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facade
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

38 uses
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Definition
face or visible appearance
  • , at the Place Royale: facades of brick with stone corners, and slated roofs, tri-colored houses;—the Paris of Louis XIII.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (80% in)
  • In the centre of the lofty Gothic* facade of the palace, the grand staircase, incessantly ascended and descended by a double current, which, after parting on the intermediate landing-place, flowed in broad waves along its lateral slopes,—the grand staircase, I say, trickled incessantly into the place, like a cascade into a lake.
    1.1.1 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 1 — The Grand Hall (12% in)
  • There remains to-day but a very imperceptible vestige of the Place de Grève, such as it existed then; it consists in the charming little turret, which occupies the angle north of the Place, and which, already enshrouded in the ignoble plaster which fills with paste the delicate lines of its sculpture, would soon have disappeared, perhaps submerged by that flood of new houses which so rapidly devours all the ancient facades of Paris.
    1.2.2 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 2 — The Place de Greve (9% in)
  • At night, one could distinguish nothing of all that mass of buildings, except the black indentation of the roofs, unrolling their chain of acute angles round the place; for one of the radical differences between the cities of that time, and the cities of the present day, lay in the facades which looked upon the places and streets, and which were then gables.
    1.2.2 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 2 — The Place de Greve (37% in)
  • But, disenchanted though Gringoire was, the whole effect of this picture was not without its charm and its magic; the bonfire illuminated, with a red flaring light, which trembled, all alive, over the circle of faces in the crowd, on the brow of the young girl, and at the background of the Place cast a pallid reflection, on one side upon the ancient, black, and wrinkled facade of the House of Pillars, on the other, upon the old stone gibbet.
    1.2.3 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 3 — Kisses for Blows (20% in)
  • The poor and flickering flames of the fire permitted Gringoire to distinguish, amid his trouble, all around the immense place, a hideous frame of ancient houses, whose wormeaten, shrivelled, stunted facades, each pierced with one or two lighted attic windows, seemed to him, in the darkness, like enormous heads of old women, ranged in a circle, monstrous and crabbed, winking as they looked on at the Witches' Sabbath.
    1.2.6 — Vol 1 Bk 2 Chpt 6 — The Broken Jug (27% in)
  • And, in the first place, to cite only a few leading examples, there certainly are few finer architectural pages than this facade, where, successively and at once, the three portals hollowed out in an arch; the broidered and dentated cordon of the eight and twenty royal niches; the immense central rose window, flanked by its two lateral windows, like a priest by his deacon and subdeacon; the frail and lofty gallery of trefoil arcades, which supports a heavy platform above its fine,...
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (6% in)
  • And what we here say of the facade must be said of the entire church; and what we say of the cathedral church of Paris, must be said of all the churches of Christendom in the Middle Ages.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (12% in)
  • Let us return to the facade of Notre-Dame, as it still appears to us, when we go piously to admire the grave and puissant cathedral, which inspires terror, so its chronicles assert: ~quoe mole sua terrorem incutit spectantibus~.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (14% in)
  • Three important things are to-day lacking in that facade: in the first place, the staircase of eleven steps which formerly raised it above the soil; next, the lower series of statues which occupied the niches of the three portals; and lastly the upper series, of the twenty-eight most ancient kings of France, which garnished the gallery of the first story, beginning with Childebert, and ending with Phillip Augustus, holding in his hand "the imperial apple."
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (16% in)
  • ...caused the staircase to disappear, by raising the soil of the city with a slow and irresistible progress; but, while thus causing the eleven steps which added to the majestic height of the edifice, to be devoured, one by one, by the rising tide of the pavements of Paris,—time has bestowed upon the church perhaps more than it has taken away, for it is time which has spread over the facade that sombre hue of the centuries which makes the old age of monuments the period of their beauty.
