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Hiroshima
used in Hiroshima

168 uses
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Definition
port city in Japan; on August 6, 1945 it was almost completely destroyed by the first atomic bomb dropped on a populated area
  • They slept until about two, when they were awakened by the roar of the planes going over Hiroshima.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (36% in)
  • A Noiseless Flash At exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning, on 6 August 1945 Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department at the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (1% in)
  • At that same moment, Dr. Masakazu Fujii was settling down cross-legged to read the Osaka Asahi on the porch of his private hospital. overhanging one of the seven deltaic rivers which divide Hiroshima; Mrs Hatsuyo Nakamura, a tailor's widow, stood by the window of her kitchen watching a neighbour tearing down his house because it lay in the path of an air-raid-defence fire lane; Father Wilhelm Kleinsorge, a German priest of the Society of Jesus, reclined in his underwear on a cot on the...
    One — A Noiseless Flash (2% in)
  • ...a young member of the surgical staff of the city's large, modern Red Cross Hospital, walked along one of the hospital corridors with a blood specimen for a Wassermann test in his hand; and the Reverend Mr Kiyoshi Tanimoto, pastor of the Hiroshima Methodist Church, paused at the door of a rich man's house in Koi, the city's western suburb, and prepared to unload a handcart full of things he had evacuated from town in fear of the massive B-29 raid which everyone expected Hiroshima...
    One — A Noiseless Flash (4% in)
  • ...member of the surgical staff of the city's large, modern Red Cross Hospital, walked along one of the hospital corridors with a blood specimen for a Wassermann test in his hand; and the Reverend Mr Kiyoshi Tanimoto, pastor of the Hiroshima Methodist Church, paused at the door of a rich man's house in Koi, the city's western suburb, and prepared to unload a handcart full of things he had evacuated from town in fear of the massive B-29 raid which everyone expected Hiroshima to suffer.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (5% in)
  • Of all the important cities of Japan, only two, Kyoto and Hiroshima, had not been visited in strength by B-san, or Mr B, as the Japanese with a mixture of respect and unhappy familiarity, called the B-29; and.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (7% in)
  • He had heard uncomfortably detailed accounts of mass raids on Kure, Iwakuni, Tokuyama, and other nearby towns; he was sure Hiroshima's turn would come soon.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (8% in)
  • Hiroshima had been getting such warnings almost every night for weeks, for at that time the B-29s were using Lake Biwa, northeast of Hiroshima, as a rendezvous point, and no matter what city the Americans planned to hit, the Super-fortresses streamed in over the coast near Hiroshima.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (9% in)
  • Hiroshima had been getting such warnings almost every night for weeks, for at that time the B-29s were using Lake Biwa, northeast of Hiroshima, as a rendezvous point, and no matter what city the Americans planned to hit, the Super-fortresses streamed in over the coast near Hiroshima.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (9% in)
  • Hiroshima had been getting such warnings almost every night for weeks, for at that time the B-29s were using Lake Biwa, northeast of Hiroshima, as a rendezvous point, and no matter what city the Americans planned to hit, the Super-fortresses streamed in over the coast near Hiroshima.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (10% in)
  • The frequency of the warnings and the continued abstinence of Mr B with respect to Hiroshima had made its citizens jittery; a rumour was going around that the Americans were saving something special for the city.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (10% in)
  • The police had questioned him several times, and just a few days before, he had heard that an influential acquaintance, a Mr Tanaka a retired officer of the Toyo Kisen Kaisha steamship line, an anti-Christian, a man famous in Hiroshima for his showy philanthropies and notorious for his personal tyrannies, had been telling people that Tanimoto should not be trusted.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (18% in)
  • A few minutes after they started, the air-raid siren went off a minute-long blast that warned of approaching planes but indicated to the people of Hiroshima only a slight degree of danger, since it sounded every morning at this time, when an American weather plane came over.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (21% in)
  • Hiroshima was a fan-shaped city, lying mostly on the six islands formed by the seven estuarial rivers that branch out from the Ota River; its main commercial and residential districts, covering about four square miles in the center of the city, contained three-quarters of its population, which had been reduced by several evacuation programmes from a wartime peak of 380,000 to about 245,000.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (21% in)
