Then at Meriones AEneas threw His brazen spear, in hopes beneath his shield To find a spot unguarded; he beheld, And downward stooping, shunn'd the brazen death; Behind him far, deep in the soil infix'd, The weapon stood; there Mars its impulse stay'd; So, bootless hurl'd, though by no feeble hand, AEneas' spear stood quiv'ring in the ground; Then thus in wrath he cried: "Meriones, Had it but struck thee, nimble as thou art, My spear had brought thy dancing to a close."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (69% in)
  • Then at Meriones AEneas threw His brazen spear, in hopes beneath his shield To find a spot unguarded; he beheld, And downward stooping, shunn'd the brazen death; Behind him far, deep in the soil infix'd, The weapon stood; there Mars its impulse stay'd; So, bootless hurl'd, though by no feeble hand, AEneas' spear stood quiv'ring in the ground; Then thus in wrath he cried: "Meriones, Had it but struck thee, nimble as thou art, My spear had brought thy dancing to a close."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (69% in)
  • He said, and led the way; him follow'd straight The godlike chief; forthwith, as loudly rings, Amid the mountain forest's deep recess, The woodman's axe, and far is heard the sound; So from the wide-spread earth their clamour rose, As brazen arms, and shields, and tough bull's-hide Encounter'd swords and double-pointed spears.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (72% in)
  • He judg'd it best at length, that once again The gallant follower of Peleus' son Should tow'rd the town with fearful slaughter drive The Trojans, and their brazen-helmed chief.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (74% in)
  • Back to his comrades' shelt'ring ranks retir'd, From certain death, Patroclus: by the stroke Of Phoebus vanquish'd, and Euphorbus' spear: But Hector, when Patroclus from the fight He saw retreating, wounded, through the ranks Advancing, smote him through the flank; right through The brazen spear was driv'n; thund'ring he fell; And deeply mourn'd his fall the Grecian host.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (92% in)
  • He said, and planting firm his foot, withdrew The brazen spear, and backward drove the dead From off the weapon's point; then, spear in hand, Intent to slay, Automedon pursued, The godlike follower of AEacides: But him in safety bore th' immortal steeds, The noble prize the Gods to Peleus gave.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (97% in)
  • At Ajax Hector threw his glitt'ring spear: He saw, and narrowly the brazen death Escap'd; but Schedius, son of Iphitus, (The bravest of the Phocian chiefs, who dwelt In far-fam'd Panopeus, the mighty Lord Of num'rous hosts,) below the collar-bone It struck, and passing through, the brazen point Came forth again beneath his shoulder-blade: Thund'ring he fell, and loud his armour rang.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (38% in)
  • At Ajax Hector threw his glitt'ring spear: He saw, and narrowly the brazen death Escap'd; but Schedius, son of Iphitus, (The bravest of the Phocian chiefs, who dwelt In far-fam'd Panopeus, the mighty Lord Of num'rous hosts,) below the collar-bone It struck, and passing through, the brazen point Came forth again beneath his shoulder-blade: Thund'ring he fell, and loud his armour rang.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (38% in)
  • Thus, cheering each his comrades, would they speak, And thus they fought; the iron clangour pierc'd The empty air, and brazen vault of Heav'n.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (53% in)
  • He said, and, poising, hurl'd the pond'rous spear; Full on Aretus' broad-orb'd shield it struck; Nor stay'd the shield its course; the brazen point Drove through the belt, and in his body lodg'd.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (65% in)
  • Then at Automedon great Hector threw His glitt'ring spear; he saw, and forward stoop'd, And shunn'd the brazen death; behind him far Deep in the soil infix'd, with quiv'ring shaft The weapon stood; there Mars its impulse stay'd.
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (66% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus the silver-footed Queen: "True are thy words, my son; and good it is, And commendable, from the stroke of death To save a worsted comrade; but thine arms, Thy brazen, flashing arms, the Trojans hold: Them Hector of the glancing helm himself Bears on his breast, exulting; yet not long Shall be his triumph, for his doom is nigh.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (19% in)
  • There on the river's bank they met in arms, And each at other hurl'd their brazen spears.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (83% in)
  • Whom answer'd thus Achilles swift of foot: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, The gifts thou deem'st befitting, 'tis for thee To give, or to withhold; but now at once Prepare we for the battle; 'tis not meet On trivial pretexts here to waste our time, Or idly loiter; much remains to do: Again be seen Achilles in the van, Scatt'ring with brazen spear the Trojan ranks; And ye, forget not man with man to fight."