    1.3.1 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 1 — Notre-Dame (20% in)
  • Over the south side of this place bent the wrinkled and sullen facade of the Hôtel Dieu, and its roof, which seemed covered with warts and pustules.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (28% in)
  • A few miserable, greenish hovels, hanging over the water in front of these sumptuous Hôtels, did not prevent one from seeing the fine angles of their facades, their large, square windows with stone mullions, their pointed porches overloaded with statues, the vivid outlines of their walls, always clear cut, and all those charming accidents of architecture, which cause Gothic art to have the air of beginning its combinations afresh with every monument.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (49% in)
  • ...the whole, the scaleornamented spire of the Ave-Maria; on the left, the house of the Provost of Paris, flanked by four small towers, delicately grooved, in the middle; at the extremity, the Hôtel Saint-Pol, properly speaking, with its multiplied facades, its successive enrichments from the time of Charles V., the hybrid excrescences, with which the fancy of the architects had loaded it during the last two centuries, with all the apses of its chapels, all the gables of its galleries, a...
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (54% in)
  • On one of its two facades, there are the cannon-balls of the 10th of August; on the other, the balls of the 29th of July.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (84% in)
  • It is true that the architect was at a good deal of trouble to conceal the clock face, which would have destroyed the purity of the fine lines of the facade; but, on the other hand, we have that colonnade which circles round the edifice and under which, on days of high religious ceremony, the theories of the stock-brokers and the courtiers of commerce can be developed so majestically.
    1.3.2 — Vol 1 Bk 3 Chpt 2 — A Bird's-Eye View of Paris (90% in)
  • And, if it was a Christmas Eve, while the great bell, which seemed to emit the death rattle, summoned the faithful to the midnight mass, such an air was spread over the sombre facade that one would have declared that the grand portal was devouring the throng, and that the rose window was watching it.
    1.4.3 — Vol 1 Bk 4 Chpt 3 — Immanis Pecoris Custos, Immanior Ipse (96% in)
  • We will spell out in company, also, the facade of Saint-Come, of Sainte-Geneviève-des-Ardents, of Saint Martin, of Saint-Jacques de la Boucherie—.
    1.5.1 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 1 — Abbas Beati Martini (86% in)
  • Sometimes a portal, a facade, an entire church, presents a symbolical sense absolutely foreign to worship, or even hostile to the Church.
    1.5.2 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 2 — This Will Kill That (34% in)
  • The architect, the poet, the master, summed up in his person the sculpture which carved his facades, painting which illuminated his windows, music which set his bells to pealing, and breathed into his organs.
    1.5.2 — Vol 1 Bk 5 Chpt 2 — This Will Kill That (39% in)
  • ...after having contemplated this lively and noisy scene which is being enacted in all parts of the Place, will now transfer his gaze towards that ancient demi-Gothic, demi-Romanesque house of the Tour-Roland, which forms the corner on the quay to the west, he will observe, at the angle of the facade, a large public breviary, with rich illuminations, protected from the rain by a little penthouse, and from thieves by a small grating, which, however, permits of the leaves being turned.
    1.6.2 — Vol 1 Bk 6 Chpt 2 — The Rat-Hole (18% in)
  • In those days of brilliancy, warmth, and serenity, there is a certain hour above all others, when the facade of Notre-Dame should be admired.
    2.7.1 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 1 — The Danger of Confiding One's.... (2% in)
  • Its rays, growing more and more horizontal, withdraw slowly from the pavement of the square, and mount up the perpendicular facade, whose thousand bosses in high relief they cause to start out from the shadows, while the great central rose window flames like the eye of a cyclops, inflamed with the reflections of the forge.
    2.7.1 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 1 — The Danger of Confiding One's.... (3% in)
  • I do not know, by the way be it said, whether it be not the same, the interior of which can be seen to-day through a little square window, opening to the east at the height of a man above the platform from which the towers spring; a bare and dilapidated den, whose badly plastered walls are ornamented here and there, at the present day, with some wretched yellow engravings representing the facades of cathedrals.