  • Almost no one in Hiroshima recalls hearing any noise of the bomb.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (30% in)
  • But a fisherman in his sampan on the Inland Sea near Tsuzu, the man with whom Mr Tanimoto's mother— in-law and sister-in-law were living, saw the flash and heard a tremendous explosion; he was nearly twenty miles from Hiroshima, but the thunder was greater than when the B-29s hit Iwakuni, only five miles away.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (30% in)
  • At nearly midnight, the night before the bomb was dropped, an announcer on the city's radio station said that about two hundred B-29s were approaching southern Honshu and advised the population of Hiroshima Ito evacuate to their designated 'safe areas'.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (34% in)
  • She returned home, lit the stove in the kitchen, set some rice to cook, and sat down to read that morning's Hiroshima Chugoku.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (40% in)
  • The prefectural government, convinced, as everyone in Hiroshima was, that the city would be attacked soon, had begun to press with threats and warnings for the completion of wide fire lanes, which, it was hoped, might act in conjunction with the rivers to localize any fires started by an incendiary raid; and the neighbour was reluctantly sacrificing his home to the city's safety.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (42% in)
  • Dr Fujii had been relatively idle for about a month because in July, as the number of untouched cities in Japan dwindled and as Hiroshima seemed more and more inevitably a target, he began turning patients away, on the ground that in case of a fire raid he would not be able to evacuate them.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (57% in)
  • Now he had only two patients left a woman from Yano, injured in the shoulder, and a young man of twenty-five recovering from burns he had suffered when the steel factory near Hiroshima in which he worked had been hit.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (58% in)
  • After an alarm, Father Kleinsorge always went out and scanned the sky, and this time, when he stepped outside, he was glad to see only the single weather plane that flew over Hiroshima each day about this time.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (71% in)
  • ' On the train on the way into Hiroshima from the country, where he lived with his mother, Dr Terufumi Sasaki, the Red Cross Hospital surgeon, thought over an unpleasant nightmare he had had the night before.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (77% in)
  • Dr Sasaki, who believed that the enemy had hit only the building he was in, got bandages and began to bind the wounds of those inside the hospital; while outside, all over Hiroshima, maimed and dying citizens turned their unsteady steps towards the Red Cross Hospital to begin an invasion that was to make Dr. Sasaki forget his private nightmare for a long, long time.
    One — A Noiseless Flash (90% in)
  • He thought of a hillock in the rayon man's garden from which he could get a view of the whole of Koi — of the whole of Hiroshima, for that matter — and he ran back up to the estate.
    Two — The Fire (3% in)
  • Not just a patch of Koi, as he expected, but as much of Hiroshima as he could see through the clouded air was giving off a thick, dreadful miasma.
    Two — The Fire (3% in)
  • They were actually drops of condensed moisture falling from the turbulent tower of dust, heat, and fission fragments that had already risen miles into the sky above Hiroshima.
    Two — The Fire (4% in)
  • Seeing fire breaking out in a nearby ruin (except at the very center where the bomb itself ignited some fires, most of Hiroshima's city-wide conflagration was caused by inflammable wreckage falling on cook-stoves and live wires.
    Two — The Fire (14% in)
  • The lot of Drs Fujii, Kanda, and Machii right after the explosion — and, as these three were typical, that of the majority of the physicians and surgeons of Hiroshima — with their offices and hospitals destroyed, their equipment scattered, their own bodies incapacitated in varying degrees, explained why so many citizens Who were hurt went untended and why so many Who might have lived died.
    Two — The Fire (30% in)
  • Some of the wounded in Hiroshima were unable to enjoy the questionable luxury of hospitalization.
    Two — The Fire (37% in)
  • He had boasted, when he was in charge of the district air-raid defences, that fire might eat away all of Hiroshima but it would never come to Nobori-cho.
    Two — The Fire (67% in)
  • This alarm stemmed from one of the theories being passed through the park as to why so much of Hiroshima had burned: it was that a single plane had sprayed gasoline on the city and then somehow set fire to it in one flashing moment.
    Two — The Fire (90% in)
  • Judging by the many maimed soldiers Mr Tanimoto had seen during the day, he surmised that the barracks had been badly damaged by whatever it was that had hit Hiroshima.
