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abbey
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

22 uses
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Definition
a building where monks or nuns live or lived
  • There were a great many abbeys, of a beauty more devout, of a grandeur more solemn than the mansions, but not less beautiful, not less grand.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (37% in)
  • Notre-Dame de Paris has not, like the Abbey of Tournus, the grave and massive frame, the large and round vault, the glacial bareness, the majestic simplicity of the edifices which have the rounded arch for their progenitor.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (52% in)
  • Thus, in order to indicate here only the principal details, while the little Red Door almost attains to the limits of the Gothic delicacy of the fifteenth century, the pillars of the nave, by their size and weight, go back to the Carlovingian Abbey of Saint-Germain des Prés.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (67% in)
  • Thus, the Roman abbey, the philosophers' church, the Gothic art, Saxon art, the heavy, round pillar, which recalls Gregory VII.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (68% in)
  • There is the Abbey of Jumiéges, there is the Cathedral of Reims, there is the Sainte-Croix of Orleans.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (85% in)
  • The colleges, which are, in fact, the intermediate ring between the cloister and the world, hold the middle position in the monumental series between the Hôtels and the abbeys, with a severity full of elegance, sculpture less giddy than the palaces, an architecture less severe than the convents.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (39% in)
  • Some of these faubourgs were important: there were, first, starting from la Tournelle, the Bourg Saint-Victor, with its one arch bridge over the Bièvre, its abbey where one could read the epitaph of Louis le Gros, ~epitaphium Ludovici Grossi~, and its church with an octagonal spire, flanked with four little bell towers of the eleventh century (a similar one can be seen at Etampes; it is not yet destroyed); next, the Bourg SaintMarceau, which already had three churches and one convent;...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (43% in)
  • But that which attracted the eye most of all, and fixed it for a long time on that point, was the abbey itself.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (46% in)
  • These four edifices filled the space from the Rue des Nonaindières, to the abbey of the Celestins, whose spire gracefully relieved their line of gables and battlements.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (48% in)
  • With these two quarters, one of Hôtels, the other of houses, the third feature of aspect presented by the city was a long zone of abbeys, which bordered it in nearly the whole of its circumference, from the rising to the setting sun, and, behind the circle of fortifications which hemmed in Paris, formed a second interior enclosure of convents and chapels.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (66% in)
  • Between the Rue Neuve-duTemple and the Rue Saint-Martin, there was the Abbey of Saint-Martin, in the midst of its gardens, a superb fortified church, whose girdle of towers, whose diadem of bell towers, yielded in force and splendor only to Saint-Germain des Prés.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (67% in)
  • ...immense block, which the Romans called ~iusula~, or island, of bourgeois houses, flanked on the right and the left by two blocks of palaces, crowned, the one by the Louvre, the other by the Tournelles, bordered on the north by a long girdle of abbeys and cultivated enclosures, all amalgamated and melted together in one view; upon these thousands of edifices, whose tiled and slated roofs outlined upon each other so many fantastic chains, the bell towers, tattooed, fluted, and ornamented...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (70% in)
  • Behind the Bastille there were twenty hovels clustered round the curious sculptures of the Croix-Faubin and the flying buttresses of the Abbey of SaintAntoine des Champs; then Popincourt, lost amid wheat fields; then la Courtille, a merry village of wine-shops; the hamlet of Saint-Laurent with its church whose bell tower, from afar, seemed to add itself to the pointed towers of the Porte SaintMartin; the Faubourg Saint-Denis, with the vast enclosure of Saint-Ladre; beyond the...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (71% in)
  • Yonder is the Abbey of Saint-Martin, a shrill, cracked singer; here the gruff and gloomy voice of the Bastille; at the other end, the great tower of the Louvre, with its bass.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (97% in)
  • There is a bacchanalian monk, with ass's ears and glass in hand, laughing in the face of a whole community, as on the lavatory of the Abbey of Bocherville.
    1.5.2 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 2 — This Will Kill That (33% in)
  • Add to this the pleasure of displaying himself in rides about the city, and of making his fine military costume, which you may still admire sculptured on his tomb in the abbey of Valmont in Normandy, and his morion, all embossed at Montlhéry, stand out a contrast against the parti-colored red and tawny robes of the aldermen and police.
    1.6.1 — Vol 1 Bk 6 Chpt 1 — An Impartial Glance at.... (14% in)
  • "For the Abbey of Saint-Antoine des Champs," answered Fleur-de-Lys, without raising her eyes.
    2.7.1 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 1 — The Danger of Confiding One's.... (25% in)
  • At his feet, some chickens were searching the thickets and pecking, enamelled beetles ran about in the sun; overhead, some groups of dappled gray clouds were floating across the blue sky; on the horizon, the spire of the Abbey Saint-Victor pierced the ridge of the hill with its slate obelisk; and the miller of the Copeaue hillock was whistling as he watched the laborious wings of his mill turning.
    2.9.1 — Vol 2 Bk 9 Chpt 1 — Delirium (28% in)
  • When he heard the brisk challenge of the men-at-arms of the abbey, around the crenelated, circumscribing wall of Saint-Germain, he turned aside, took a path which presented itself between the abbey and the lazar-house of the bourg, and at the expiration of a few minutes found himself on the verge of the Pré-aux-Clercs.
    2.9.1 — Vol 2 Bk 9 Chpt 1 — Delirium (38% in)
  • When he heard the brisk challenge of the men-at-arms of the abbey, around the crenelated, circumscribing wall of Saint-Germain, he turned aside, took a path which presented itself between the abbey and the lazar-house of the bourg, and at the expiration of a few minutes found himself on the verge of the Pré-aux-Clercs.
    2.9.1 — Vol 2 Bk 9 Chpt 1 — Delirium (38% in)
  • Hence, condemned men were to be seen whose hair had grown white in a cloister, on the steps of a palace, in the enclosure of an abbey, beneath the porch of a church; in this manner the asylum was a prison as much as any other.
    2.9.2 — Vol 2 Bk 9 Chpt 2 — Hunchbacked, One Eyed, Lame (15% in)
  • The Abbey of Saint-German-des-Pres was castellated like a baronial mansion, and more brass expended about it in bombards than in bells.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (26% in)

There are no more uses of "abbey" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

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