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derive
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

4 uses
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Definition
to get something from something else

(If the context doesn't otherwise indicate where something came from, it is generally from reasoning—especially deductive reasoning.)
  • There are four sister and parallel architectures, each having its special character, but derived from the same origin, the round arch.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (91% in)
  • All the other veins of the triple city either derived their supply from them or emptied into them.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (21% in)
  • He seldom rallied the poor students of Montaigu on the ~cappettes~ from which they derived their name, or the bursars of the college of Dormans on their shaved tonsure, and their surtout parti-colored of bluish-green, blue, and violet cloth, ~azurini coloris et bruni~, as says the charter of the Cardinal des Quatre-Couronnes.
    1.4.2 — Vol 1 Bk 4 Chpt 2 — Claude Frollo (15% in)
  • "Will you deny," said Coictier, "the sympathetic force of the collar bone, and the cabalistics which are derived from it?"
    1.5.1 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 1 — Abbas Beati Martini (60% in)

There are no more uses of "derive" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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