    Two — The Fire (99% in)
  • THREE Details are being investigated Early in the evening of the day the bomb exploded, a Japanese naval launch moved slowly up and down the seven rivers of Hiroshima.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (0% in)
  • Early that day, 7 August, the Japanese radio broadcast for the first time a succinct announcement that very few, if any, of the people most concerned with its content, the survivors in Hiroshima, happened to hear: 'Hiroshima suffered considerable damage as the result of an attack by a few B-29s.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (31% in)
  • Early that day, 7 August, the Japanese radio broadcast for the first time a succinct announcement that very few, if any, of the people most concerned with its content, the survivors in Hiroshima, happened to hear: 'Hiroshima suffered considerable damage as the result of an attack by a few B-29s.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (31% in)
  • He said quite coldly that he was sorry, but this was a hospital for operative surgical cases only, and because she had no gangrene, she would have to return to Hiroshima that night.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (57% in)
  • If there is a real air raid here in Hiroshima, I want to die with our country.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (59% in)
  • It was several days before the survivors of Hiroshima knew they had company, because the Japanese radio and newspapers were being extremely cautious on the subject of the strange weapon.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (66% in)
  • Father Cieslik went to Misasa station, outside Hiroshima, rode for twenty minutes on an electric train, and then walked for an hour and a half in a terribly hot sun to Mr Okuma's house, which was beside the Ota River at the foot of a mountain.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (73% in)
  • He expected all the doctors of Hiroshima to come to him, because he was so rich and so famous for giving his money away.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (80% in)
  • She was taken ashore at Hatsukaichi, a town several miles to the south-west of Hiroshima, and put in the Goddess of Mercy Primary School, which had been turned into a hospital.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (85% in)
  • After that, he heard that an older brother had been trying to trace them through the post office in Ujina, a suburb of Hiroshima.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (88% in)
  • About a week after the bomb dropped, a vague, incomprehensible rumour reached Hiroshima — that the city had been destroyed by the energy released when atoms were somehow split in two.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (88% in)
  • The next day, Mrs Nakamura, although she was too ill to walk much, returned to Hiroshima alone, by electric car to the outskirts, by foot from there.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (91% in)
  • On the electric car, quite by chance, she ran into her younger sister, who had not been in Hiroshima the day of the bombing.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (96% in)
  • So I went to Hiroshima railway station.
    Three — Details are being Investigated (98% in)
  • FOUR Panic Grass and Feverfew ON 18 August, twelve days after the bomb burst, Father Kleinsorge set out on foot for Hiroshima from the Novitiate with his papier-mache suitcase in his hand.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (0% in)
  • Now he was using it to carry the yen belonging to the Society of Jesus to the Hiroshima branch of the Yokohama Specie Bank, already reopened in its half-ruined building.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (1% in)
  • Miss Sasaki lay in steady pain in the Goddess of Mercy Primary School, at Hatsukaichi, the fourth station to the south-west of Hiroshima on the electric train.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (10% in)
  • The hospitals and aid stations around Hiroshima were so crowded in the first weeks after the bombing, and their staffs were so variable, depending on their health and on the unpredictable arrival of outside help, that patients had to be constantly shifted from place to place.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (11% in)
  • Because her leg did not improve but swelled more and more, the doctors at the school bound it with crude splints and took her by car, on g September, to the Red Cross Hospital in Hiroshima.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (12% in)
  • This was the first chance she had had to look at the ruins of Hiroshima; the last time she had been carried through the city's streets, she had been hovering on the edge of unconsciousness.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (13% in)
  • Down in Hiroshima, the flood took up where the bomb had left off — swept away bridges that had survived the blast, washed out streets, undermined foundations of buildings that still stood — and ten miles to the west the Ono Army Hospital, where a team of experts from Kyoto Imperial University was studying the delayed affliction of the patients, suddenly slid down a beautiful, pine-dark mountainside into the Inland Sea and drowned most of the investigators and their mysteriously...
