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interminable
used in The House of the Seven Gables

4 uses
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Definition
seemingly endless; or long and unpleasant (often boring or annoying)
  • Chanticleer and his family had either not left their roost, disheartened by the interminable rain, or had done the next wisest thing, by seasonably returning to it.
    Chapter 16 — Clifford's Chamber (59% in)
  • Chanticleer himself, though stalking on two stilt-like legs, with the dignity of interminable descent in all his gestures, was hardly bigger than an ordinary partridge; his two wives were about the size of quails; and as for the one chicken, it looked small enough to be still in the egg, and, at the same time, sufficiently old, withered, wizened, and experienced, to have been founder of the antiquated race.
    Chapter 10 — The Pyncheon Garden (48% in)
  • XI The Arched Window FROM the inertness, or what we may term the vegetative character, of his ordinary mood, Clifford would perhaps have been content to spend one day after another, interminably,—or, at least, throughout the summer-time,—in just the kind of life described in the preceding pages.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (1% in)
  • His error lay in supposing that this age, more than any past or future one, is destined to see the tattered garments of Antiquity exchanged for a new suit, instead of gradually renewing themselves by patchwork; in applying his own little life-span as the measure of an interminable achievement; and, more than all, in fancying that it mattered anything to the great end in view whether he himself should contend for it or against it.
    Chapter 12 — The Daguerreotypist (52% in)

There are no more uses of "interminable" in The House of the Seven Gables.

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