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (33% in)
  • Thick as the snow-flakes that from Heav'n descend, Before the sky-born Boreas' chilling blast; So thick, outpouring from the ships, the stream Of helmets polish'd bright, and bossy shields, And breastplates firmly brac'd, and ashen spears: Their brightness flash'd to Heav'n; and laugh'd the Earth Beneath the brazen glare; loud rang the tramp Of armed men: Achilles in the midst, The godlike chief, in dazzling arms array'd.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (82% in)
  • Else had I fall'n beneath Achilles' hand, By Pallas aided; who before him moves, Light of his life, and guides his brazen spear Trojans and Leleges alike to slay.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (18% in)
  • Then all the plain, with men and horses throng'd, The brazen gleam illumin'd; rang the earth Beneath their feet, as to the battle-shock They rush'd; but in the midst, both hosts between, Eager for fight, stood forth two warriors bold, Proudly pre-eminent; Anchises' son AEneas, and Achilles' godlike might.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (30% in)
  • AEneas first with threat'ning mien advanc'd, Nodding his pond'rous helm; before his breast His shield he bore, and pois'd his brazen spear.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (31% in)
  • With words thou shalt not turn me from the field, Till we have met in arms; then try we now Each other's prowess with our brazen spears."
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (49% in)
  • He said, and hurl'd against the mighty shield His brazen spear; loud rang the weapon's point; And at arm's length Achilles held the shield With his broad hand, in fear that through its folds AEneas' spear would easy passage find; Blind fool! forgetful that the glorious gifts Bestow'd by Gods, are not with ease o'ercome, Nor yield before th' assaults of mortal men.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (49% in)
  • So broke not through AEneas' sturdy spear, Stay'd by the golden plate, the gift of Heav'n; Yet through two plates it pass'd, but three remain'd, For five were in the shield by Vulcan wrought; Two were of brass, the inner two of tin, And one of gold, which stay'd the brazen spear.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (51% in)
  • Demoleon next he smote, A helpful aid in war, Antenor's son, Pierc'd thro' the temples, thro' the brass-bound helm; Nor check'd the brazen helm the spear, whose point Went crashing through the bone, that all the brain Was shatter'd; onward as he rush'd, he fell.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (75% in)
  • Thrice Peleus' godlike son, with brazen spear, His onset made; thrice struck the misty cloud; But when, with pow'r as of a God, he made His fourth essay, in fury thus he cried: "Yet once again, vile hound, hast thou escap'd; Thy doom was nigh, but thee thy God hath sav'd, Phoebus, to whom, amid the clash of spears, Well mayst thou pray!
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (84% in)
  • Then through the ear Mulius he thrust; at th' other ear came forth The brazen point.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (90% in)
  • Next, where the tendons bind the elbow-joint, The brazen spear transfix'd Deucalion's arm; With death in prospect, and disabled arm He stood, till on his neck Achilles' sword Descending, shar'd, and flung afar, both head And helmet; from the spine's dissever'd joints The marrow flow'd, as stretch'd in dust he lay.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (91% in)
  • The noble son of Peireus next he slew, Rigmus, who came from Thracia's fertile plains; Him through the waist he struck, the brazen spear Plung'd in his bowels; from the car he fell; And as Areithous, his charioteer, His horses turn'd, Achilles through the neck His sharp spear thrusting, hurl'd him to the ground, The startled steeds in wild confusion thrown.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (92% in)
  • So on he sped; loud rattled on his breast His brazen armour, as before the God, Cow'ring, he fled; the God behind him still With thund'ring sound pursued.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (40% in)
  • The war begun by others, 'tis not meet; And shame it were, that to Olympus' height And to the brazen-floor'd abode of Jove We two without a contest should return.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (69% in)
  • Meanwhile to high Olympus fled the Maid, And to the brazen-floor'd abode of Jove.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (79% in)
  • He said, and threw with stalwart hand the spear; Achilles' leg he struck, below the knee, Nor miss'd his aim; and loudly rang the greaves Of new-wrought tin; but back the brazen point Rebounded, nor the heav'nly armour pierc'd.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (93% in)
  • Uprose then Agamemnon, King of men, The son of Atreus, and Meriones, The faithful follower of Idomeneus: But Peleus' godlike son address'd them thus: "How far, Atrides, thou excell'st us all, And with the jav'lin what thy pow'r and skill Pre-eminent, we know; take thou this prize, And bear it to thy ships; and let us give To brave Meriones the brazen spear; If so it please thee, such were my advice."
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (97% in)
  • He said; and Agamemnon, King of men, Assenting, gave to brave Meriones The brazen spear; while in Talthybius' care, His herald, plac'd the King his noble prize.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (97% in)

There are no more uses of "brazen" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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