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (22% in)
  • It was that the atomic bomb had deposited some sort of poison on Hiroshima which would give off deadly emanations for seven years; nobody could go there all that time.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (24% in)
  • Japanese physicists, who knew a great deal about atomic fission (one of them owned a cyclotron) worried about lingering radiation at Hiroshima, and in mid-August, not many days after President Truman's disclosure of the type of bomb that had been dropped, they entered the city to make investigations.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (25% in)
  • Since radiation of at least a thousand times the natural 'leak' would be required to cause serious effects on the human body, the scientists announced that people could enter Hiroshima without any peril at all.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (31% in)
  • In Hiroshima he had been one of thousands of sufferers; in Tokyo he was a curiosity.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (37% in)
  • Then he heard about a vacant private clinic in Kaitaichi, a suburb to the east of Hiroshima.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (50% in)
  • On the way, two days later, at Yokogawa a stop just before Hiroshima, Dr Fujii bearded the train.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (54% in)
  • Dr Fujii said, 'It's hard to be cautious in Hiroshima these days.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (55% in)
  • A Planning Conference with an enthusiastic young Military Government officer, Lieutenant John D. Montgomery, of Kalama— zoo, as its adviser, began to consider what sort of city the new Hiroshima should be.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (58% in)
  • The Planning Conference, at a loss as to just what importance Hiroshima could have, fell back on rather vague cultural and paving projects.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (59% in)
  • Some of them measured the force that had been necessary to shift marble gravestones in the cemeteries, to knock over twenty-two of the forty-seven railroad cars in the yards at Hiroshima station, to lift and move the concrete roadway on one of the bridges, and to perform other noteworthy acts of strength, and concluded that the pressure exerted by the explosion varied from 5.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (63% in)
  • , had been charred at forty-four hundred yards from the center; and that the surface of grey clay tiles of the type used in Hiroshima, whose melting point is 1,3000C.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (64% in)
  • Long before the American public had been told, most of the scientists and lots of nonscientists in Japan knew — from the calculations of Japanese nuclear physicists that a uranium bomb had exploded at Hiroshima and a more powerful one, of plutonium, at Nagasaki.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (67% in)
  • The Japanese scientists thought they knew the exact height at which the bomb at Hiroshima was exploded and the approximate weight of the uranium used.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (67% in)
  • They estimated that even with the primitive bomb used at Hiroshima, it would require a shelter of concrete fifty Inches thick to protect a human being entirely from radiation sickness.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (67% in)
  • She made a gesture which took in her shrunken leg, the other patients in her room, and Hiroshima as a whole.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (70% in)
  • It came to Mrs Nakamura's attention that a carpenter from Kabe was building a number of wooden shanties in Hiroshima which he rented for fifty yen a month — $3.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (71% in)
  • Mrs. Nakamura had lost the certificates for the bonds and other wartime savings, but fortunately she had copied off all the numbers just a few days before the bombing and had taken the list to Kabe, and so, when her hair had grown in enough for her to be presentable, she went to her bank in Hiroshima, and a clerk there told her that after checking her numbers against the records the bank would give her her money.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (72% in)
  • It was in Nobori-cho, near the site of her former house, and though its floor was dirt and it was dark inside, it was at least a home in Hiroshima, and she was no longer dependent on the charity of her in— laws.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (72% in)
  • She had once had several expensive kimonos, but during the war one had been stolen, she had given one to a sister who had been bombed out in Tokuyama, she had lost a couple in the Hiroshima bombing, and now she sold her last one.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (74% in)
  • The Society of Jesus had been the first institution to build a relatively permanent shanty in the ruins of Hiroshima.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (76% in)
  • In June, he read an article in the Hiroshima Chugoku warning survivors against working too hard — but what could he do?
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (79% in)
  • In Japan, face is important even to institutions and long before the Red Cross Hospital was back to par in basic medical equipment, its directors put up a new yellow brick veneer facade, so the hospital became the handsomest building in Hiroshima — from the street.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (83% in)
  • ...was back in the hospital; Dr Sasaki was not capable of the work he once could do; Dr Fujii had lost the thirty-room hospital it took him many years to acquire, and had no prospects of rebuilding it; Mr Tanimoto's church had been ruined and he no longer had his exceptional vitality, The lives of these Six people, who were among the luckiest in Hiroshima, would never be the same, What they thought of their experiences and the use of the atomic bomb was, of course, not unanimous.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (85% in)
  • 'Dr Y. Hiraiwa, professor of Hiroshima University of Literature and Science, and one of my church members, was buried by the bomb under the two— storied house with his son, a student of Tokyo University.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (89% in)
  • 'Miss Kayoko Nobutoki, a student of girl's high school, Hiroshima Jazabuin, and a daughter of my church member, was taking rest with her friends beside the heavy fence of the Buddhist Temple.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (91% in)
  • Yes, people of Hiroshima died manly in the atomic bombing, believing that it was for Emperor's sake.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (92% in)
  • A surprising number of the people of Hiroshima remained more or less indifferent about the ethics of using the bomb.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (92% in)
  • ' Many citizens of Hiroshima, however, continued to feel a hatred for Americans which nothing could possibly erase.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (95% in)
  • It would be impossible to say what horrors were embedded in the minds of the children who lived through the day of the bombing of Hiroshima.
