toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

contiguous
used in The House of the Seven Gables

5 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
with a common boundary; or very close in space or time
  • She stood by a window, holding a book in close contiguity to her nose, as if with the hope of gaining an olfactory acquaintance with its contents, since her imperfect vision made it not very easy to read them.
    Chapter 7 — The Guest (1% in)
  • In the front gable, under the impending brow of the second story, and contiguous to the street, was a shop-door, divided horizontally in the midst, and with a window for its upper segment, such as is often seen in dwellings of a somewhat ancient date.
    Chapter 1 — The Old Pyncheon Family (95% in)
  • Phoebe's presence, and the contiguity of her fresh life to his blighted one, was usually all that he required.
    Chapter 9 — Clifford and Phoebe (44% in)
  • But, on the other hand, if an impressible person, standing alone over the brink of one of these processions, should behold it, not in its atoms, but in its aggregate,—as a mighty river of life, massive in its tide, and black with mystery, and, out of its depths, calling to the kindred depth within him,—then the contiguity would add to the effect.
    Chapter 11 — The Arched Window (51% in)
  • His desk and private drawers, in a room contiguous to his bedchamber, had been ransacked; money and valuable articles were missing; there was a bloody hand-print on the old man's linen; and, by a powerfully welded chain of deductive evidence, the guilt of the robbery and apparent murder had been fixed on Clifford, then residing with his uncle in the House of the Seven Gables.
    Chapter 21 — The Departure (15% in)

There are no more uses of "contiguous" in The House of the Seven Gables.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®