    2.7.2 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 2 — A Priest and a Philosopher are.... (4% in)
  • Only the great rose window of the facade, whose thousand colors were steeped in a ray of horizontal sunlight, glittered in the gloom like a mass of diamonds, and threw its dazzling reflection to the other end of the nave.
    2.7.2 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 2 — A Priest and a Philosopher are.... (33% in)
  • " But Dom Claude, who stood in terror of some new freak on the part of Jehan, reminded his worthy disciple that they had some figures on the facade to study together, and the two quitted the cell, to the accompaniment of a great "ouf!" from the scholar, who began to seriously fear that his knee would acquire the imprint of his chin.
    2.7.5 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 5 — The Two Men Clothed in Black (98% in)
  • He advanced a few paces, and caught sight of the two screech owls, that is to say, Dom Claude and Master Jacques Charmolue, absorbed in contemplation before a carving on the facade.
    2.7.6 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 6 — The Effect Which Seven Oaths.... (23% in)
  • It was at this college that he had sketched out what he called his studies, and, through a scholar's teasing habit which still lingered in him, he never passed the facade without inflicting on the statue of Cardinal Pierre Bertrand, sculptured to the right of the portal, the affront of which Priapus complains so bitterly in the satire of Horace, ~Olim truncus eram ficulnus~.
    2.7.7 — Vol 2 Bk 7 Chpt 7 — The Mysterious Monk (46% in)
  • ...moment when the superintendent's assistants were preparing to execute Charmolue's phlegmatic order, he threw his leg over the balustrade of the gallery, seized the rope with his feet, his knees and his hands; then he was seen to glide down the facade, as a drop of rain slips down a windowpane, rush to the two executioners with the swiftness of a cat which has fallen from a roof, knock them down with two enormous fists, pick up the gypsy with one hand, as a child would her doll, and...
    2.8.6 — Vol 2 Bk 8 Chpt 6 — Three Human Hearts Differently.... (88% in)
  • At night, when the remainder of the beggar horde slept, when there was no longer a window lighted in the dingy facades of the Place, when not a cry was any longer to be heard proceeding from those innumerable families, those ant-hills of thieves, of wenches, and stolen or bastard children, the merry tower was still recognizable by the noise which it made, by the scarlet light which, flashing simultaneously from the air-holes, the windows, the fissures in the cracked walls, escaped, so...
    2.10.3 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 3 — Long Live Mirth (4% in)
  • At the moment when Quasimodo was lost in conjectures, it seemed to him that the movement had re-appeared in the Rue du Parvis, which is prolonged into the city perpendicularly to the facade of Notre-Dame.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (9% in)
  • ...the first arrangements were completed, and we must say, to the honor of vagabond discipline, that Clopin's orders were executed in silence, and with admirable precision, the worthy chief of the band, mounted on the parapet of the church square, and raised his hoarse and surly voice, turning towards Notre-Dame, and brandishing his torch whose light, tossed by the wind, and veiled every moment by its own smoke, made the reddish facade of the church appear and disappear before the eye.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (27% in)
  • Meanwhile, nothing could be distinguished on the facade, to whose summit the light of the torches did not reach.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (36% in)
  • At the same moment, a shower of large stones began to fall from the top of the facade on the assailants.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (43% in)
  • From above he beheld the vagabonds, filled with triumph and rage, shaking their fists at the gloomy facade; and both on the gypsy's account and his own he envied the wings of the owls which flitted away above his head in flocks.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (55% in)
  • Below that fire, below the gloomy balustrade with its trefoils showing darkly against its glare, two spouts with monster throats were vomiting forth unceasingly that burning rain, whose silvery stream stood out against the shadows of the lower facade.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (64% in)
  • The Duke of Egypt pointed sadly to the two streams of boiling lead which did not cease to streak the black facade, like two long distaffs of phosphorus.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (72% in)
  • It was like a layer of living monsters on the stone monsters of the facade.
    2.10.4 — Vol 2 Bk 10 Chpt 4 — An Awkward Friend (98% in)

There are no more uses of "facade" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

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