    Four — Panic Grass and Feverfew (98% in)
  • IN referring to those who went through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the Japanese tended to shy away from the term "survivors," because in its focus on being alive it might suggest some slight to the sacred dead.
    Five — The Aftermath (1% in)
  • In Hiroshima, the early postwar years were, besides, a time, especially painful for poor people like her, of disorder, hunger, greed, thievery, black markets.
    Five — The Aftermath (2% in)
  • She would get up in the dark and trundle a borrowed two-wheeled push-cart for two hours across the city to a section called Eba, at the mouth of one of the seven estuarial rivers that branch from the Ota River through Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (5% in)
  • This was a job of collecting money for deliveries of the Hiroshima paper, the Chugoku Shimbun, which most people in the city read.
    Five — The Aftermath (5% in)
  • Two years earlier, a Quaker professor of dendrology from the University of Washington named Floyd W. Schmoe, driven, apparently, by deep urges for expiation and reconciliation, had come to Hiroshima, assembled a team of carpenters, and, with his own hands and theirs, begun building a series of Japanese-style houses for victims of the bomb; in all, his team eventually built twenty-one.
    Five — The Aftermath (6% in)
  • In the ensuing fever of outrage in the country, the provision of adequate medical care for the victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs finally became a political issue.
    Five — The Aftermath (10% in)
  • Almost every year since 1946, on the anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing, a Peace Memorial Meeting had been held in a park that the city planners had set aside, during the city's rebuilding, as a center of remembrance, and on August 6, 1955, delegates from all over the world gathered there for the first World Conference against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.
    Five — The Aftermath (10% in)
  • Yaeko, the older daughter, left Hiroshima when she was fifteen, right after graduating from middle school, to help an ailing aunt who ran a ryokan, a Japanese-style inn.
    Five — The Aftermath (12% in)
  • Besides the Hiroshima hundred, there were huge crowds of women from other cities on the shrine grounds.
    Five — The Aftermath (14% in)
  • In May each year, around the time of the Emperor's birthday, when the trees along broad Peace Boulevard were at their feathery best and banked azaleas were everywhere in bloom, Hiroshima celebrated a flower festival.
    Five — The Aftermath (15% in)
  • Besides his duties as a junior surgeon at the Red Cross Hospital, he now had to spend every Thursday across the city at the University of Hiroshima, to chip away at his doctoral dissertation on appendicial tuberculosis.
    Five — The Aftermath (16% in)
  • He had graduated and returned to Hiroshima shortly before the bombing.
    Five — The Aftermath (20% in)
  • His brother had been killed in the war, so the way was clear for him — not only to start a practice in his father's town but also to withdraw from Hiroshima and, in effect, from being a hibakusha.
    Five — The Aftermath (20% in)
  • His grandfather having deposited large sums in the Bank of Hiroshima, Dr. Sasaki went to it confidently expecting a big loan to help him get started.
    Five — The Aftermath (20% in)
  • LONG before this, doctors in Hiroshima had begun to find that there were much more serious consequences of exposure to the bomb than the traumatic wounds and keloid scars that had been so dramatically visible in the early days.
    Five — The Aftermath (21% in)
  • It was the late sixties before analyses indeed showed some chromosome aberrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors, and it would, of course, take much longer to tell what, if any, effects there would be on their progeny.
    Five — The Aftermath (23% in)
  • As chief of surgery at the Hiroshima hospital, Dr. Hattori had been Dr. Sasaki's boss there; he had come down with radiation sickness after the bombing and had moved to Yokohama.
    Five — The Aftermath (24% in)
  • By 1977, Dr. Sasaki's credit with the Bank of Hiroshima had soared, and it granted him a loan of nineteen million yen, or about eighty thousand dollars.
    Five — The Aftermath (26% in)
  • In spite of the enormous tax deductions allowed Japanese doctors, he had come to be the payer of the highest income tax in Takata County (population thirty-seven thousand), and his tax was among the ten highest in all of Hiroshima Prefecture (twelve cities and sixty-eight towns in fifteen counties; population two million seven hundred thousand).
    Five — The Aftermath (29% in)
  • DR. SASAKI began to be considered a bit strange by Hiroshima doctors.
