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apparent
used in In Cold Blood

17 uses
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Definition
clear or obvious; or appearing as such but not necessarily so
  • murder without apparent motive
    4 — The Corner (51% in)
apparent = obvious
  • His mother's donation was apparent; that of his father, a freckled, ginger-haired Irishman, was less so.
    1 — Last To See Them Alive (19% in)
  • Death, brutal and without apparent motive..."), produced in the average recipient a reaction nearer that of Mother Truitt than that of Mrs. Clare: amazement, shading into dismay; a shallow horror sensation that cold springs of personal fear swiftly deepened.
    1 — Last To See Them Alive (94% in)
  • For Dewey, himself a former sheriff of Finney County (from 1947 to 1955) and, prior to that, a Special Agent of the F.B.I. (between 1940 and 1945 he had served in New Orleans, in San Antonio, in Denver, in Miami, and in San Francisco), was professionally qualified to cope with even as intricate an affair as the apparently motiveless, all but clueless Clutter murders.
    2 — Persons Unknown (4% in)
  • Headlined Clues are few in slaying of 4 , the article, which was a follow-up of the previous day's initial announcement of the murders, ended with a summarizing paragraph: The investigators are left faced with a search for a killer or killers whose cunning is apparent if his (or their) motive is not.
    2 — Persons Unknown (16% in)
  • The clerk, apparently, was not of that opinion, for he produced a blank check, and when Dick made it out for eighty dollars more than the bill totaled, instantly paid over the difference in cash.
    2 — Persons Unknown (27% in)
  • That is to say that in return for your letter to her, which apparently annoyed her, she meant to turn the other cheek hoping in this way to incite regret for your previous letter and to place you on the defensive in your next.
    2 — Persons Unknown (85% in)
  • The ornateness of it, the mannered swoops and swirls, surprised him-a reaction that the landlady apparently divined, for she said, "Uh-huh.
    3 — Answer (19% in)
  • The crime, clueless and apparently motiveless, had taken place Saturday night, December19, at the Walker home, on a cattle-raising ranch not far from Tallahassee.
    3 — Answer (46% in)
  • Dewey admits it, but he adds that except for an apparently somewhat expurgated version of his own conduct, Hickock's story supports Smith's.
    3 — Answer (94% in)
  • He named it Red, and Red soon settled down, apparently content to share his friend's captivity.
    4 — The Corner (3% in)
  • I feel that due to the violence of the crime and the apparent utter lack of mercy shown the victims, the only way the public can be absolutely protected is to have the death penalty set against these defendants.
    4 — The Corner (7% in)
  • Of course you were apparently quite wild but I never knew too much about that.
    4 — The Corner (11% in)
  • But murderers who seem rational, coherent, and controlled, and yet whose homicidal acts have a bizarre, apparently senseless quality, pose a difficult problem, if courtroom disagreements and contradictory reports about the same offender are an index.
    4 — The Corner (51% in)
  • Moreover, the circumstances of the crime seem to him to fit exactly the concept of "murder without apparent motive."
    4 — The Corner (55% in)
  • Apparently the Reverend Dameron was determined young Andrews should answer not only to the Almighty, but also to more temporal powers, for it was his testimony, added to the defendant's confession, that settled matters.
    4 — The Corner (72% in)
  • The only important participants absent were the original defendants; in their stead, as it were, stood Judge Tate, old Mr. Fleming, and Harrison Smith, whose careers were imperiled-not because of the appellant's allegations per se, but because of the apparent credit the Bar Association bestowed upon them.
    4 — The Corner (83% in)

There are no more uses of "apparent" in In Cold Blood.

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