toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

prologue
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

17 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
an introduction to a fictional work; or anything that precedes a more important event
  • The four personages, after having reaped a rich reward of applause for their reverences, began, in the midst of profound silence, a prologue, which we gladly spare the reader.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (51% in)
  • Much ill-will would also have been required, not to comprehend, through the medium of the poetry of the prologue, that Labor was wedded to Merchandise, and Clergy to Nobility, and that the two happy couples possessed in common a magnificent golden dolphin, which they desired to adjudge to the fairest only.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (58% in)
  • The amiable applause which had greeted the beginning of his prologue was still echoing in his bosom, and he was completely absorbed in that species of ecstatic contemplation with which an author beholds his ideas fall, one by one, from the mouth of the actor into the vast silence of the audience.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (65% in)
  • He had, accordingly, hoisted himself, during the first verses of the prologue, with the aid of the pillars of the reserve gallery, to the cornice which ran round the balustrade at its lower edge; and there he had seated himself, soliciting the attention and the pity of the multitude, with his rags and a hideous sore which covered his right arm.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (69% in)
  • The silence which he preserved allowed the prologue to proceed without hindrance, and no perceptible disorder would have ensued, if ill-luck had not willed that the scholar Joannes should catch sight, from the heights of his pillar, of the mendicant and his grimaces.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (71% in)
  • The prologue stopped short, and all heads turned tumultuously towards the beggar, who, far from being disconcerted by this, saw, in this incident, a good opportunity for reaping his harvest, and who began to whine in a doleful way, half closing his eyes the while,—"Charity, please!"
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (75% in)
  • This episode considerably distracted the attention of the audience; and a goodly number of spectators, among them Robin Poussepain, and all the clerks at their head, gayly applauded this eccentric duet, which the scholar, with his shrill voice, and the mendicant had just improvised in the middle of the prologue.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (80% in)
  • Quite the contrary; our poet had too much good sense and too threadbare a coat, not to attach particular importance to having the numerous allusions in his prologue, and, in particular, the glorification of the dauphin, son of the Lion of France, fall upon the most eminent ear.
    1.1.3 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 3 — Monsieur the Cardinal (16% in)
  • The unhappy prologue stopped short for the second time.
    1.1.3 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 3 — Monsieur the Cardinal (29% in)
  • The reader has, probably, not forgotten the impudent beggar who had been clinging fast to the fringes of the cardinal's gallery ever since the beginning of the prologue.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (22% in)
  • Alas! my dear reader, it is Pierre Gringoire and his prologue.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (45% in)
  • From the moment of the cardinal's entrance, Gringoire had never ceased to tremble for the safety of his prologue.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (46% in)
  • At first he had enjoined the actors, who had stopped in suspense, to continue, and to raise their voices; then, perceiving that no one was listening, he had stopped them; and, during the entire quarter of an hour that the interruption lasted, he had not ceased to stamp, to flounce about, to appeal to Gisquette and Liénarde, and to urge his neighbors to the continuance of the prologue; all in vain.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (48% in)
  • We must also believe, and we say it with regret, that the prologue had begun slightly to weary the audience at the moment when his eminence had arrived, and created a diversion in so terrible a fashion.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (49% in)
  • The four personages of the prologue were bewailing themselves in their mortal embarrassment, when Venus in person, (~vera incessa patuit dea~) presented herself to them, clad in a fine robe bearing the heraldic device of the ship of the city of Paris.
    1.1.4 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 4 — Master Jacques Coppenole (75% in)
  • In the matter of love, as in all other affairs, he willingly assented to temporizing and adjusting terms; and a good supper, and an amiable tête-a-tête appeared to him, especially when he was hungry, an excellent interlude between the prologue and the catastrophe of a love adventure.
    1.2.7 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 7 — A Bridal Night (33% in)
  • There then ensued between the physician and the archdeacon one of those congratulatory prologues which, in accordance with custom, at that epoch preceded all conversations between learned men, and which did not prevent them from detesting each other in the most cordial manner in the world.
    1.5.1 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 1 — Abbas Beati Martini (11% in)

There are no more uses of "prologue" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®