    Five — The Aftermath (29% in)
  • His principal pleasure, apart from his work, was to take an occasional trip to Hiroshima to eat Chinese food in the basement of the Grand Hotel, lighting up, at the end of the meal, a cigarette of the brand Mild Seven, which had printed on its packet, besides its name in English, this courteous Japanese admonition: "Let's be careful not to smoke too much, for the sake of our health.
    Five — The Aftermath (30% in)
  • He could face Hiroshima now, because a gaudy phoenix had risen from the ruinous desert of 1945: a remarkably beautiful city of more than a million inhabitants — only one in ten of whom was a hibakusha — with tall modern buildings on broad, tree— lined avenues crowded with Japanese cars, all of which had English lettering on them and appeared to be brand-new; a city of strivers and sybarites, with seven hundred and fifty-three bookstores and two thousand three hundred and fifty-six...
    Five — The Aftermath (30% in)
  • Later, some of them had been taken, as so-called Hiroshima Maidens, to the United States for plastic surgery.
    Five — The Aftermath (34% in)
  • Her ashes were carried to her family when the first group of Maidens returned to Hiroshima that summer of 1956, and it fell to Father Takakura to preside at her funeral.
    Five — The Aftermath (34% in)
  • The younger daughter, Hisako, became devoted to him, and when, after eighteen months, his various symptoms grew so bad that he was going to have to be hospitalized she asked him to baptize her, and he did, on the day before he entered the Hiroshima Red Cross Hospital for an entire year's stay.
    Five — The Aftermath (35% in)
  • Once each week, he took a train to Hiroshima and went to the Red Cross Hospital for a checkup.
    Five — The Aftermath (37% in)
  • At Hiroshima station, he picked up what he loved best to read as he travelled — timetables with schedules of trains going all over Honshu Island.
    Five — The Aftermath (37% in)
  • DURING this period, Father Takakura was one of many people whom Dr. Robert J. Lifton interviewed in preparing to write his book Death in Life: Survivors of Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (39% in)
  • He loved fried prawns and ate them when he went to Hiroshima for checkups.
    Five — The Aftermath (41% in)
  • The doctors in Hiroshima shook their heads.
    Five — The Aftermath (41% in)
  • He told her of a good orphanage in Hiroshima called the Garden of Light.
    Five — The Aftermath (48% in)
  • ABOUT once a year during this time, Sasaki-san traveled from Kyushu to Hiroshima to see her brother and sister, and, always, to call on Father Kleinsorge, now Takakura, at the Misasa church.
    Five — The Aftermath (51% in)
  • She hurried to Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (51% in)
  • She had seen so much death in Hiroshima after the bombing, and had seen what strange things so many people did when they were cornered by death, that nothing now surprised or frightened her.
    Five — The Aftermath (55% in)
  • Yaeko was married to a doctor who owned his own clinic in Hiroshima, and Sister Sasaki could go to him if she needed a doctor.
    Five — The Aftermath (58% in)
  • In 1948, he built a new clinic, in Hiroshima, on the site of the one that had been ruined by the bomb.
    Five — The Aftermath (59% in)
  • Keiji lived with his parents, in a house that Dr.Fujii had built next to the Hiroshima clinic.
    Five — The Aftermath (61% in)
  • In 1955, he paid the entrance fee of a hundred and fifty thousand yen, then a little more than four hundred dollars, to join the exclusive Hiroshima Country Club.
    Five — The Aftermath (61% in)
  • The Hiroshima players were at first called, in English, the Carps, until he pointed out to the public that the plural for that fish, and for those ballplayers, had no "s."
    Five — The Aftermath (62% in)
  • He went often to watch games at the huge new stadium, not far from the A-Bomb Dome — the ruins of the Hiroshima Industrial Promotion Hall, which the city had kept as its only direct physical reminder of the bomb.
    Five — The Aftermath (62% in)
  • Hiroshima, in its regeneration as a brand-new city after the bombing, turned up with one of the gaudiest entertainment districts in all Japan — an area where, at night, vast neon signs of many colors winked and beckoned to potential customers of bars, geisha houses, coffee shops, dance halls, and licensed houses of prostitution.
    Five — The Aftermath (62% in)
  • At the time the so-called Hiroshima Maidens had gone to the United States for plastic surgery, the year before, they were accompanied by two Hiroshima surgeons.
    Five — The Aftermath (63% in)
  • At the time the so-called Hiroshima Maidens had gone to the United States for plastic surgery, the year before, they were accompanied by two Hiroshima surgeons.
