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mortal
used in The House of the Seven Gables

12 uses
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1  —5 uses as in:
mortal body
Definition
human (especially merely human); or subject to death
  • As a general rule, Providence seldom vouchsafes to mortals any more than just that degree of encouragement which suffices to keep them at a reasonably full exertion of their powers.
    Chapter 3 — The First Customer (75% in)
  • Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (5% in)
  • Possibly some cynic, at once merry and bitter, had desired to signify, in this pantomimic scene, that we mortals, whatever our business or amusement,—however serious, however trifling,—all dance to one identical tune, and, in spite of our ridiculous activity, bring nothing finally to pass.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (32% in)
  • Finally, when he showed a purpose of shouting forth the secret loudly enough to be heard from his own sphere into that of mortals, his companions struggled with him, and pressed their hands over his mouth; and forthwith—whether that he were choked by it, or that the secret itself was of a crimson hue—there was a fresh flow of blood upon his band.
    Chapter 13 — Alice Pyncheon (87% in)
  • And wise Uncle Venner, passing slowly from the ruinous porch, seemed to hear a strain of music, and fancied that sweet Alice Pyncheon—after witnessing these deeds, this bygone woe and this present happiness, of her kindred mortals—had given one farewell touch of a spirit's joy upon her harpsichord, as she floated heavenward from the HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES!
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (99% in)

There are no more uses of "mortal" flagged with this meaning in The House of the Seven Gables.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —7 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • It is like death, without death's quiet privilege,—its freedom from mortal care.
    Chapter 4 — A Day Behind the Counter (79% in)
  • The aspect of the venerable mansion has always affected me like a human countenance, bearing the traces not merely of outward storm and sunshine, but expressive also, of the long lapse of mortal life, and accompanying vicissitudes that have passed within.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (2% in)
  • And inaudible, too, by mortal ear, but heard with all-comprehending love and pity in the farthest heaven, that almost agony of prayer—now whispered, now a groan, now a struggling silence—wherewith she besought the Divine assistance through the day!
    Chapter 2 — The Little Shop-Window (5% in)
  • Anon, as age came stealing, like a sad twilight, back over his figure, you would have felt tempted to hold an argument with Destiny, and affirm, that either this being should not have been made mortal, or mortal existence should have been tempered to his qualities.
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (57% in)
  • Anon, as age came stealing, like a sad twilight, back over his figure, you would have felt tempted to hold an argument with Destiny, and affirm, that either this being should not have been made mortal, or mortal existence should have been tempered to his qualities.
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (57% in)
  • In the incident now to be sketched, there was a touching recognition, on Clifford's part, of God's care and love towards him,—towards this poor, forsaken man, who, if any mortal could, might have been pardoned for regarding himself as thrown aside, forgotten, and left to be the sport of some fiend, whose playfulness was an ecstasy of mischief.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (60% in)
  • It is a truth (and it would be a very sad one but for the higher hopes which it suggests) that no great mistake, whether acted or endured, in our mortal sphere, is ever really set right.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (43% in)

There are no more uses of "mortal" in The House of the Seven Gables.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®