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defile
used in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers)

7 uses
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Definition
to spoil the beauty or purity of something
in various senses, including:
  • pollute a pristine lake
  • harm a reputation or good name
  • damage or disrespect something sacred
  • take a person's virginity in a disrespectful way
  • And from his head Phoebus Apollo smote the helmet that rolled rattling away with a din beneath the hooves of the horses, the helm with upright socket, and the crests were defiled with blood and dust.
    Book 16 (89% in)
  • So they purified themselves, and cast the defilements into the sea and did sacrifice to Apollo, even unblemished hecatombs of bulls and goats, along the shore of the unvintaged sea; and the sweet savour arose to heaven eddying amid the smoke.
    Book 1 (51% in)
  • And past the tomb of ancient Ilos, son of Dardanos, across the mid plain, past the place of the wild fig-tree they sped, making for the city, and ever the son of Atreus followed shouting, and his invincible hands were defiled with gore.
    Book 11 (16% in)
  • Thus spake he, and a black cloud of grief enwrapped Achilles, and with both hands he took dark dust and poured it over his head and defiled his comely face, and on his fragrant doublet black ashes fell.
    Book 18 (5% in)
  • Now therefore will I arm me in them, but I have grievous fear lest meantime on the gashed wounds of Menoitios' valiant son flies light and breed worms therein, and defile his corpse—for the life is slain out of him—and so all his flesh shall rot."
    Book 19 (7% in)
  • A young man all beseemeth, even to be slain in war, to be torn by the sharp bronze and lie on the field; though he be dead yet is all honourable to him, whate'er be seen: but when dogs defile the hoary head and hoary beard of an old man slain, this is the most piteous thing that cometh upon hapless men."
    Book 22 (15% in)
  • Truly Achilles draggeth him recklessly around the barrow of his dear comrade so oft as divine day dawneth, yet marreth he him not; thou wouldst marvel if thou couldst go see thyself how dewy fresh he lieth, and is washed clean of blood, nor anywhere defiled; and all his wounds wherewith he was stricken are closed; howbeit many of thy son, though he be but a dead corpse, for they held him dear at heart.
    Book 24 (52% in)

There are no more uses of "defile" in The Iliad by Homer (translated by: Lang, Leaf, & Myers).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®