    Five — The Aftermath (63% in)
  • WAS he, nine years later, in Hiroshima, still so happy-go-lucky?
    Five — The Aftermath (65% in)
  • One cloud in the father's life was a quarrel in the Hiroshima Lions Club, of which he was president.
    Five — The Aftermath (65% in)
  • They called in one of the best doctors they knew, a Professor Myanishi, from Hiroshima University.
    Five — The Aftermath (69% in)
  • There was nothing to be done until January 4th; everything in Hiroshima would be shut down tight for the three-day New Year's holiday, and hospital services would be at a minimum.
    Five — The Aftermath (69% in)
  • He was becoming convinced that the collective memory of the hibakusha would be a potent force for peace in the world, and that there ought to be in Hiroshima a center where the experience of the bombing could become the focus of international studies of means to assure that atomic weapons would never be used again.
    Five — The Aftermath (75% in)
  • Eventually, in the States, without thinking to check with Mayor Shinzo Hamai or anyone else in Hiroshima, he drafted a memorandum sketching this idea.
    Five — The Aftermath (75% in)
  • On March 5, 1949, the memorandum appeared in the magazine, under the title "Hiroshima's Idea" — an idea that, Cousins' introductory note said, "the editors enthusiastically endorse and with which they will associate themselves": The people of Hiroshima, aroused from the daze that followed the atomic bombing of their city on August 6, 1945, know themselves to have been part of a laboratory experiment which proved the long-time thesis of peacemakers.
    Five — The Aftermath (76% in)
  • On March 5, 1949, the memorandum appeared in the magazine, under the title "Hiroshima's Idea" — an idea that, Cousins' introductory note said, "the editors enthusiastically endorse and with which they will associate themselves": The people of Hiroshima, aroused from the daze that followed the atomic bombing of their city on August 6, 1945, know themselves to have been part of a laboratory experiment which proved the long-time thesis of peacemakers.
    Five — The Aftermath (77% in)
  • The people of Hiroshima ... earnestly desire that out of their experience there may develop some permanent contribution to the cause of world peace.
    Five — The Aftermath (77% in)
  • ... The people of Hiroshima were in fact, to a man, totally unaware of Kiyoshi Tanimoto's (and now Norman Cousins') proposal.
    Five — The Aftermath (77% in)
  • On August 6th, the fourth anniversary of the bombing, the national Diet promulgated a law establishing Hiroshima as a Peace Memorial City, and the final design for the commemorative park by the great Japanese architect Kenzo Tange was revealed to the public.
    Five — The Aftermath (78% in)
  • A few days after the anniversary, Norman Cousins visited Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (78% in)
  • After a visit to an orphanage, Cousins returned to the States with yet another idea — for "moral adoption" of Hiroshima orphans by Americans, who would send financial support for the children.
    Five — The Aftermath (78% in)
  • His friend Tani asked him to donate it to the church in Hiroshima, and he did.
    Five — The Aftermath (79% in)
  • Through a press code and other measures, General Douglas MacArthur, the supreme commander of the occupying forces, had strictly prohibited dissemination of or agitation for any reports on the consequences of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings — including the consequence of a desire for peace — and the officials evidently thought that Tanimoto's peace center might get the local governments in trouble.
    Five — The Aftermath (80% in)
  • Tanimoto persevered, calling together a number of leading citizens, and, after Norman Cousins had set up a Hiroshima Peace Center Foundation in New York to receive American funds, these people established the center in Hiroshima, with Tanimoto's church as its base.
    Five — The Aftermath (80% in)
  • Tanimoto persevered, calling together a number of leading citizens, and, after Norman Cousins had set up a Hiroshima Peace Center Foundation in New York to receive American funds, these people established the center in Hiroshima, with Tanimoto's church as its base.
    Five — The Aftermath (80% in)
  • THE DAY before the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, the city, in fear of incendiary raids, had put hundreds of schoolgirls to work helping to tear down houses and clear fire lanes.
    Five — The Aftermath (82% in)
  • A woman named Shizue Masugi now visited Hiroshima from Tokyo.
    Five — The Aftermath (83% in)
  • On her trip to Hiroshima, she asked Kiyoshi Tanimoto what most needed to be done for women who were hibakusha.
    Five — The Aftermath (84% in)
  • THE Tokyo and Osaka operations on the girls were not altogether successful, and, on a visit to Hiroshima, Kiyoshi Tanimoto's friend Marvin Green wondered whether it might be possible for some of them to be taken to America, where the techniques of plastic surgery were more advanced.
    Five — The Aftermath (84% in)
  • In September 1953, Norman Cousins arrived in Hiroshima with his wife to deliver some moral-adoption funds.
    Five — The Aftermath (85% in)
  • In a report of this meeting, the Hiroshima paper Chugoku Shimbun reported, "Rev.
    Five — The Aftermath (86% in)
  • Hiroshima doctors had wanted to know why the Maidens were not operated on in Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (86% in)
  • Hiroshima doctors had wanted to know why the Maidens were not operated on in Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (86% in)
  • NORMAN COUSINS had gone to work in New York on the Maidens idea, and in late 1954 Dr. Arthur Barsky, the chief of plastic surgery at both Mount Sinai and Beth Israel hospitals, and Dr. William Hitzig, an internist on the Mount Sinai staff and Cousins' personal physician, arrived in Hiroshima to cull from among the Maidens those whose prospects for transformation by surgery were best.
    Five — The Aftermath (86% in)
  • Hiroshima, Japan.
    Five — The Aftermath (88% in)
  • "This is Hiroshima," Edwards said as a mushroom cloud grew on the viewers' screens, "and in that fateful second on August 6, 1945, a new concept of life and death was given its baptism.
    Five — The Aftermath (88% in)
  • In walked a tall, fattish American man, whom Edwards introduced as Captain Robert Lewis, copilot of the Enola Gay on the Hiroshima mission.
    Five — The Aftermath (89% in)
  • In Hiroshima, she had been given two days to uproot herself — and the four children she and her husband now had — and get to Los Angeles.
    Five — The Aftermath (90% in)
  • INCOMING TELEGRAM: CONFIDENTIAL FROM: TOKYO TO: SECRETARY OF STATE MAY 12, 1955 EMBASSY-USIS SHARE WASHINGTON CONCERN LEST HIROSHIMA GIRLS PROJECT GENERATE UNFAVORABLE PUBLICITY.
    Five — The Aftermath (91% in)
  • MAY WELL TRY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TRIP TO RAISE FUNDS FOR HIROSHIMA MEMORIAL PEACE CENTER, HIS PET PROJECT.
    Five — The Aftermath (91% in)
  • On August 6th, the tenth anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing, Tanimoto placed a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.
    Five — The Aftermath (92% in)
  • On that day, in Hiroshima itself, far away from him, a genuine Japanese peace movement, riding the anger over the Lucky Dragon incident, got under way.
    Five — The Aftermath (92% in)
  • Cousins had bypassed the peace center in Hiroshima and dealt with the city government; Tanimoto had begged to have the moral-adoption project put under the center's wing, but his role had turned out to be that of a shopper for briefcases.
    Five — The Aftermath (93% in)
  • The crowning blow came when the ashes of the Maiden named Tomoko Nakabayashi, who had died under anaesthesia at Mount Sinai, were returned to her parents in Hiroshima and he was not even invited to the funeral, which was conducted by his old friend Father Kleinsorge.
    Five — The Aftermath (94% in)
  • On June 7, 1973, Kiyoshi Tanimoto wrote the "Evening Essay" column in the Hiroshima Chugoku Shimbun: These last few years when August 6th approaches, voices are heard lamenting that this year, once again, the commemorative events will be held by a divided peace movement.
    Five — The Aftermath (98% in)
  • The appeal of Hiroshima ... has nothing to do with politics.
    Five — The Aftermath (98% in)
  • When foreigners come to Hiroshima, you often hear them say, "The politicians of the world should come to Hiroshima and contemplate the world's political problems on their knees before this Cenotaph.
    Five — The Aftermath (99% in)
  • When foreigners come to Hiroshima, you often hear them say, "The politicians of the world should come to Hiroshima and contemplate the world's political problems on their knees before this Cenotaph.
    Five — The Aftermath (99% in)
  • As the fortieth anniversary of the bombing approached, the Hiroshima peace center was nominally still in place — now in the Tanimoto home.
    Five — The Aftermath (99% in)
  • He lived in a snug little house with a radio and two television sets, a washing machine, an electric oven, and a refrigerator, and he had a compact Mazda automobile, manufactured in Hiroshima.
    Five — The Aftermath (**% in)

There are no more uses of "Hiroshima" in Hiroshima.

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